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Teaching Tips ▼

~~ Homeschool Teaching Tips ~~


HOW DOES YOUR CHILD LEARN?

Have you noticed that your child learns more readily from video than from books, or vice versa? Does your child like things spelled out for her, or prefer to figure things out for herself? (Overview of Learning Styles)

At the Co-op, we're big believers that having some knowledge about our kids' learning styles can not only make us better teachers, but can make the homeschooling experience more enjoyable for all concerned.

Tell us how you adapt your teaching to the learning styles of your children, and get a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card. Our winner will be randomly drawn from posts that are entered during LEARNING STYLES Month.

We will do the drawing at the beginning of each month for posts in the prior month, and announce the winner in the Co-op newsletter. Your posts will remain on this page to provide ideas and inspiration to other homeschool language arts teachers! (Need help?)


LLB

I have five children. My oldest has discovered that if he writes what he needs to memorize over and over, whether it be Latin vocab or his weekly Bible verses, it sticks in his brain so much easier. One of my sons is very hands on. He is very creative at working with his hands (he can create whatever he wants out of Legos) but has a very hard time remembering read aloud content. I finally encouraged him to make pictures in his brain as he listens to a story to help him remember it. Now he tells me he is making pictures (I find in general he needs more time to think through something and I have to slow down to give him that processing time). Since he is only 5, we put phonics to poem or music to help him remember and I have magnetic letters he can hold and move around. His body definitely needs to be involved in the learning process. In the swimming pool, I swish him around in the shape of whatever letter or number he calls out for a whole body phonics lesson. He loves that! My four year old is a keen observer as well as an auditory learner. He pulls out wonderful observations during family read aloud time. He is also quick to find things in the pictures if we re looking at a picture book together. My daughter is a voracious reader and learns a lot from reading, even as a six year old reading at a 3rd and 4th grade level. Art projects and hands on science experiments are others ways my kids love to learn. My 3 year old loves music. By the age of 2 he had learned all of the memory verses that his older siblings were learning in Awana as he heard them through song. I find him already doing addition as he sings the kids math songs that we play in the car and his favorite way to review phonics is through song. So we have quite a few learning styles and I find that using all of them while we learn is good review and exposure for the other kids that don t necessarily learn the same way. I know I ve continued to be stretched to meet the needs of the various learning styles in our home as a mom and teacher and continually ask for the Lord s help and wisdom in teaching my kids the way He has designed them to learn.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

Mrs. Snowflake

My 11 year old has been a challenge since the first hours after she was born. She is determined, energetic, and very busy. Her learning style is spontaneous, and her modality is tactile-kinesthetic. I tried for so long to fit her into the mold of her older siblings. They were easy to teach. It took me a long time to realize that this "spirited" child would never sit still long enough to teach the traditional way. She is the last one at home, so I am her audience, which is often tiring.

She is continually coming up with these "great ideas", and when that happens, I just have to let her run with it. Sometimes, that even happens in the middle of the night. I might wake up to 15 paintings or to a home made cake covered with fondant, or to a craft box totally ravaged and not one inch of tape left in the house. I have had to read history while she is practicing her new idea of becoming a contortionist or read science while she is flipping over a chair 100 times.

I have learned that books work best for history, for they touch something deep inside of her emotions. She is one who will take up a fight for the underdog. I have learned to ditch many a curriculum or many thought out plans because it only worked for a short time. What I have also learned is to use a lot of free resources, like the library, when this happens.

She also loves to make videos. I purchased a lifetime subscription to Always Ice Cream a couple of years ago, and this gives her a safe place to interact with other girls, to be creative, and to post her videos. I am finding that even after a couple years, she is still enjoying the site and learning new things, so this was a good purchase.

Mostly, I have learned to let her alone when she becomes driven with an idea, because this is a great personality trait that she will use when she is an adult. I don't want to squelch it out of her. I have to tell myself that it is okay when we don't do things like other home schoolers all the time. When I do, she will usually say, "This was a great school day, Mom!"

3 months ago · Like · Comment

AmyN

My 6 yr old is a hands-on learner. She loves to build things and create new models with existing tools. I always try to reuse older teaching materials in new ways because she responds to that best.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

GinnieF

I have one daughter, and she is a visual learner; however, she learns well if something is put to music. I would say she is also a curious and supportive learner. Since she doesn't have any siblings, I work with her a lot and let her talk through what she is doing, or we pretend she is teaching other children how to do something through a "how to" video. To meet the needs of her social side we are involved in quite a few activities outside the home.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

Laetice

My oldest son learns mostly through reading and stories . He reads a lot, books on tape and podcasts and radio programs also work well. He is very good with math and physics and needs to understand all the details. I use Life of Fred with him for math. My daughter was really struggling with reading and spelling, even math was difficult . She learned well through project and daily life. I realized that she was struggling with dyslexia and is a visual leaner. I switched her to ST Math, Nessy and Reading Eggs and she literally bloomed. When I teach her a new concept, I check her comprehension by asking her what she is picturing in her mind. I also use videos a lot with her. My middle son is like a sponge. He seems to be learning without much effort. My youngest will start kindergarten next year, so i still need to figure him out but he seems to need to touch things and move a lot.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

Nikki

We started homeschooling when my 9th grade daughter was in first grade. I'd heard many wonderful things about a particular math program so I checked it out. It really appealed to my logical, step-by-step mind, so I excitedly bought it thinking, "This will be perfect!" First day of first grade we had major tears, she didn't get it, she didn't like it. Come to find out, she's a more global, big picture thinker. She LOVED the kind of books that taught through a story. And BTW, the other program is a wonderful program, just not for my daughter. And I've heard people say their child hated the program we ended up using. At a recent curriculum sale people asked me what I thought about a particular program and I always preface it with, "it depends on the kind of learner your child is".

3 months ago · Like · Comment

ldrolling

We just started homeschooling about two months ago. I have two kids, a boy and a girl, ages 7 & 11. I struggled for the first month trying to force them to do notebooking activities, because that's what you do when you homeschool, right? I expected them to sit, and listen intently, being really focused on what we were doing. I expected that since the curriculum was good, it would work for my kids. A month in, and I decided to switch up their Language Arts curriculum because it wasn't working. They hated the first ones I had picked out. The change was life giving. I just changed up their math too, for the same reasons. For my son, I had to come to terms with the fact that he's a 7 year old boy, who wiggles a lot, and as a lefty he has a hard time with a lot of writing. He's also very smart, so he things repetitive work is pointless and will just refuse to do it. Notebooking or anything with a lot of writing, for him, is a nightmare. But, he loves being read to and has this amazing ability to hold onto information, and really interact with it and process it. My daughter is very creative, so loves doing things that fit that. Both of my kids love being read to. Without intending it, we've landed in a more Charlotte Mason style of curriculum, with a few spins of our own thrown in. My kids love story, and connect with information that way, and I love reading to them, so things where we can read and talk about it, maybe draw and play with ideas, is working for us.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

afnavyfamily

I have four children that I started homeschooling right from the beginning. Not a single one of them learns the same way. I will use the traditional learning styles to describe my chidlren/students but there is definitely some newer schools of thought with learning styles out there. With my oldest child, she thankfully learns the same way I do which made teaching her easier in most subjects. However, #2 was on the opposite end of the spectrum. My daughter and I are both extremely visual - we need to see it to believe it. My #2, my oldest son, can read it and understand it immediately. He is verbal and conceptual. His learning style was so different from me, I wasn't sure how we were going to survive. I was convinced that I would reuse curriculum with each child - not once did I consider I would have to use other resources or curriculum. Once I discovered we weren't on the same page or even in the same book, I began to research other programs to use for my son. Once I finally found something that spoke his "language", we were back in business. And, overtime, we've discovered he is very aural as well. Listening to music while he studies is extremely soothing for him. Finally a way for he and I to connect and understand each other. Besides being visual, I am very aural and love music in the background. For a while, though, I wasn't sure we were going to survive this homeschool adventure. Enter in child #3....someone completely different than the first two. He is completely physical and logical. I cannot even comprehend how to learn this way. He is very kinesthetic and loves order and routine. I can relate to that way of thinking. Like me, he is a list maker. That is our saving grace and what motivates him through the day. It's what helps us jive during lessons. I can give him added responsibility and he takes it seriously. Part of the verbal/aural learner is the daydreamer. Since my oldest son (child #2) is like this, I found assigning him the full load meant he wouldn't finish until 8pm at night and caused many arguments. He didn't need the full load to reinforce the lesson - he read it, he understood it and he was done. I needed to move on. Child #3 thrives on extra work. He likes to get it done and doesn't mind if it is repeat of something he's already learned. Enter child #4 - he is much like child #2 in the daydreamer aspect but not at all a verbal learner. He is the only child that does not like to read. He is my social learner. While he is spatial and visual in some areas of learning, that is not his primary style....he thrives in co-op classes or in the subjects that are combined with older siblings. He also has a little bit of aural and physical learning styles tucked in there depending on the subject. What I have found over time is I need to not only understand how they learn but how I teach. At first, I taught by how I learn. When that wasn't working and after almost giving up, I discovered to find those common threads with each child and capitalize on that. Child #1 was easy - she is visual so her and I relate on most things when it comes to academics. We just need to get past the mentality of mom doesn't know anything. Child #2 loves music - music is my soul-language. We relate and I can use that to help him learn. Child #3 is logical & physical - I like order and lists, too. I use that to help motivate him and show him steps/processes. Child #4 is social. I look for learning opportunities that utilize more than just him as the student. All of this is time consuming and sometimes challenging but worth it. Sometimes, it has just taken me a while to get there.

3 months ago · Like · Comment

saberger

I started to homeschool my middle child in 4th grade (4 years ago) mainly because I never saw her! She was at school until 3, then at gymnastics from 3:30 until 8:30, do homework, go to bed, start all over again. I was SO nervous! I didn't think she would listen to me and wasn't 100% sure that I knew her learning style. Well, it turned out that she was a VERY visual learner. I soon got the hang of it and several months later my youngest (who was in 3rd grade) needed to homeschool. He was not doing well in public school emotionally or educationally. He was saying that he was dumb and couldn't do anything. It was HORRIBLE! I had to completely backtrack with him and I spent these past couple of years working on getting him to where he can be. Turns out that he is pretty darn good in math and science! And I learned that he is a very black/white kind of kid. He has a very hard time seeing the gray, so that is or current goal. Learning the different ways to think and approach things in school as well as in life.It turned out that he needed constant repetition. And he needed to go slowly. He also needed a schedule and a list of his assignments. He was SO different from my daughter! A month later, my eldest needed to homeschool due to medical reasons. He is a sponge. He just soaks up information. He was the one that I was WAY too intimidated to even attempt homeschooling! Just too smart! Well, he LOVES to do research and loves computers. So, he is my project-based learner. I find something that he is interested (or has just wondered about) and turn it into a full blown project. I actually get excited when I come up with the projects for him because he loves doing them and learning all about it. Each child has a completely different learning style and they look at everything in such different ways. I do try to take advantage of the fact that they look at things differently by doing history together and discussing everything that they learn. It has really been pretty fascinating for me to see these significant differences in them. I mean, I always knew that they had different personalities, but this is so cool and invigorating for me to learn about how THEY learn! And now I can pick and choose curriculum that suits them best! Homeschooling was the BEST...DECISION...EVER!!! :)

4 months ago · Like · Comment

DRM

I haven't figured this out yet for my kids who are under the age of 8, but it was tremendously helpful to realize that my 9 year old is an imaginative learner. It was also a wake-up call for me, since my personal preference is top down structure, to see how much she thrives and learns when she's given a great deal of freedom. She still hasn't made me into a complete unschooler, but as I grow as a parent and come to really see who she is and how she learns, I think we're moving in that direction. One of the best things about homeschooling is being able to adapt to my unique children; the challenge for me is not wallowing in regrets that I did the "wrong" thing before I truly got to know their talents and inclinations!

4 months ago · Like · Comment
Nikki: You and your daughter sound like me and my daughter!
3 months ago · Like

wolfcrazy

My youngest is more of a hands-on learner as a 12 yr old. We try to do hands-on projects, not just writing. I do have a computer program she uses that I got on special here. I have posters and books that she uses as research to help her with the program. She loves looking things up. She also loves legos so she will sometimes use legos to do schoolwork. For the fall, I will be putting together a hands-on curriculum for history and science.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

BTHM

When I brought my child home from private school 2 yrs ago, I had no idea she was dyslexic, but within 2 weeks of having her home and trying to teach her, I realized she had reading and writing issues. After some testing and trial and error, we discovered she doesn't fit the mold for dyslexia. Some things she prefers visual learning, others she likes audio, and the rest traditional. It has been a LONG 2 years trying to figure out what she liked (apologia cds-awesome) and hated (lapbooks?forget it). Now after some remedial work, that has changed a bit again this year. As we are moving into middle school (EEK), she now is more comfortable with using keyboards, giving oral presentations and using audio books for reading. Having gone to year round school this year also helped, as we were able to take more 'mental health' days, and allow for anxiety issues to be calmed down so she could focus again. What we have both learned is that you may start off with one style, but as education level changes, something different might work better. we know have a very eccentric homestyle method, but it works and she is so much happier and learning 2 grades ahead! Be flexible and adjust, that is the key!

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Serian16

I have 5 kids and they each learn differently so I take a lesson and teach it over several days and in different formats so that they can all understand and can see different ways to learn still gets you to the same answer. We also homeschool year round so it adds an opportunity everyday to engage my children in the world around them, and often we are changing what we planned on because someone had a question about something and we used the time to discover the answer to their question.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Serian16

I have 5 kids and they each learn differently so I take a lesson and teach it over several days and in different formats so that they can all understand and can see different ways to learn still gets you to the same answer. We also homeschool year round so it adds an opportunity everyday to engage my children in the world around them, and often we are changing what we planned on because someone had a question about something and we used the time to discover the answer to their question.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Brainerdlady

Special needs daughter in 4th grade. First year of homeschool. She can only stay focused in the morning, so we do half days/6 days a week. She loves to read, but comprehension is a problem. We have had her reading books while listening to the audio book to help with this. She also retains more when visuals and real life experiences are incorporated into the process.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

jgramkee

My daughter is a visual learning. She loves to be out and able to actual see what she is learning about rather than reading it in a book. I will have her watch videos, do experiments, draw or build what we are studying.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

jgramkee

My daughter is a visual learning. She loves to be out and able to actual see what she is learning about rather than reading it in a book. I will have her watch videos, do experiments, draw or build what we are studying.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

jgramkee

My daughter is a visual learning. She loves to be out and able to actual see what she is learning about rather than reading it in a book. I will have her watch videos, do experiments, draw or build what we are studying.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

IndoMom

My teenage son has done a lot of hard work to deal with his learning differences. He is reading pretty well now, but still learns best when material is presented in multimedia format with both audio and and visual/video content. I try to select curriculum materials that have at least some multimedia content. I often find videos to supplement his lessons. He really remembers new material better when he's watched a video lesson on the topic.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

bneal

My daughter is a very kinesthetic learner. She doesn't like to do one thing for very long (unless it is sitting and being read to. She could do that for hours). I have ordered curriculums that are strongly kinesthetic and hands-on in their learning approach and I try to vary our subjects and break them up throughout the day.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

schoch6

One of my children prefers to sleep in and has the best brain power later in the day. Another one of my children is the first one awake, dressed, hair done, and full of energy. I have adapted my teaching by beginning lessons for my early riser first thing in the morning. I then allow my other child to get her rest and begin a little later in the day, even if it's after dinner as this is when she shows her best work.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Buslady0321

We are currently home schooling our 3rd and last child. She is high functioning autistic and has some short term memory issues. She is 15 and our main focus for her is success as an adult. Academics are important but we do a lot of practice runs on independent living skills, i.e. laundry, cooking, budgeting. Due to her short term memory issues, I have to review daily what we learned previously along with stopping during our lessons to have her repeat what she knows. It keeps her focused instead of pulling inwardly as autistic people do. I always try to put her into the scenario we are reading about in history or literature to keep her more focused. The biggest thing I've learned from teaching an autistic child is that God is in control...not me.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Buslady0321

We are currently home schooling our 3rd and last child. She is high functioning autistic and has some short term memory issues. She is 15 and our main focus for her is success as an adult. Academics are important but we do a lot of practice runs on independent living skills, i.e. laundry, cooking, budgeting. Due to her short term memory issues, I have to review daily what we learned previously along with stopping during our lessons to have her repeat what she knows. It keeps her focused instead of pulling inwardly as autistic people do. I always try to put her into the scenario we are reading about in history or literature to keep her more focused. The biggest thing I've learned from teaching an autistic child is that God is in control...not me.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Buslady0321

We are currently home schooling our 3rd and last child. She is high functioning autistic and has some short term memory issues. She is 15 and our main focus for her is success as an adult. Academics are important but we do a lot of practice runs on independent living skills, i.e. laundry, cooking, budgeting. Due to her short term memory issues, I have to review daily what we learned previously along with stopping during our lessons to have her repeat what she knows. It keeps her focused instead of pulling inwardly as autistic people do. I always try to put her into the scenario we are reading about in history or literature to keep her more focused. The biggest thing I've learned from teaching an autistic child is that God is in control...not me.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

KatieS

My boys are similar in that they both learn better when they're engaged online, vs trying to read continuously from a textbook. We use Time4Learning and while it works for both of them, they each use it differently. One does a little of each subject each day and the other prefers a block schedule for the week (math on Monday, Science on Tuesday, etc). I love that I can tailor their education to each of their needs!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Ritch

This will be our first HS experience! When we discovered that our daughter had several disorders, we also discovered that a traditional school setting was not in her best interest. We decided to give Home Schooling a try and know that she thrives from hands-on, interactive, learning making Home Schooling the best choice for her to thrive. We are looking forward to incorporating all learning styles into our teaching style to maximize her potential and keep her interested in learning. She is excited about working on the computer, researching and putting together projects, will receive immediate rewards/gratification (this keeps her motivated) and making learning FUN! Because she cannot sit still, we have invested in a trampoline, a CD/DVD player, a laptop, fidget spinners, visual charts and graphs, and developed contests-competing against each other (she loves challenges and competitions, too). She loves to move--when practicing spelling, she will often make up a dance that incorporates the letter shapes for the words she is spelling. When she reads, she likes to be expressive and does better when reading aloud to someone. Because she enjoys art, we are incorporating make and take projects to enhance Science and Social Studies. We will journal, complete with pictures, for Language Arts. All in all, we are looking forward to an exciting year and seeing the advances she will undoubtedly make with the one-one attention and more flexible learning environment.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Conerberal

My older son (age 11) inherited my ability to hear/see things and recall them almost verbatim. At the very least he gets the main idea and most of the details. However, he is a perfectionist so he doesn't do well when the challenge is beyond his ability to "get it" the very first time. It's an art finding ways to challenge him without overwhelming him.

My younger son (age 8) has no problems with failures, but he has some attention, executive function, reading, and sensory issues that require a different approach. He is not a writer yet and reading is a struggle, so most of his learning is through read alouds. He is NOT an auditory learner, if forced to sit and just listen. He won't be able to recall a thing. But give him a pencil and paper and let him draw what you are reading and he is able to retell with the best of them. He also needs to be able to move so our reading and spelling lessons look a lot like a tumbling class as we practice word fluency and spelling. It will be interesting to see how he learns when his writing and reading skills improve.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

ERice

My 3 kids are all different. My youngest, 9, needs a challenge . She likes to be given very hard math or science problems and left alone to solve. This was hard to do at first but so awesome to watch now that I know. My middle, 15, is the opposite. He needs to talk about what he is learning. He does well when he tells me what he is learning and I ask critical thinking questions. Writing is difficult for him so we have to talk through that a lot too. My oldest, 18, is a senior!!! She is very visual. She needs to read it and sometimes look at a chart. She has adapted to that and takes a ton of notes. She takes a little longer since everything needs to be written and read several times but she does well really tests and papers. She has really done well taking some dual credit courses at the local college and is graduating much more ready for college since she understands how she learns.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Lynnheart

We have all different types of learners in our household. For my auditory learner, we spend more time discussing what he is learning. I type up what he says during discussion time and then let him use it as a base to begin a paper. His writing has improved and essay goals more obtainable. We have utilized audio books, but also incorporate reading. Breaking down lessons into bite size pieces has been helpful. Online textbooks have helped with this aspect as he does not physically see the whole textbook. My oldest daughter is constantly creating. We have formed lessons around things she has created. Paintings and drawings have led to biology based lessons, music that she has written has led to literary stories. She is my child who learned multiplication through making chocolate chip cookies. My younger daughter likes to discuss and write. She likes to read and then write about what she is learning. I use more literature based resources with her than some of our other kids. We read about science, history and math. I ensure she has plenty of writing notebooks and tools. Her love for science and math plays into her need for hands on learning. We opt for homemade science kits and sporting equipment for gifts for her. Even then she is writing out recipe steps and lab pages. We also utilize the camera so she can make her own tutorials. Our youngest enjoys singing. She has learned quite a few skills by rhymes and songs. We read poetry, nursery rhymes, sing songs with motions.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mygallaget

I have two kids, currently in 6th and 8th grade. Both are kinesthetic learners. I think they both prefer audiobooks because listening allows them to do other things (like move around) while focusing on a story. I have one that needs to think (deeply) in order to speak and the other who needs to speak (abundantly) in order to think. As a result, traditional writing assignments work well for the first and discussion or rapid oral Q&A works better for the other. It is helpful to wait for group discussion until after my thinker has written so that my speaker doesn't railroad the conversation trying to think through everything aloud.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

momwnoclue

I had my girls take an interest survey. I know that may sound weird but I know my girls and I just wanted to verify what I thought with what the surveys concluded. I have twins but I have a gifted daughter who came from the public school gifted program and her twin sister is very happy go lucky lets have a party. I have found since homeschooling they are a lot more organized. Anyways Mattie does better when we do presentations and more group oriented work where my other daughter wants to see the assignment and get to it. I have given her more book work so to speak but also given her harder things and tried to strengthen her writing skills by more in depth research on things that she is interested in, They also love to video each other for instance our idea for History starting in September is to focus on the election. They will research each candidate. They will research what a Republican is / Democrat is, They will research what it takes to be the president (my gifted girl thinks she wants to be president so that she never has to drive because she is scared to drive), through this process they will be given every avenue to do their research, but the fun part is I am going to have them put together their own campaign and run for president, I will have them draw Republican or Democratic party. I will have them record each other and I will post it on Facebook for them to get votes!! I am very excited and I know this is not exactly what yall may have been looking for in an answer but I feel with an assignment such as this I am covering more than one if not all types of learning styles and I plan to elaborate like this in each subject as much as possible!!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Intentional mom

I first took an assessment that told me my learning style and then I had my child take one as well. When I saw the results I prayed and asked God for guidance on how to merge both styles together. My son is a kinestetic learner so I have to be creative in how I introduce the lessons. As I continued to try different things I have found what works for both of us.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Carbon

Ironically, I have discovered that I have two children with opposite learning styles and dispositions. This has led to an extreme need for differentiation in my teaching. My first son is very communicative, requires presenting his findings, and thrives on discovery. With his style, it has led me to create more independent research projects and a variety of ways for him to present them such as making PowerPoint presentations, WebQuests, and video presentations.

On the other hand, I've found thorough this overview that my other son is the opposite. He desires order, needs structure and direction, and is very visual and desires motion. He is not the traditional pencil and paper child, and when this mode is required he needs a plan to accomplish major writing projects. For him, I've had to include hands on projects such as construction, act out readings, and many video and online tasks.

I think learning style is important not only because it identifies a child's core strength of learning, but when matched properly it allows a child to learn in a successful way. And, there is nothing like the feeling of seeing a child "get it" in a way that is cognitively appropriate for them.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MomOf5

Innate

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MomOf5

spelling correcti

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MomOf5

ing drive. There is also a universal style that works like magic.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MomOf5

I am a mom of 5. I discovered before I had children that there is an inate learn

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Melissa421

My two daughters have different learning styles. Both do well learning from books, but my older daughter is much more visual, while my younger daughter is a more auditory learner. For my oldest I need to make sure to incorporate more visual aids while we are learning something new. It really cements the idea in her mind when we do that, rather than just hearing/talking about a subject. With her younger sister she likes the visual aides as well, but she can grasp a lot more material just through listening. I have been amazed by what she has learned even when it seemed like she wasn't really paying attention. Both also like hands-on activities, so I try to incorporate those as often as possible. My son is only 2, so I am still figuring out his learning style. He is very hands on right now and I'm guessing he is going to be the most kinesthetic of the three of them. It has been a fun challenge learning how to teach to the three of them. I am currently expecting #4 and I can't wait to see what type of learner he is.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Sharon pav

I watched my children from day one. I noticed my son was very active. All subjects including math were taught from a kinesthetic angle and somehow sport related. My daughter was a people person, artistic and story driven. For her, interaction with others, lots of reading and research projects, esp if it involved other cultures. We recently took a Meyer's Briggs personality test, mostly for fun at this point. But it could be helpful if you are having difficulty assessing learning style

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Stogner

My son is an audio/visual learner. He likes things concise and hates review. He also needs a lot of structure. We started out with BJU press books this year. They are wonderful books, however to keep things fresh we used a lot of discovery education streaming video to supplement lessons. They have many virtual labs. The science tech book also kept him engaged. The science tech book keeps him motivated because it is a self directed lesson. You can highlight the text and it will speak the text as well as highlight each word dictated. This keeps him focused on the screen. Vocabulary words are bolded in blue. If you click on them you get an animated definition as well as a video. Then it has assessments at the end of the unit. What a great way to motivate a child to self direct his or her own education! Recently I found spelling city.com which is a wonderful website that has games and flash cards for spelling lists you can import or choose from other subscribers lists. So cool! Next year, instead of BJU I am using a combo of BJU, IEW, and time4learning. What is advantageous about time4learning is that the lessons are interactive and entertaining. So my son's tends to stay focused and get through the lessons in a timely manner. While worksheets tend to make his mind wander.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

hiddenhillshomeschool

Hands-on is hands-down the best method for having a lesson "stick" for both my daughters My most active daughter sits on an exercise ball to do her work. When my daughters were younger, we'd "play" Run and Spell, a goofy game they made up. They'd stand on the starting line and I'd give them a spelling word which they had to spell correctly before they could take a quick lap around the house. As they raced by my chair, I would try to gently swat them with a dishtowel so there was this dodgeball element to the activity that they really liked...although it seems weird to write about. Homeschool. Anyway, they would tolerate a fair amount of drilling and review on their spelling and vocabulary words as they waited for me to suddenly say "go!" and get the chance to try to run past the dishtowel. Okay, so this seems totally quirky...but we also did spelling with pudding on cookie sheets. Doing schoolwork outside has always been effective. Sometimes on challenging subjects, we'd go to the library--the change of venue and a public place can be a good trick for holding your child's attention and doing a short lesson on something that might cause resistance at home. Plus there are all the books to enjoy after the lesson is complete.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Kaleay

My daughter was in 3rd grade at a private school. She was coming home saying she was dumb, as she was having trouble in her classes particularly in Math. I knew she was not dumb but she just wasn't learning the way the teacher was presenting the material. I met with the teacher and asked her to try to try other methods to help Becky learn. She replied that with the classroom size she would not adjust her methods. We had been considering homeschooling for some time, this made our decision for us. We brought Becky home the next week. After studying children's learning styles (The Way They Learn by Cynthia Tobias) I realized that Becky learned best by experiencing the material. The first subject of our homeschool day was Math. We sat on the floor with manipulatives and restarted Math from the beginning. Becky learned the basis for Math by experiencing it. She went from struggling to mastering. We applied this hands on approach to every subject. Becky was now not only learning - she was having fun at it. Jumping forward a few years. We continued homeschooling until Becky was a Junior in High School. At that time she wanted to see if she really was as smart as we said she was. She did fantastic her Junior and Senior year in high school. Becky went on to graduate Rutgers University Business School at the top of her class with a dual degree in Management and Marketing. She now works for the Prudential Foundation helping non-profits achieve amazing goals.

3 years ago · Like · Comment
Kaleay: We are back into using homeschooling techniques and resources to help our twin foster daughters overcome gaps in their education. Regrettably the school system will not allow us to homeschool so we are force to supplement during their weekends and summer.
3 years ago · Like

c2mc2

This is my first year homeschooling my eldest son, a 6th grader who's a kinesthetic learner and sensory seeker. He is also creative and tends to think outside the box. After being unsuccessful at keeping his interest and attention teaching separate curricula, we switched to thematic units, combining social studies topics with reading and writing. He's made a tri-fold lapbook for each area of ancient civilization throughout the school year. Additionally, for Ancient Egypt, he came up with the idea of creating an Egypt World in Minecraft, where he built pyramids, complete with passageways, traps, and tombs inside, and the Sphinx. In researching the social and economic aspects of the civilization, he also built and populated an Egyptian town along the Nile River. He even did a recording of a tour through his Egypt World, and took screen shots to use as graphics for his tri-fold. It put the fun back into learning!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Rakel3

My son, Josiah, is a kinesthetic learner. He needs a fast-paced, hands-on learning environment. He can focus for short periods of time, so I have broken up his subject content into smaller intervals with lots of breaks or change in study approach. For example, in math each day, he completes approximately fifteen to thirty minutes of khan academy online, grade appropriate math problems with quick rewards. Then, we do about fifteen to thirty minutes of textbook work, where I give a short lecture of explanation with visual examples, and he follows up with practicing the new skills. He gets a tic tac or piece of gum, if he finishes all of his math within one hour. We also have monthly and quarterly hands-on projects to bring the information into real life scenarios. For example, we had Josiah plan our project to build our new back yard fence. He had to find the measurements first. Then, he had to research several choices of fencing material and provide us with the pro s and con s of each choice. When, we decided together on the type of fencing material to use, he had to show us how much material we needed, based on his measurements, as well as the cost per each and the total cost of materials. He went to the store with dad to purchase the material, so he was able to check his estimates and confirm his calculations. He took part in the project from the beginning to the end, and he gained a great deal more than math knowledge from the experience.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Chelsea

I was struggling with my soon to be 3 year old this past week. We were doing match cards and she wasn't following instructions, so we switched to another task.... She wouldn't follow instructions. This was the first time I felt frustrated because so far she's been a joy. Said a little prayer, relaxed, gave her the reins and she proceeded to make a new game out of the same cards and she still got the job done! It was very Montessori-esque. I would not have realized she was capable of that kind of stretch had I stuck to my guns.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

DonnaLou

My 3 kids each having a different dominant learning style so we do a lot of unit studies. We read, we write, we do experiments, we cook food from the lands we are learning about and we take a lot of nature walks. One of the best examples of retention came when my son who is 17 now remembered doing a unit on detectives when he saw a boot print in the mud by our barn! We studied detectives when he was 8! Love home schooling my kids!!!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

loloeq

One of my boys needs to MOVE all the time. When I was teaching him to count by 5,s and 10's, I pulled out our small indoor trampoline and had him jump while counting. It totally worked!! This could be used for other things too, but figuring out how to let him move while learning was a great asset!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

dawgwife

I've discovered that I have night and day children in learning styles - just like the rest of their lives and personalities. I have a very independent learner that does better with self-paced online learning, so we have worked to incorporate more of his learning in this style. On the other hand, my second child is a social Suzie and prefers the interaction of me teaching her lessons or doing activities together with her brother. We have adjusted Math and Spelling and Reading to accommodate this, and History & Science activities fill that desire to work with a companion.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

mommyj

Learning style is the very reason I pulled my 11 yr old son w/aspergers out of public school last fall. He used to say to me, "If you have to reteach me everything when I get home anyway, why do I have to go to school first?" The three major differences for us:

1. Let him sop up anything and everything without wringing him dry with questions and writing assignments every time he learns something new. (public schools deprive our kids of that 'sponge' stage because they are too busy collecting writing samples and projects to hang on the walls and impress parents at open-house.) If you keep filling them up, eventually they will overflow and that is the beautiful and authentic expression you want!

2. Provide a syllabus and monthly schedule. My son knows exactly what assignment he has to do today as well as 3 weeks from now and the connection between the two. There is continuity that he can see and control. He's privy to the big picture - not surprised by seemingly random assignments. It pre-emptively answers the questions "why do I have to do/know this?" and "can't I do it tomorrow instead?"

3. Offer an outline, list of steps, procedures or reasons for everything! Surprisingly few things are as random as they seem. Organize and categorize to help him make sense of the world around him. Too often, public schools say, "that's an exception, just remember it." Instead of saying "write in a way that will sound good to someone else," I give him an outline to fill in and show him there is an order and purpose to writing.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Meg

My 8 learns through reading, writing, listening, drawing, and doing. She learns with every learning style - as long as learning is HER idea. I have learned to prepare several different paths we could go down with a topic, and when she runs with one, I stay one step ahead with my own reading and with materials and inspiration. It takes a lot of planning to keep up with her, but she is thriving.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

bequita

When I was in college, my brother-in-law handed me "The Way They Learn" by Cynthia Tobias, so I could know better how to study for my college classes based on my own learning style and not be so worn out in the process. Quite a few years later I found myself going back over those lessons as I began to teach my "Perfect Paul" and "Wiggly Wilma", as Cathy Duffy refers to them. My 11 yo "Perfect Paul" is content to do workbooks and read books all day. My 8yo "Wiggly Wilma" hates anything that makes her sit longer than about 15 minutes. As I began schooling her, we moved from workbooks to curriculum that used songs and movement, like Sing, Spell, Read, and Write, and Geography and Grammar Songs, with minimal workbook time needed, but maximum retention of the material. Now we're using a history curriculum that includes hands-on projects and notebooking where she can use her creativity to demonstrate what she has learned, instead of taking a test. She loves it, and gets the wiggles out too!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

mama2kids

Right now they are hands on and auditory for the most part . Visual learners as well but more auditory . I find programs that offer a book being read to them so audio component to it. I also try and get books and movies that are the same titles . Write short papers on what they see or hear is what I am implementing now. They are in 5 th grade and 3rd right now. I also read texts to them and highlight what is important . Examples would be main idea or key words to look out for . I also bought several programs so they have variety. Reading it we use different resources / library tumblebooks E-books. Storynory.com, allinonehomeschool.com. A lot of the programs are not set up for special needs kids so I have adapted my programs.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

shernandez

My daughter is an avid reader, but is not one who enjoys much else. After months of fighting with her to do her school work, I switched to using more books and a notebooking style of learning. Now, she feels like she gets to read all the time and I still feel like she is learning everything she needs to. While she still has a few traditional-style activities, using more books has made her enjoy her schooling more.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Chiquita

As young children my boys hated coloring in coloring books so I assumed that was something I did not need to include in my schooling. I soon came to realize that they loved to draw and color their own pictures. What they did not want to color was a premade picture created by someone they did not know. They now have created their own cartoon characters that they use to define vocabulary words in their Science lessons. This helps them understand the difficult science terms better and have fun while doing a mundane task.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Cmrock79

I have three children with ADHD and two of them also have ODD. I have learned many different things this past year to make it easier for concentration with less medication and better retention. I do as much hands on activities as possible. We also take frequent breaks (like between each lesson). It may only be 10-15 minutes, but it gives them a chance to burn that built up energy so they can pay attention and participate better. I have noticed in many subjects they do better with group activities. This gives them a chance to share with each other what they are learning. I've always heard "two heads are better than one", we say 4 heads are definitely better.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

annjand

For my beginning reader, it helps him keep reading if we take turns...a page or a paragraph each. He will attempt more difficult reading if he knows we're in it together!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

hiddenhillshomeschool

Hands-on! I try to remember that for either of my daughters, the best way for them to learn is to be actively engaged in the process. They learn very differently from each other (one auditory, one visual and kinesthetic), but both have learned cursive and spelling words by finger painting them in pudding, learned about helping verbs and DNA by singing, made models of everything from Native villages to the anatomy of the ear, drawn giant diagrams, and experimented on everything. I found the quality and clarity of their writing and explanations is improved if they do a hands-on activity first to master the concept. Even in tougher topics like science, having them act out how ionic bonds form, for example, solidifies their understanding.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

tgimom

Having 3 boys with 3 very different styles I learned early on that what worked for one of them wouldn't necessarily work with either of the others, I learned to be flexible and try out different methods with each. One time we were visiting a museum and I let them split up and see things at their own paces. The one that I thought wouldn't get anything out of it did the whole museum and could tell me many things he had learned! Guess he just needed to be able to go quickly through it and not get bored!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Mom23boys

My oldest son struggled with reading in the early years so we adapted by reading most of his curriculum to him. This way he stayed "caught up" with his peers in other subjects as we improve his reading skills. He still likes audio versions of most of his books and I will be honest when we "read" Tale of Two Cities for high school lit this year, he got more detail out of his audio version than his brother and I reading it!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Mom22

My 8 year old daughter has dyslexia and was stressed out of her mind in public school even with their "help." So I pulled her out in Feb. I learned she is an auditory learner, with some kinesthetic. She listens to tons of great books on DVD, I read a lot to her, she watches documentaries (which puts together auditory and visual), and I've found a reading program designed for kids like her that uses a metronome to help the brain learn to decode. She likes it! I also try to make sure we do plenty of science experiments, etc., for hands-on learning. I pulled my son out in March. He is very much a visual learner, and needs to read everything for himself. He also benefits from documentaries and enjoys hands-on activities even though it's not his primary learning style. It's been quite an adventure, but they are both healthier and happier, and making good progress.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Meggie

My daughter (4) loves to learn things through songs. We've discovered that youtube is a great resource for songs about just about everything - dinosaurs, space, butterfly life cycles etc. I think she may never be a traditional learner, which makes homeschooling the right choice for us.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

KatieT

I am homeschooling my 14 year old boy. He is an auditory and hands on learner so I read his science and history to him. He has to read his LA and Literature to himself. For science we try to incorporate as many labs as possible.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

WolfPackMom

We home-school our two girls (now tweens) and use Math-U-See to help with learning new math concepts. Both girls are visual learners (though one of them has auditory tenancies and the other has kinesthenic too). We also use a lot of DVDs from the library every day to teach science, English, math and anything else we can think of. We read about learning styles when we first started home-schooling 5 year ago. It has really helped us to understand our children and helped us help them learn!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

YellowHouseBookRental

We have four children at our "Yellow school house" Each of them are unique. Two of them do best when they write out the information they hear. One of them does not do well with distractions, All of them like to "see" what they are learning. It also depends on the subject, Each year there are challenges and blessings. Flexibility is the always the best way to teach.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

BeckyG

I have a high school visual learner and have decided that one of the best ways to select curriculum now is to have her basically select the curriculum that she feels is best suited to her learning style out of choices that I have given her.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

8redheads

I currently homeschool 5 of my children and have a toddler to boot. They are all so different! My oldest son is more of an auditory learner, and my second more of a visual learner, and they share a lot of the same material (we use a non-graded curriculum). I give them the option, when available, to either listen to or read (or a combination) the material -- mainly classic or in-public-domain books. We access a lot of audio material at librivox.org. They enjoy having the flexibility and the choice. More recently, as they have moved up into upper-level math courses, my oldest has chosen to follow a traditional textbook approach and the second has chosen an online math course. My second is very "technology-aware" and he is most motivated to learn via technology. The younger 3 homeschooled children do not show as strong of preferences as the first two, but they each have strengths and weaknesses that I adjust our curriculum choices to. My 3rd child does not like reading stories/books/etc. using animals as the characters, so I locate books that teach similar preferences without the animals. My 5th child, however, is the exact opposite :-) She is highly motivated by animal stories. My 4th child is a slower-learner but loves to work outside and build complicated Lego creations. I adjust my expectations for him to make sure he has materials that will keep his interest and allow him to work independently while not requiring him to be in a seat doing schoolwork for 4 hours.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Chiquita

I have twins 13 year old boys so you can imagine what our school days look like. Suprisingly the both love to read, and would read all day long if they could.
I guess the most interesting thing I have learned is that you have to get to know your children, find out what excites them, keeps them interested. Unfortunately that can change from year to year or even month to month. When my boys were young I planned lots of coloring actvities only to find out they hated to color.
Now when I look at curriculum I also have them look at it and give their input. If they are excited about it they will work harder to accomplish it. It is important as the teacher for you to drive the curriculum not to let the curriculum drive you. If it is not working with your students learning style adapt it or move on to something else. Just because everyone else is using it doesn't make it perfect for you and your child. It is of great importance to keep the communication open between you and your child.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Chiquita

I have twins 13 year old boys so you can imagine what our school days look like. Suprisingly the both love to read, and would read all day long if they could.
I guess the most interesting thing I have learned is that you have to get to know your children, find out what excites them, keeps them interested. Unfortunately that can change from year to year or even month to month. When my boys were young I planned lots of coloring actvities only to find out they hated to color.
Now when I look at curriculum I also have them look at it and give their input. If they are excited about it they will work harder to accomplish it. It is important as the teacher for you to drive the curriculum not to let the curriculum drive you. If it is not working with your students learning style adapt it or move on to something else. Just because everyone else is using it doesn't make it perfect for you and your child. It is of great importance to keep the communication open between you and your child.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

MelissaM

For both of my children: Son 9, Daughter 8 (I have 5ch under 9yo), I use daily devotionals with journaling as their combined reading/writing/comprehension. They are required to read a portion of Scripture, copy the scripture in cursive, journal their thoughts on the portion and draw an applicable picture. This reveals how their phonics/spelling is going too.

My Son 9 has a love for everything to do with visual. I use YouTube to find videos on different countries and cultures when learning about Geography. It motivates him to finish his paper-work lessons so he can enjoy that time. HOWEVER he is not allowed to just zone out... If he wants this 'gift', I've taught him to take notes for the essay he's required to write after he's watched the documentary.

Lastly, when ever we can, for Math - we go outside and use chalk, or draw in the sand, or measure on the field...Cooking in the kitchen has proven to be excellent with learning fractions, division (cutting the dough into portions) and multiplication. Driving places are great! We 'read' stories in the car. After going to field trips they write essays with pictures, too.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

snooko

My son prefers to be left alone with a concept so that he can figure it out on his own. He will come and ask for help if he gets stuck, but then goes away to work on it.
He is also very driven by story and narrative. He is motivated in any subject when it involves story. Absolutely any subject can become fascinating to him when there is a story wrapped around it.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

learningmama

my youngest son who is 6 is my challenging one. he is definitely a performing Paul and Paula according to the styles described here so very hyperactive, fidgety, very sharp, clever and quick. I struggle engaging him long enough for anything but he is very gifted in math and numbers. so, we integrate play and physical activity as much as poss. we learn through playing board games like monopoly, uno, dominos, and such. we bake so he learns by weighing. he loves role play so we role play subjects to get the information I need to get to him for example pet care, he wants to pretend to be the dog. When we learned what is ok and what is not ok to touch by others he was bored silly with me reading to him (while the others enjoyed being read to) so after reading each part we then role played it and he loved it and the message went through about when you say NO or what you do if someone touches inappropriately. Same for safe crossing of roads, hygiene, etc. I just have to think on my feet and try to find ways to engage and reward him (he is very competitive). We also volunteer to dog walk at the local shelter so he gets to be very physical while doing something valuable in the community.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

jennybean0305

My older child is a classical learner. She can sit and read/listen easily, and she often prefers this method. For math though, she likes to be hands on - so we use puzzles and white boards. My younger daughter does not learn well sitting and listening, so I often have her read back to me (I read to her, and she summarizes back to me), she also uses the white board, and we play games like boggle and scrabble - spanish bingo etc.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

staceorama

One of the most helpful ways I've found to teach many kiddos (one child, three, or a larger classroom for that matter) is to USE LEARNING STYLE TECHNIQUES IN COMBINATION. For instance, research indicates that we learn better when we hear about (Auditory) or discuss a subject while moving (Kinesthetic). Consider taking a walk in the park or woods while discussing a science or literacy lesson. This also gives plenty of visual stimulation! Incorporating some sort of MOVEMENT into a school day that has mixed presentations of curricula (Museum, experiment, horseback riding lesson, math worksheet, reading a book, viewing movie/show, giving a speech, writing, etc.) increases brain activity! Keep the brain guessing at what stimulation is coming next and it may just be more attentive!! :)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

melrose

My two daughters are close in age, so we are doing the same curriculum with them. However, one of them is very literal abd learns easily just by reading and memorization etc. The other one is a mover and very visual. She learns best if she is and to stand up and wiggle. Also, if she's reading, she makes notebook pages as she goes, writing definitions and drawing pictures. She also prefers to do her math on the white board.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Donna54

We've recently learning that my middle grand daughter (2 1/2) has Apraxia of Speech - it affects a child's ability to form sounds and words (Webmd). Therefore, we read a lot to her and we also try to teach her sign language. So, I guess she's a little of all three because we try to take a little of each one to help her.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

hawleykj

My 7 year old is both a visual learner and a kinestetic Lerner. My 5 year old is kinestetic and auditory.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

mountainmama

My boys are quite young, so I am discovering their learning styles, but my kindergartener adores products and remembers and saves and refers back to them, so I have tried to shift to making something (a project to build or poster or chart or something that feels like a project) as a part of the learning process for what we are working on. It seems to really stick with him that way. He also is a really focused kid, so I think I didn't think about the need for things like brain breaks with him until recently, but he is still a young boy with lots of energy, so I am trying to remember to utilize those more. He also soaks up things that are read to him, suggesting a strength as an auditory learner, so we do a lot of reading and try to find information to read about whatever he is interested in or studying.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

meganah

Write something...

5 years ago · Like · Comment

meganah

I have learned my daughter learns best by stories and videos. Since she is artistic, I have given her a pad of paper to draw on when she has to do her math and handwriting to keep her worksheets clear of drawings. Her math is best done with some kind of manipulative handy or at least a number line.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

stormnorm

My daughter has always had trouble with spelling. But when we started memorizing history facts by using songs I noticed that she could retain the information easily by just listening to the fact a few times. This led me to realize that she must be an auditory learner. Based on this discovery I decided to change her spelling curriculum to Phonetic Zoo by the Institute for Excellence in Writing. She listens to her spelling words being spelled each day she does a spelling test. It has worked really well for her. She has come very far in spelling in just one school year.
Likewise I have discovered over time that my son is a hands on learner. He has trouble memorizing his history sentences by just listening to songs. So I have him write the sentences out in a notebook. He memorizes them faster and has improved his handwriting and copying skills. Because he does not enjoy writing them out I sometimes have him pick the key words in the sentence then "write" them on the magnetic white board with magnetic letters. From just looking at those words on the white board he tries to quote the rest of the sentence from memory. It really works.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Hennypenny

I have one child that is always on the move. His motor skills are very good so I try to use manipulatives and movement as much as possible to accommodate his kinesthetic style.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

joyfulmom4

Learning how my kids learn has been one of the greatest privileges and joys or homeschooling as well as one of the greatest challenges. Each of my 4 children learn differently. As they get older I have learned to continue to see how they learn and not keep them in a box because maturity and confidence are game changers. My oldest is a girl followed by three boys (with 5 years between the oldest to the youngest) so they are tight in age. I thought my older two couldn't be more different until I started teaching my younger two. For my dd, everything came easy (other than handwriting.) I wish I had her memory and her speed of reading. My oldest ds is just as smart and learned to read at the same age but he was slower and more methodical about everything. I learned a big lesson when they were in 3rd and 1st. I tried to teach grammar to them together, my good friend had the same age spread and it worked for her so it should work for me too, right? It was a nightmare! My DD could look at a definition once and it was memorized my son had to go off on his own and work on it but even then she was so quick that he was quickly defeated and he would just give up. Neither child was really served in this environment and we switched to something that was more independent. Now these two are finishing 7th and 5th. The 7th dd is needing, for the first time, to learn how to slow down and study for harder subjects. Her temptation is (overconfidence) to just assume she knows it or skip it and move on and this gets her in trouble. My ds has learned to apply himself well in studying, ask questions when needed, and soars when confident. I am always needing to remind myself to approach them differently. My younger two sons (14mo apart) are more dramatically different, so much so that we joke that together they make the perfect man as ones weakness is the others strength. The older of the two was finally diagnosed with a reading and writing disorder that basically just said his IQ was high but his aptitude was low, so although he struggled to write what was in his head or to read- his comprehension and reasoning skill are fabulous. The younger seemed like a wiz as he did reading and math quickly but soon realized that unlike his older sister, he did not internalize things to remember or comprehend them. These two are so different that I got a tutor to help.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Momofmany9

We are currently homeschooling 5 of our 9 kids (3 are out of school already) and my youngest daughter struggled
with English, reading, even memorizing...I was challenged to be able to find just the right method to teach her, I
was recommended to Barton Reading System which uses all sensors and am amazed at her growth! Also, this
was an awesome experience, my 9th grader was working on algebra (numbers with signs), we worked
through it together according to text book, but, when it came time for my 8th grader to work on the same
type of problems she was having difficulty understanding the concept, I was able to explain algebra in terms of
actual relationships and the impact we have on each other! Not only did she grasp it but we laughed at how
easy it was when relating it to something of such importance! Thanks for listening!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Linnea

We currently find maintaining a steady rhythm helpful in supporting our dreamer's engagement. Our 'lessons' start right after breakfast when we light a candle and say a seasonal poem. We alternate between movement/games, and short times of focussed 'knowledge creation" or exploration of an idea. Our morning ends with our closing poem.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

M5

I found that if I give my (high school aged) daughter the materials and no due date, she gets her work done faster than if I set a time frame for her. She will not do her work on a regular school timetable, rather she fits it into her schedule as to make the best use of her time.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

cj

My oldest has a short attention span and needs to move around. So when he gets the wiggles and can't focus I make him do silly things - exercises, but not done normally. it can't be too silly or I can't get him back, but 10 jumping jacks waving to the sun or climbing the imaginary stairs to Jupiter is enough to get him back on track. It was amazing after my hubby suggested this how quickly he would get his work done. Before he would sit at the table for hours doing nothing. I also got a timer that he can operate himself. He loves that. It's a great motivator for him.

My younger son cannot use the timer because he worries more about beating the time then any kind of accuracy. However, he's my question boy and needs to know how everything works. He's the kid who goes to a play and spends as much or more time watching the stage and lighting crew! I've had to learn to be patient and answer all his questions because if I don't he won't come back to where I want him to be. He's 7 now and I push the question back to him and we work it out together and then we can move on. I give him manipulatives for everything. Something. Anything. The Math-U-See blocks....pencils....paper...on a bad day - jelly beans.... :-) He'll build whatever we are talking about. If he's working with his hands his brain is going.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

SherriW

My daughter has a difficult time learning anything, but she loves to draw, cut, and paint - plus she is very good at it. This year I used Eagle's Wings' natural science book - Considering God's Creation - which bills itself as "a creative biblical approach." Although the music part was goofy, the art projects throughout the material captivated my daughter's attention and taught her so much!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

beckilynt

I have a 6 year old with autism and ADHD. He's highly visual and needs to move. We do a lot of hands on activities and games. We read a lot and I'm beginning to get into learning videos and dvds. He loves to learn and soaks up information like a sponge! Love it!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

LindseyHp

I've learned that my son learns best and does his best in the mornings, whereas my daughter needs to sleep in and works best in late afternoon. Which actually works for me, I am able to be there for each of them at different times! Happy homeschooling!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

JM

My oldest loves to read about something and then do LOTS hands on activities. I have shifted from worksheets to more of the unit studies concept and he is retaining more than he used to in the past.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Heather.T

I am just starting out with my two kids, but I am quickly realizing they will be learning much differently from each other. My oldest needs to move and talk and fidget. There's no way I could ever ask her to sit still. And my youngest is going to need her own space and do things on her own time and pace. One likes competition and fast moving, and the other would do very poor in that situation. I'm so thankful that I can tailor their schooling and learning experiences to the way that they need.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Heather.T

I am just starting out with my two kids, but I am quickly realizing they will be learning much differently from each other. My oldest needs to move and talk and fidget. There's no way I could ever ask her to sit still. And my youngest is going to need her own space and do things on her own time and pace. One likes competition and fast moving, and the other would do very poor in that situation. I'm so thankful that I can tailor their schooling and learning experiences to the way that they need.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Nikkip

I have been homeschooling my three boys for eight years now. I started when my older two were in first and third grade. I bought the same curriculum for them both at their grade level. The math is where I first started seeing the different learning styles emerge. One child loved the standard, traditional math format and repetition of the curriculum while the other child would cry and drag his feet. I soon realized that my reluctant child could do simple math in his head very quickly and was beyond the math that we had "learned". So once I saw I had a child who understood math but really hated repetition I began seeking out a new math curriculum for his learning style. Also another point is if I have him just one of those problems to do he would do it quickly and without any crying, he just couldn't handle all the problems on the page and so many of the same problem in traditional math textbooks. So I found a math curriculum that is simple looking and is mainly word problems. My younger son has learned very well with this style of learning. I also found with reading that my older son enjoyed and still enjoys reading while my younger child does not. The older child learns well and prefers to learn on his own by reading. My younger son prefers to see and feel real things. Now that my children are in their teens I continue to use their learning styles to guide me in making my curriculum choices. It would be easier on me if I just choice the same for both but it would not be nearly as beneficial for them. This is one of the main reasons I began homeschooling and I always want to remember that. I am determined to give my children an individualized education so that I can help them improve their weaknesses and more importantly to encourage their strengths.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Donna J

I always home schooled my kids and my daughter finished at 15 and is now doing her college classes. I found that with both my kids they learned very differently. My son would take the whole week of assignments and just go to work, were as my daughter could only take one day at a time because the weeks work seemed to overwhelm her. Mostly it just took time to find the best way for each of them

6 years ago · Like · Comment

shelleyw

We just started homeschooling March of this year. I have twin 8 year-old boys and though they use the same curriculum one works at the table sitting on a fluffly pillow with a rolling pin under his feet and the other works on his bed. When they get antsy they do jumping jacks, pushups, situps, ride their bikes, run laps around the house. When we are doing a project we split up the activities mostly on a volunteer basis between us all, so that they do the parts that fit their interests and styles the most.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

amazed homeschool mom

We started homeschooling last September, my 8 year old in second grade needed to write a "complete" sentence. After 15 minutes of moving constantly on the chair and having nothing on paper I said "come on is not that hard write something about a cat like -the cat is big-" I said.
She felt my frustration and all of a sudden, she got up and started to jump on the trampoline. "Come back here it is not time to play", I said, she remained quiet and kept on jumping for a few more seconds and then she said with enthusiasm "I got it mom!" her sentence was something like "I have a beautiful cat, he likes to play, he is fuzzy and cute. I love my cat". I was surprised and humbled. After 5 more "jumping" sentences and skip counting I admitted how wrong I had been all these years. All the time in preschool and kindergartner I thought she just needed more discipline, but all she needed was movement!. :) Thank God for homeschooling!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

LisaKni

I have 4 children and with them comes a variety of learning styles. I have discovered that for their learning, I cannot put them all in the same box. For example, I have a middle child who is a natural math guy and does not need much explanation. In fact for his Singapore Math 4B he rarely used the textbook. Just worked through the workbook and finished fine. (He also figures many of the answers in his head faster than I can compute them on paper!) My oldest son is very hands on, so we have switched to Math-U-See and he is a much happier math camper! His older sister (my oldest) does not want to have anything to do with MUS and will be using Teaching Textbooks for Pre-Algebra and up (at least that is the plan.) Finally, I have a wiggly 7 year old who is finishing up Singapore 1B. He is a no frills guy who wants to get his school done so he can play (or avoid doing school all together if he could get away with it.) Soooo - while I initially dreamed of all of them doing the same curriculum, and much of it together, I have had to learn to be flexible, especially in the area of math. This may carry over to language arts as well as my math guy prefers/does well with work books and independent work.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

HmskoolMom

Having my quirky, going-against-the-norm daughter home with me has allowed me to tailor her schooling to her equally quirky learning style. She's very into anime and Japanime and I've been able to find many resources within those categories that help strengthen what she already knows and guide her to learn what she does not. This means book work, but also a large number of videos (including games) that incorporate all things she loves with all the things she needs to learn.

It really is that simple for us.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

joyfulheart

The learning style test really opened my eyes. I like to read in a quiet room to learn. My son likes music and talking while he is learning. He is a performer and an inventor. Ideas and humor are always in his head. So I have learned that being funny is who he is and how he is wired and he is not being disrespectful and disruptive. I have learned to love his humor and added it to learning. His attitude has totally changed. No more long talks as to "why" he has problems with math. He just does it. We use humor when we do chores together and surprise! I enjoy them better too. We now look for fun things to incorporate like a fun subject to write about or a way to do a math problem that lets him be creative. He is a much more pleasant person and so am I. He is also learning much faster.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

notetodarla

I have discovered that if I let my four kids work on things that they are personally interested in, they will miraculously learn and maintain much more! Of course they have to still do things that they don't "love", but for example, if I can gear math, writing, or reading to be anything dealing with animals, then my reluctant learner will go leaps and bounds above what I would have thought! If I let my oldest daughter have a textbook and let her work independently, they she does best....They are all so different!!!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

FieldsofGrace

Short and sweet...to adjust to my 2 oldest children, who have very different learning styles, I choose totally different curriculums for them. When I first started about 12 years ago, I was on a fixed schedule with a specific curriculum, etc. Now, years later, I've learned that if they are going to learn well, I need to learn how to adjust to their style of learning and not have them adjust to my style of teaching! Both of my oldest children are now excelling academically because I learned to make the switch! I plan to do the same with my 2 youngest who are at pre-school level...

6 years ago · Like · Comment

eeejunesgirl

With 6 kids we have such a wide variety of ways that each child learns. In an effort to be able to reach each and every one of them we try to include a variety of ways to learn the material. Not only do we read the lesson, we also talk about it, turn it into puppet shows/a play/a TV show (cardboard boxes work great for this!). We also spend time up and active WHILE learning....jumping jacks while repeating core lessons or turning the lesson into a game. The older kids like to take the material and make it into plays, board games, and my oldest will turn it into a video game on occasion that the whole family can enjoy.

Then to really make sure each child "got it" that evening at dinner we discuss what we learned for the day. This also gives Dad a chance to see what is going on during our learning time each day. I have found that giving them the chance to talk about what they learned...while "teaching" it to someone else is a great way to drive it home. And when Dad gets told he gets to ask questions so that he can really understand our lessons as well. When your 4 yr old can explain the chemical reaction between baking soda & vinegar from our volcano *explosion* then I know she "got it"!

We, as parents, have to be willing to being open to offering a variety of opportunities to let our children take what they learn & re-vamp it into something that they can then turn around & show us in order to see that they grasped the lesson. Personally, I have found that making ANY lesson a hands-on lesson and giving ownership of that lesson to each child individually (or as a group) that they tend to get more out of it! I have especially enjoyed the days when the kids teach each other the lessons because their imaginations are so vivid that they come up with great ideas that really help each other out!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

sweetpea

I've changed the curriculum for my daughter to fit her learning style and will do the same for my son next year. They are both avid learners and readers. My son has learned from his sister's 4th grade Math and I give him the next year's level workbooks to use as he wants. We take regular trips to the library and I also place Holds on items they are interested in and series they want to read. I use multi-media for their schooling and we sometimes change the location we work.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Kata Mom

Homeschooling has been a true gift. My children are both very bright stealth dyslexics with very different needs. The brick and mortar school they were in tried to be supportive but had NO clue how to teach them and NO clue they were dyslexic. After an independent assessment and making the momentous decision to pull them from school I still had to figure out how to teach them myself. Long journey but well worth it:
1. Both children do better if I have certain things they can pick up and do independently right when we first get up in the morning if I am busy getting bills paid, etc. I took the Math on the Level concept of brief 5 a Day reviews of math concepts already known and now apply it to other topics as well. Great for reinforcing concepts already known and for giving them a sense of accomplishment right at the beginning of the day.
2. Next, I read to them from a novel (usually a fairly thick one that will take us several days or weeks to complete) while they paint, draw or play with clay, which gives us some bonding time and a fun, relaxed, beginning to the morning while giving them mental and visual/physical stimulation without the pressure of trying to read on their own. They are better focused and in a better mood to begin "school" after this.
3. Son learns best through "narrating" everything he is learning out loud while he learns it so I need to be nearby to give him someone to bounce his ideas and questions off of, but it drives sister nuts so we do the narrating while she is occupied with art or cleaning her room or listening to music.
4. Son's assessment showed he functions way below grade level with black and white paper, but funtions way above grade level with color (never noticed this because I didn't know what to look for) so now we try to have as many things with color as possible (even if I have to color a few things on the page). We also have a big dry erase board with lots of colored markers for him to work out his ideas, confusions, etc. He can talk through concepts as he draws out problems, answers questions, etc. It has made a tremendous difference.
5. Daughter does better with quick explanations (not too wordy), lots of visual and/or physical examples and to be left alone with those examples to figure out patterns. She also needs me to read thick text to her because of the difficulties of her dyslexia, but then she still needs to have quiet to study it again afterwards on her own.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

momtip2

I have two teenage daughters and they are complete opposites. My first born is extremely independent. I give her a schedule at the beginning of the week and she diligently works to complete each daily task until her week is completed. I then go back and check her work. We discuss any new concepts and work on any challenges she may have encountered. She's done and ready for next week's work.
My second born just turned 13 and she is just beginning to want to work on her own. She has always needed me to sit right beside her to keep her on task. She can become very frustrated with new concepts so she needs frequent breaks. I learned early on, in our homeschooling adventure, to let her take several small breaks during her day. Her breaks include going outside to shoot the basketball, running around the house, exercising, playing with her babies or maybe listening to some relaxing music. She uses several leaning styles including seeing, hearing and touching. She needs to experience learning on many levels in order for a concept to stick.
My second born also has an auditory processing disorder and was mixed dominant when we began homeschooling. It took several years for me to pinpoint her needs and to find the help we both needed to effectively teach her so she can learn. She is not at grade level yet but she has made huge progress.
It has been very easy teaching my firstborn and there are times when I feel I don't do much teaching as she seems to just teach herself. It has been very challenging teaching my second born as I have had to figure her out as we've gone along and I've had to come up with many creative ways for her to learn.
I love homeschooling for the very reasons listed above. Homeschooling has given me the opportunity to understand how my two children learn and to tailor their learning program to fit their learning styles.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Snohomish Mama of 4

Teaching children at home is such a beautiful way to discover how each child learns! I have four kids. Two of them are similar and the other two are similar! It's been amazing watching them each grow and become unique individuals, stretching their limbs because they were not confined to a box. All of my kids like some kind of direction or parameters so I do give each one a schedule of what needs to be done each week. How fast or slow they go is up to them. My daughter tackles her assignments with gusto and pride and wants to get everything done right away. No procrastination here! This makes her an easy homeschool student! She learns visually and audibly. My 2 oldest boys like to see what they need to do and would like me to just write down what they need to do each day and get it done. My oldest is more visual, my 2nd son is more auditory. My youngest son, however, has been the most different in how he learns. Whatever he learns has to be in the context of REAL. Nothing fake or made up. Real stories, true facts, nature, space, animals ... truth. Taking that into consideration, he does NOT do well with worksbooks and paper and pen all the time. So I try to do unit studies with him. Right now we are doing Astronomy. He is writing his own planet book, doing research, etc. Fractions and measuring come in when designing and cutting his book and placing his cutouts or words. It's real math. Spelling, grammar - it's all in there! He's learning about distances, rotations, spacial awareness - all great math skills. He's charting the differences between the planets .... you see where I'm going with all this. THIS is how he learns and he absorbs it so fast. I am so glad I homeschool! Allowing their creativity and strengths to develop and grow is healthy and it makes them strong, confident, knowledgeable kids. Taking the time to understand your child's learning style makes homeschool a breeze!!!!!

6 years ago · Like · Comment
Jada P: I agree! Well said! I think that was the hardest thing for me having my kids in public school was that they were herded like cattle. I'm not bashing the school because it would be impossible to allow 30 kids in one classroom to express themselves!!! BUT at home, I totally agree that it gives the kids such confidence and strength as they find their own path. I will never be sorry I decided to homeschool.
The Jess Man likes this. · 6 years ago · Like
The Jess Man: Excellent point. My boys like to jump on the trampoline while I shoot out "trivia" questions. It's a great way to get in history or science facts or work on multiplication drills or even states and capitals. They get exercise and have fun but learn retain what they learn. I think my kids are happier kids because they are allowed, as you said, "to stretch their limbs." So true.
3 people like this. · 6 years ago · Like
Snohomish Mama of 4: I'm so glad you are experiencing this, too! I agree - no need to bash public schools. I'm just grateful for the right to homeschool. and Jess Man, funny you should mention that! I do the same thing with my kids. I also toss out trivia questions while they are jumping on the trampoline! too funny! It works like a charm, though. Great ideas!
Rick M. likes this. · 6 years ago · Like

Angels Kisses

In our new venture as a homeschool family we have just started learning about our learning style differences. I have twin 8 yr old daughters. We began schooling at home only a few months ago. I believe that we will be in a pattern of trying new strategies to find a good fit for some time.
One of the girls excels beyond her grade level while her sister is struggling to catch a breath. In the midst of this struggle, I have felt incredibly overwhelmed at times. However...we have recently begun modifying assignments. I only began this following a heart to heart with big sister (by a whole 45 seconds) about how difficult it has been for her sister. She was incredibly empathetic and supportive.
We are currently learning about the differences in our learning styles (myself included) and gaining hope for success. We completed learning style assessments that have shed light on what had previously appeared such an impossible task with a bleak outcome.
Little sister has begun bringing a stuffed friend to the table that becomes her confidant and companion when learning new styles. I have begun doing more oral work with her especially. We have selected specific target lessons and adapted the work load to become less overwhelming as well as 'building' privacy for her by using a tri-fold display (like for science projects) and letting her create the unique environment she would like to have by coloring, adding little treasures and positive phrases that encourage her to enjoy her work more. (of course her sister has one as well) We also have begun to always have one or the other in headphones-that way she/we can talk through her work easier.
This is definitely process for us all. I am constantly researching new (different) ideas. We are working to find books that are not only visual but audio as well. We dance our way through spelling and sing our way through instructions. We make up songs or poems that help us remember what we have learned and have begun Notebooking as well. I have found that for us, varying the time schedule and subject order so that they are not working on the same thing at the same time has been priceless. Most importantly, I pray continually for guidance as how best to reach BOTH of my special girls.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

jen p

Discovering my kids' learning styles was a huge turning point. They are completely different, but they are both good listeners IF they are allowed to listen according to their learning styles. Else it is a constant battle to get through a single lesson. I switched over to LOTS of audiobooks, radio shows, educational songs, and audio recordings, etc. so that one kid could sit still in a corner and listen while my other kid could draw or play legos or turn cartwheels if he needs to.

One child performs best in the morning so we do one-on-one activities first thing in the morning (I'm usually still in my PJs in my bed!). The other learns better in the afternoon and evenings, so I do one-on-one with him closer to bedtime.

One child does well with structured curriculum and schedule and likes to plow through the work until it is done. The other likes more variety and needs lots of breaks, so I only require him to do Group Work at a set time (built around snack times) and he has the freedom to do his other subjects anytime during the day (or night) as long as it gets done.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Kata Mom

My daughter likes to do art work while we discuss things. She sees in pictures instead of words and the artwork helps her focus. I just leave several different types of art supplies (everthing from paint to clay to popsicle sticks, etc.) on the table and she chooses what works best for her at that moment. She also does better if I discuss something with her, show her whatever needs to be shown (such as math problems or a video) then leave her alone with her art supplies to think over what we've been learning before she has to write or test on something. Frequently, even though she is nearly 13 now, she will go outside to swing while she listens to music and thinks about what we learned in the morning, then I review the material with her in the afternoon. The swinging motion and being outside seem to revitalize her after a long morning and she comes back better focused and having a thorough understanding what was done that morning.

My son needs to talk everything out as he is learning, and he also needs to move around so we have a punching bag, an individual trampoline and balls and bean bags around for him to use while we discuss whatever he is learning. He does better if I give a brief introduction, show him examples then ask him questions instead of "lecturing" the detailed information. Then I give him the chance to "talk out" what he is thinking before I provide feedback. He sometimes looks like an unfocused, hyeractive little chatterbox to an outsider, but time and again this method has proven extremely effective for his retention and critical thinking skills. He also does MUCH better if something is in color, but hates doing any coloring. For pages that are striclty black and white (I try to avoid those but not always possible), my daughter and i will color a few items on the page before he uses them. It give us something fun to do together and helps him, too.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Michigan Mom

I discovered early on that my daughter was a kinesthetic learner. One way it was manifested was that she always had to be moving. I purchased a large exercise ball that she sat on (in place of the chair) while at the table to do her school work. This allowed her to make subtle movements as she sat on the ball yet stay focused on her work. Her penmanship actually improved employing this method!

It is interesting to note that this now 17 year old daughter stands to do much of her school work--a result of researching and writing a paper for a school assignment about the health benefits of standing versus sitting:)

6 years ago · Like · Comment
Kata Mom: I like the exercise ball idea. I have heard of this for office workers but hadn't seen it used with children. I will try this.
6 years ago · Like

lynn

My son is an action-based learner, so we use stone pebbles for helping him understand math concepts. He learned his skip-counting facts through a hopscotch game I made up. He For spelling, he types the words on the computer to learn them. When he reads, he often enjoys swinging at the same time.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

chocodog

Write something... I try to make up games that include movement. It also goes along with our time era we are studying. I will make an activity like a grammar game. Sometimes we will put nouns or verbs on the floor and play bean bags. Throw the bags on two words and make a sentence describing those words telling whether they were the noun or the verb. Then move on to harder grammar like adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, ect... This can also be used with our vocabulary words and make up a history sentence that we are studying. This is a good twist to make it all come together.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

thezwomann

I try to vary the locations and modes of learning on a daily basis (I even made a checklist for myself so that I'm sure to do at least one game, one video, one project, etc. every week to supplement the book learning). He's mostly auditory, so, for example, I will read stories out loud to him while he colors story-related pictures. When I ask him the review/comprehension questions, he always gets them right. I'm amazed. We also invested in a large white board (DIY project with shower backer board), and that has helped with visualizing.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Redeemingtheloveoflearning

I consider learning style to incorporate more than just visual, auditory and kinesthetic. With my own kids and my clients, we consider both their personality and the way they process information best (more like learning styles you're familiar with), and design a learning plan based on their interests and future goals. It creates a very motivating learning environment!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

lillybell

I have a tactile kinesthetic learner and we do such things as lapbooks for history or just about any subject we can use them on. We were recently learning about explorers so we did a lapbook for that then in addition to that, I had a children's script for a play about Christopher Columbus and the queen of Spain so her sister has been helping her with the lines so they can act it out for me. For science, we do a lot of hands on activities and really love the TOPS Learning system since those experiments are pretty hands on. We have also used History Pockets. Baking activities are also included. We recently covered prepositions and it helped a lot to have her listen to the preposition song while she did other activities. Eventually she picked up the song and had them memorized in no time. After spelling test, I have her use her fingers to spell out the incorrect word correctly in the air or I have her write it in sand. Writing them in chalk on the porch has also helped. Those are just some of the ways that I adated my teaching techniques to her learning style.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

loveoflearningmom

The most important lesson I've learned about guiding my kids through learning is to help them understand themselves. This is more important than my setting up a curriculum that meets their learning style. Helping children know what works best for them - what types of learning inspire them - and what conditions/activities hinder them - is the best lesson we, as parent educators, can offer our children. Like many parents, I have identified what helps/hinder my kid's learning. But helping them reach that level of self-awareness is the pinnacle of all learning. My children have SPD, so they know that if they are going to be able to function at their best, they need to avoid places/activities that are overly stimulating. We even make a point of seeking out sensory friendly plays. They also learn to listen to their bodies, and tackle hard tasks when they are well rested and feeling at their prime. We also intersperse a lot of physical activity throughout the day to keep their bodies and minds functioning at their best. And the kids have also learned what activities to do to help alleviate the inevitable stress that builds up, such as playing an instrument or listening to audio books. And most importantly, they have learned to listen to what their minds and bodies need so that learning is a joy, not a chore.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: We do something similar but call it a "toolbox" and when they get frustrated they are allowed 10 minutes to excuse themselves and go do a toolkit activity. But teaching them to know when they are reaching frustration before they explode was the key to this working. Kuddos to you for figuring that out first! It took me years & lots of counseling sessions to figure this out.
7 years ago · Like
loveoflearningmom: Precisely... Thanks for your comments. It may be eccentric thinking, but I believe my children's self-awareness and mindfulness is paramount. Without that, no amount of academic success will matter.
eeejunesgirl likes this. · 7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: I don't think it's eccentric at all. You hit the nail on the head - self awareness is key to success in anything any of us want to succeed at. If we don't teach our kids to be able to "read" their bodies/minds then we are doing nothing more than creating little robots that are just doing what they are "trained" to do. I wish our public school systems would pick up on that - think of how many more kids would be successful in life if they knew themselves and how to read themselves! We would have a nation of "super" kids. Yet another reason I am so thankful I chose to home school my kids...after seeing them struggle at a public school for years - in just 1 year of home schooling I was able to see my kids excel past anything that they would have done had I left them in a public school.
7 years ago · Like
jen p: Excellent!
6 years ago · Like

flmedicmom

We have 3 girls at home that are still in school, and we have 2 boys that graduated from public school. Through those years of parenting I learned a lot about trying to make them conform to what I thought I was supposed to do as a parent. Our oldest son did very well and served his time sitting in a classroom without many troubles. He learned a lot of information while there, but his character did not have continuous guidance that he needed. He is now 23, no desire for college, yes he is working now, but he had a difficult time transitioning into adulthood. He learned very well how to "get around" responsibilities and to hide behind a computer, or cell phone instead of communicating face to face. I love our son very much and he did very well in school, but talk about unsocialized--here you go :) Our younger son (now 20) has always beat to a different drum. He was always the child that had to try everything atleast once, a kinestetic learner from the very beginning. He has always been very energetic and had trouble with attention. I avoided meds for many years, and I finally gave in and conformed to the schools wishes to medicate him during the school year. He was better able to concentrate, but he also suffered many of the side effects that went along with meds (weight gain, dazed look, dulled spirit, insomnia -a whole range over the years) He quit taking the meds when he was in Jr High and the struggle to get him to conform to sitting in his seat, not talking, not moving around, not doodling or tapping was a daily battle again. He chose to do FVS along with public school and working PT so he could finish and graduate on time and the school board told him NO. This NO then helped him decide that he would drop out when he turned 18. I was racing against time and at the advice of guidance councelors I withdrew him from public school and signed him up for adult education on a high school track. It took him a little longer, but he made it to graduation. This child struggled for many years of school and he really wanted to graduate....such a rewarding time to see him achieve this goal. I began homeschooling our two girls while he was attending adult ed, and he would have been so much better off if he had this same opportunity.
The three girls at home now all have different learing issues too. Our 15 year old has had several brain surgeries that have redifined "normal" for her. I do not consider her a struggling learner like she was labeled in public school. She started school at 3 years old (due to her disablility) she was in Early Intervention until she graduated that and entered kindergarten. We kept her in public school until she was going to "graduate" and be promoted to the Middle School. She was working below level in all subjects and being promoted because she had already been retained once. I didn't know where to begin, but I knew that I wanted to find where she was at and build from there. God has a plan for each of us and only He knows the final outcome. I was surprised to find that she was working at a 1-5th grade level depending on her interest and retention. We have had so many changes in family dinamics (two international adoptions) in these past 2 years that we have not stuck to any particulat curriculum or schedule. Unschooling as I would consider it...has been our pattern I guess. Our 11 year old struggles with frustrations in learning. She was labeled as LD in Russia and trying to learn to read and with math, Bible study and Awana I also see these difficult areas. I hope to get or make more materials for visual learning over the summer to help her. Our 9 year old came to us with many fears and anxieties just this past December. She too was labeled as LD, but we discovered very quickly that she is NOT LD, infact she is very bright and is already learning to read and write in English while maintaining her Russian as well. She has vision problems that she now has glasses for and the anxieties are being worked thru with love and adjustment as well as a very mild medicine...she is learning how to calm herself and get thru the tough times.
We have all embraced the new culture that our two youngest brought into the family and we have learned much about life in Russia and orphanage living. This in itself has been great for the girls to learn, the geography, the airlines, the money differences,, language, diet, cooking, recipes, weather etc. We have done fundraising, orphan awareness, volunteer work etc to help promote Gods love of orphans...and all of this is family projects and therefore learning experiences for all. We have rebuilt an RV from frame to roof, gardening, remodelled a bathroom, painted...all sorts of hands on activities that include language, math, behavior mngmnt, carpentry skills, time mngmnt, common sense, sense of humor, trust, character building and so much more that I don't even think about. When we have not been busy with projects we do start our morning with Bible Study and Desi and I take turns reading and the younger girls repeat after me. I have seen this help with pronunciation as well as given opportunity to share the Gospel. We have used computer time as a free time activity as well as Netflix, but they must be learning activities that are chosen. Starfall, PBS Kids, Time4Learning, IXL...several diffent free programs or Free trials excite the kids and allow me to have a few minutes to do chores or work with another child. I am by far much bussier now than I ever was as a "working mother"! We just attended our 1st Homeschool Convention at the Gaylord Palms Resort and my husband has already told me to make sure we can attend the entire conference next year. I am looking forward to starting a Learning to Read curriculum for the two youngest( from Christian Light) when we "officially" begin school again in the fall, and their 1st and 3rd grade math curriculum as well. I need daily direction to keep myself on track and this looks like it will be a great place to start. I also plan on using Apologia's Who is God series for children 6-14. This is a parent lead program that will work for all 3 at the same time and that is exactly what I was looking for. I find that each child is interested in what the other is doing, and they want to help each other and also to challenge each other. We are a network of Gods handiwork and I am so blessed to be given such a great opportunity to learn and grow with our family.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Sadly our public school system is so quick to attach labels on our children. I have found that while a doctor may put the "ADHD" label on some of my kids....that label does NOT define him in any way, shape, or form....each of us are individuals and we each learn differently! Even if you happen to fall under the being a "visual" learner that even they can benefit from using similar tools that you would use for a tactile learner. Sometimes it depends on the situation.

If I have learned nothing else from home schooling my kids - I HAVE learned that each child is an individual and as they grow older they learn better through different methods. Key is being adaptable & observe your child - if you see them struggling then introduce other methods until you find what works for THAT situation...it may not always work for other situations.

I am thankful that I have this chance to be able to teach my children from home. Even though they are all "cut from the same cloth" they are individuals and I have been given a chance to get to know them as individuals, which has resulted me in being able to adapt to their best learning styles and they are far ahead of the game just because they get that one-on-one chance that they just aren't capable of providing in a classroom of 25+ students!

I hope you aren't beating yourself up over the struggles over your older boys - you did the best you could with what you had at the time, you trusted in the system that was put in place to educate our children, sadly many of us are now learning that the system is majorly flawed and due to that, our children are suffering. Be thankful you have been successful at doing your best. And congrats to your son for pushing through & getting a diploma even without the assistance of the school that failed him when it shouldn't have.
7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: Something else I just thought of for your 11 yr old - make sure you go through the Co-op and look at some of the programs that they have. I have found TONS of websites that cater to visual learners. Many of them are game-like, but VERY engaging and educational. JumpStart is a REALLY good one. And depending on her math level we've been using the Your Teacher.com site and my kids have soared in their math lessons since we started! There are lots of website that have videos based on specific methods (You Tube is invaluable there) so that the "teacher" will literally walk your child through what they are supposed to learn. My visual learners have gotten a lot out of it vs. me trying to show them how to do it. I highly rec. the Click N' Kids programs for spelling & reading....they have been fabulous for my little ones. Sounds like you have your hands full of lots of little blessings & are doing well with them! Best of luck in the future!
7 years ago · Like
flmedicmom: thanks for your suggestions. I do look at most of the co-op offerings and we usually try the free trials to see how each child responds to them. Our 11 year old either quits working and shuts down, or just guesses some off the wall answer if she doesn't know. I explain to her that all I ask is for her to really try and not to worry about it, becasue Mom is not going to give up on her but it is my "job" to figure out something that does work for her.
7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: My 15 yr old is very similar to that - the shutting down/guessing when he hits that frustration level as well. If you haven't done so yet - try that learning styles "test" that is being offered for $3 - while I had my kids pegged in most areas it helped me uncover some other info that I have started to put in place that have helped him. The biggest challenge is in getting him to realize that when he's getting frustrated that he needs to #1 - ask for help & #2 sometimes take a break away from what he's working on then come back to it & #3 do it in small increments (sometimes they get overwhelmed at a "laundry list" of things to do and by breaking it into smaller pieces it doesn't appear to be as much on the list - that has helped one of my kids, but doesn't work with all of them)....You are facing more challenges than most and you have the right attitude about it. Just keep up that unconditional love. One day you'll see that light bulb "click" in her head and she'll fly after that. It sounds like you have it down....Best of luck!
7 years ago · Like

lafarmer

I am new to this but have discovered my daughter is a visual learner. At school she had trouble with comprehension and math. I have adapted her school program to include a text reader for her harder subjects, allow a calculator to help with math and we work on mastering concepts rather than memorization. One thing I have done to help her with following directions is to integrate her volunteering at the local nursing home into her school work. Twice a week on Tuesday and Thursday she works at our local nursing home for 4 hours each day. She has a plan she has to follow to get "credit" for the day. She reads to the patients, helps them by painting their nails, runs the "Bingo Social" and writes about her experiences at the end of the day in a special journal. Her coordinator, Tamela, helps me by "grading" her on a short sheet that I add to her portfolio that has the week's objectives and how well she did with each concept. By tying her love for volunteering into her school and a visual based curriculum I found at Time 4 Learning, she is beginning to make progress much faster than I ever imagined. When I pulled her out of school she was reading at a middle 3rd grade level in 6th grade. In just 3 months, she has improved and is testing at nearly a 5th grade level. Her confidence has blossomed too. This was a good move to homeschool. She also participates in a vocabulary site called freerice.com where she gets to earn 10 grains of free rice for every vocabulary word she answers correctly. She loves helping others so any activity where I can tie serving others with her lessons is a winner for her.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I absolutely LOVE how you have tied the volunteering in with the school work! While I have my kids do volunteer work I hadn't thought to tie the two in together. GREAT suggestion!
7 years ago · Like

CatB

This has been my first year homeschooling my 9yr old DD. We started with curriculum based but I found we need more flexability to be able to go out and do more hands on things.
Also, by putting the subjects she has the hardest time retaining unless we do it daily I make sure she does first, then the classes that I feel are the next most important, then the ones that I felt were a bit redundant I'd leave for the end and if we got to it good, if not it didn't matter too much.
We still had some problems getting things done. So I told her she is limited to 4 hours a day, breaks, meals and snacks don't count. I go by 15 minute increments and keep track in a ruled notebook.
It's been 2 months since I started that and we've managed to get through every class with time to spare normally. So I let her play learning games on the computer or something else that she has been wanting to work on.
Now that her friends are on Summer Vacation and we're still catching up I let her spend the rest of the day with some friends.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I have had similar experiences myself. Those breaks are something many don't think about. I sometimes have the kids doing jumping jacks during some lessons. The ones that fidget seem to benefit best from being allowed to do short lessons mixed with short times of activity. Do you follow the "regular" school year calendar? I did that at first and then realized that every day I immerse the kids with learning in some form or another, so we've switched to a year round school program so that we spend less time each day covering lessons - and it helps to open time for field trips and other hands on activities that help drive home what they learn. For it being just your first year it sounds like you are on the right track! Being observant of your child is the key to unlocking her full potential! Keep up the good work!!!!
7 years ago · Like
CatB: I'm going for year-round. We "fell behind" because of trying to get it together so it worked for us. Plus we took extra time off for holidays and a big family trip. I looked ahead in her books (especially history in the Americas) and we visited some of the places it talked about in her books. There were some places I wanted to explore more but, unfortunately, we were on a bit of a time schedule with when we had to be back. We might do a longer trip next time, especially if we'll be in the Capitol area. :-) Tons of things to see and do!
7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: I'm planning a trip to the capitol with the whole family within the next year or two. So much to see & do there that can be tied into their history lessons! Sometimes I think maybe living in an RV would be fun just so we can go and actually see the places we're studying! So jealous that you have been able to do that! lol Even though it's only been a year - it sounds like you have a go-getter attitude and I'm willing to bet she'll be not only up to speed, but flying past where she would have been if left in a brick & mortar school....my kids sure have & it's been the best feeling in the world for both them & me. You'll figure out what works best - don't be afraid to play around with it and try different things - you'll be amazed at what you discover! :)
7 years ago · Like

tmhinton

Wow, there are so many great posts on this. I have learned so much. As far as our learning style, I have recently discovered that my daughter is, I believe, an auditory learner. This discovery is changing our way of homeschool is conducted. Since currently, I am only actually schooling her, as our other is a toddler, it means that I am doing a lot of research on books and styles that will work for her. Our biggest road block is Math. As we try to discover the best way to learn math as an auditory learner, we are trying many things. I have found that, especially in subjects that she needs to read, and not "hear," the short lessons we are switched to in utilized the Charlotte Mason approach seem to be helpful. I think as an auditory learner, it is most difficult for her to engage in lessons that are not auditory. However, this is an advantage of a literature based approach to learning when I am reading books to her. This switch has been good. As far as math, we are continuing to explore. I read her problems, I mix up the books, workbooks, computer, and board problems so as to not lose her attention and continue to explore ways to help her still love learning and not become frustrated.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
lafarmer: You would really enjoy the Time4Learning series. I chose it first of all because the cost is $19.95 a month. The classes are very visual and use audio as well as visuals to teach. The lessons are fun for Carrie and hold her attention. Most lessons are 10 minutes or less in length which is great when your DD has ADD.
eeejunesgirl likes this. · 7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: I've found You Tube (of all places) to have some wonderful math "lessons" that have been very helpful in engaging my auditory learner. They are fairly short lessons and the "teacher" really engages the "student" in what they are learning...best of all is it doesn't cost a dime! I use to spend hours reading & reading & reading (especially when it came to math - and while he would grasp it he never could really retain what he was learning) - since using videos like You Tube I have watched him not only "get-it" but also retain what he's learned from the lessons. I haven't read up on/tried the Charlotte Mason approach - but will definitely look into it after hearing you've had success with it!
jen p likes this. · 7 years ago · Like
jen p: Mine does well with chanting or songs. Especially Schoolhouse Rocks and the Math u see songs. With math facts I make him say it out loud and he tends to say them in a certain cadence. Sometimes auditory learners also learn by hearing themselves so he reads outloud too.
6 years ago · Like

mom2fiveand1

I wrote several blog posts about how I teach my children who have all different learning styles. Since the posts are rather long, I will just link to them below:

http://www.academyofthegoodshepherd.blogspot.com/2011/03/learning-styles-1.html
http://www.academyofthegoodshepherd.blogspot.com/2011/04/learning-styles-2.html
http://www.academyofthegoodshepherd.blogspot.com/2011/04/learning-styles-3.html

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I'm definitely going to add Discovering Your Child's Learning Style to my summer reading list! I have to say I think it's great that you stress that we need to not only cater to their learning styles, but also that we need to get them comfortable with other learning styles. So true! And I can totally sympathize - I have 5 of my 6 kids that I home school and each one of them is completely different! I really enjoyed reading your blog & have bookmarked it to visit again!
jen p likes this. · 7 years ago · Like

happybutterfly

I have a girl that is a visual learning. One of the way that I encourage her in the History class is asking her to make a draw to explain what does she read.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

happybutterfly

I have a girl that is a visual learning. One of the way that I use to encourage her in our

7 years ago · Like · Comment

happybutterfly

I have a girl that is a visual learning. One of the way that I use to encourage her in our

7 years ago · Like · Comment

OrtizPivaral

"Opposites attract" says the old saying, and for us it has been a total truth and a blessing.

In our home we have a "B complex". We have a scientist (explorer)-4th grade- and an actress (performer)-7th grade- and both are learning to "Balance" each other!

When our inventing scientist perceives her sibling as a "Bore"; the performing actress is perceiving her sister as a "Brain". So, this is a typical example on how we take advantage of the B complex:
-"Mommy, I'm done with my Math for today!", I'm bored! Says the scientist.
-"Oh! you're such a Brainy!", Says the actress. I'm still not done with Literature!
-"Why don't you read the pending Literature chapter your sister?", says mom.

By encouraging this "exchange of talent", I help the scientist (who by the way reads at High School level) with the "boredom" by reading something interesting to the sister and, I enable the "balance" by helping in the frustration of the actress who learns more by listening.

Since we started to encourage this "exchange of talent", they both help each other in school and everyday chores. One doesn't like to clean, while the other is very organized and neat, so one "cleans up" the mess and the other exchanges this act of service by reading something and explaining it back to the sister OR simply making her a sandwich and pouring some milk, its so much fun! Specially when I don't have to be involved in every single argument! They're learning to know their strengths and help the sibling with her challenge.

The opposites are GREAT, they 'Balance" each other! The learning styles assessment has helped us as parents to focus in their strengths in the scope of serving the family and their studies. Thank you for this great learning styles test!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

KEG

My son is a very literal and hands-on type of learner. When we began Algebra this year he had a hard time understanding the concept of a variable. How could "x" be one thing in one equation and something else in another? How could you solve something if you didn't know what it was? How can you combine like variables if you don't know what they are?
So I came up with an interesting approach. I got together some random objects: 4 jacks, 5 rubber balls, 6 bolts, 3 washers. I mixed them all together, and blindfolded him. Then I had him sort them into groups of similar objects by feel.
He didn't know what they were, he just knew they were similar in shape, and was able to group them. As he did this, I explained how they were like variables. He didn't need to know what they were yet, just that each object represented the same thing and belonged in the same group. I could see the lightbulb go on!
He just completed Algebra I- Quadratic Equations and Graphing Parabolas! Now he says single variable equations are "easy"!

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Amazing activity! Wonderful idea....I'll have to remember it when my younger ones reach the algebra age!
7 years ago · Like

Des

We re only in our 3rd year of homeschooling, but I ve done lots of study and research on right brain learners/visual spatial learners. They don t fit very well in the public school system and that is why we pulled ours out to homeschool.

My right brain learner is 10 years old and doing 3rd grade curriculum for the most part. We use the Core Knowledge Foundation books What your ______ Needs To Know as our spine. The following is how I ve adapting my teaching and/or her learning to her learning style.

Reading & Writing -
We hit a brick wall a couple months ago in regards to reading and writing which made me go back and do more research. These are the typical problem areas for the right brain learner/visual spatial learner. My right brain learner wants to learn and enjoys learning everything. She can create wonderful sentences and stories, but she can t write them, so we utilize dictation. She dictates and I write or type. She can t spell. With reading she struggles with tracking and is always mixing up the sight words, but gets a long difficult word right. She still reverses letters when writing and struggles still with the sounds various letters and vowels make. For reading programs we ve done the complete Starfall program, the complete 80 lessons of Headsprout and Time4learning. None of these have really worked for her. So, as I said I went back and did more research. We are now trying the Brain Integration Therapy program by Dianne Craft. So that will be our only reading, grammar, spelling and writing plan for now. It seems to be working quite well. It incorporates exercises that are used in Brain Gym and lots of visuals.

Math
Math is another problem area for right brain learners, at least the addition and subtraction part.
We have been studying money with some very colorfully illustrated worksheets and playing The Allowance Game with real money not play money.
For math we ve done Math-U-See and Time4Learning. She loves the manipulatives of Math-U-See, but the worksheets are boring. No color, just black and white numbers. Time4Learning math is more fun for her and she is doing quite well with it. When we do worksheets I find ones that have lots of color and graphics. She gets more excited about those and wants to do them.

Drawing, music and a creative imagination are real strengths of a right brain learner/visual spatial learner.

History & Geography -
She loves history, it is one of her two favorite subjects.
We do the history and corresponding related material in chronological order.
I read her the books.
We use lots and lots of visual media (a must for right brain learners) such as videos by Schlessinger Media, http://www.neok12.com/, http://www.watchknowlearn.org, YouTube, and the videos on Discovery Education Streaming Plus (my favorite we use daily, I can find video for almost everything).
She listens to audio books.
We do music and art projects relating to the current studies.
No written work.

Science -
She loves science.
I read her the books.
We use lots of visual media as indicated above.
Do lots of hands on experiments.
Regular visits to the Pacific Science Center and the Burke Museum (a natural history museum).
Very little written work.

Literature -
I read her the books. If there is a movie of it, we ll watch it after the book has been read.
Visual media when applicable as indicated above.
She listens to audio books.
Attend live theatre productions regularly.
No written work.

Nature Study -
She loves nature study, it is her other favorite subject.
I read her the books.
We use lots and lots of visual media as indicated above.
Lots of field trips, bird watching and zoo visits.
She is a Bug Club member and attends meetings at the zoo once a month.
We create a lapbook of the current species that is being studied. One a month.
Some written work, which I help with (she tells me what to write).
And lots of drawing.

Music
Weekly piano lesson.
Piano practice 5 days a week for 15 minutes and 5 minutes of creative playing.
Music study/appreciation. Utilize lots of audio and visual media as indicated above.
Attend live concerts.
I read her the books when applicable.
She is teaching herself how to play the recorder with Kids Can Play Recorder with Mel Reeves dvd.

Art
Art materials are always out for her to access, clay, watercolors, oil pastels, markers, colored pencils, etc. She draws independently everyday.
I schedule a Meet the Masters or Art Appreciation session with her at least once a week along with a drawing session with Mark Kistler s Online video lessons once a week.
I read her books when applicable.
Regular visits to the Art Museum
We also utilize visual media when applicable as indicated above.
Also we do a very in depth art project at least once a month. Last month we did relief printmaking.

Crafts
At least once a week she works on spool knitting (often does this while listening to audio books).
Also a cooking lesson once a week.

Spanish
Three times a week a 15-minute session of learning Spanish. We are currently using Salsa, a free program online.

I ve found the following books/resources to be the most helpful:
Discover Your Child s Learning Style
Willis & Hodson
Brain Integration Therapy Manual
Dianne Craft
Teaching the Right Brain Child & video
Dianne Craft
Smart Kids Who Hate to Write! video
Dianne Craft
Right Brain Phonics Program
Dianne Craft
Brain Gym
Paul Dennison

http://www.therightsideofnormal.com/

http://www.brightkidsathome.com/identify/visual-spatial.html

http://www.custom-homeschool-curriculum.com/visual-spatial-homeschool-curriculum.html

http://www.squidoo.com/Right_Brained_Learner

I hope this information may be of help to others.
Thank you.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
sobasoup: thanks for taking the time to write this out, I copied the comments to an email for myself so i can reference it later again easily
7 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: I thank you as well - I also copied down the resources!
7 years ago · Like

jojo98

My 4th grader gives me her math facts and spelling orally while she bounces a ball. The rhythm helps her get it all out and she rarely misses one!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

eeejunesgirl

First of all I observe my kids (as babies/toddlers) to see what they like while we're playing - are they more hands-on, do they listen to directions or follow written/drawn instruction - do they see something on TV and then try to mimic it, once I see how they are when they are little it gives me a head start on when they hit school age. I enjoy sitting back observing them at play when they are young and it gives me a LOT of insight into how they learn best. Of course as they get older I do sometimes need to adjust because as they grow they change, so what works one time doesn't always work. The key is being adaptable and able to change at a moments notice. Thankfully I have enough kids that I tend to have a lot of different methods ready anyways for each lesson and can adjust what I need to at a moments notice. I always keep extra worksheets, lists of videos that are online or on DVD for each lesson, a list of websites that correspond to what they are learning, a lot of different books that approach the subject each a different way and have other "experts" of each subject ready in the event that we need help with something even I don't quite grasp - makes those home school support groups that much more valuable because within the group there are some parents that are better at science, some better at math, some better at language arts/english, etc. We all keep each other on speed dial in the event that one of our kids needs help with something! We also keep lots of what we call "fidget" toys around that they can use if they need to mess with something while learning - like play dough, stress balls, extra pencils, etc. - along with lots of gum & peppermint candies to suck on. I have found that regardless of their learning style that things like gum & peppermints help ALL kids while studying. I think it is key to realize that each child is a different person and that we (as parents/ home school "teachers") need to be adaptable and have a wealth of tools at hand because what works one time may not work the next. Your child may be a visual learner in math, but auditory in english. So being able to adapt to change at a moments notice is very important.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

natalie-straymatter

One of the things I do with my 7yr old daughter is I get her to compose songs with me. She loves music and especially singing. If I want her to remember something all I have to do is put it to music and it really works if she has a part in arranging it. For example, we were learning about vowels and she had a really hard time remembering them so she chose to sing aeiou to the tune of "Bingo". Her song was great and because she thought of it, she remembered it. "....and Vowels was his name-o!". haha. So cute...

7 years ago · Like · Comment
jen p: Both of mine do well with music too!
6 years ago · Like

ChristianHomeschoolMomma

Over the years, through trial and error, I ve learned the importance of teaching my son in his learning style. He is an auditory learner. I am a visual learner. If I teach him in my learning style he ll learn but he won t enjoy learning nearly as much or as deeply as he will in his learning style. Because this is his education I have to step out of my comfort zone and into his. I ve also learned that he is a mover and shaker. Meaning: When concentrating on a task it s important that he be able to stretch, wiggle, or sit on his head if it s the most comfortable way for him to learn at the moment. When we first began homeschooling I thought there was no way he could be focusing on anything related to what I was teaching while stretched across two kitchen chairs with his head resting on the floor. The student became the teacher when I said to him at various times, There is no way you were listening to a word I ve said! Only to hear him recite almost verbatim everything I d just covered. In fact, if my son is sitting quietly, with a scholarly look upon his face, I know that he s actually a knight sitting on his armored steed awaiting his orders from the king. Therefore, he s usually drawing, playing with two action figures (yes, I limit him to two), or stretching Thinking Putty while he s learning. At times I just have to look away and remind myself that just because he s not learning my way doesn t mean it s not the right way.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: One of mine is the same exact way! We actually keep a tub of toys that can be played with while learning (play dough, stress balls, extra pencils & erasers, along with peppermints & gum). And I can't stress how important what you said is - we, as parents/teachers, have to teach to their learning style even if it isn't what works for us and stepping out of our own comfort zone is the only way to accomplish this. And some kids just work best while they appear to be ignoring us and playing with their toys...it is great that you figured this out. That was one of the reasons I began to home school - I got sick of hearing about how one of my kids was constantly having "things" taken away from him while in class because the teacher deemed them a distraction - when the fact is he learned best while playing with those pencils & erasers than he ever did just sitting there listening to her drone on and on. If forced to have nothing in his hands he would get distracted by simply looking at the clock and watching it instead of paying attention to her, he would be thinking about other things that interested him! Try as I might I could NEVER get her to understand it! Good job for not only catching on to it, but also encouraging it!
ChristianHomeschoolMomma likes this. · 7 years ago · Like

Ktripp

Our school is all about teaching my children to love the things we are learning. Since my children are still very you g we learn a lot through play. We play math learning games, reading and spelling games, we learn through cooking, painting, singing, etc. my kids really enjoy hands-on sensory learning. We also read lots and lots of books. We regularly visit the library, but also have a large library of our own. I am building up a collection of manipulatives and great educational games, books and toys that they can use. We go on lots of field trips, and nature walks, too.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I always enjoy taking my kids on field trips - I use to use it only as a reward at the end of a lesson, but have begun to use them to introduce a lesson that we will be working on because it seems to ignite a fire in them making them WANT to learn more about the subject.
Susan K likes this. · 7 years ago · Like

amyswinningways

My 3 youngest students are a good example. My 6 year old son prefers hands on. We do things that require him to touch, feel, see, actually get into what he is learning. Lego's, cars, other manipulatives work well. He also likes his computer. My 5 year old daughter is more digital. She learns really well using the computer so she has her own with her own curriculum but she also has "games" on my phone. My 3 year old is musical and artistic. Videos, music, rhymes, songs, painting, coloring, these all work well for her. For all of them, games together work well. If they are having fun, no matter what it is, they have a tendency to soak in more of the information that I want them to have. 99% of the time, they don't realize its "school work" but I notice them using what they've learned so it's a win win.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I keep lots of toys that are educational in nature around from the time mine were born. So many parents don't grasp that building with those blocks IS educational! Kuddos to you for knowing that AND encouraging it! You seem to have the whole spectrum of learning styles - isn't it funny how kids from the same family can all learn differently...all 6 of my kids learn differently and while it can be challenging it is so rewarding to see when they "get it"!
7 years ago · Like

banannas

Knowing your child's learning style is as simple as listening...well, sometimes that is NOT so simple when you have a house full of 4 teenage boys, 2 little girls and one little boy who is outside more than inside! After years of asking myself and other mothers I evaluate, "What does your child get excited about?" The answer lies in a Biblical principle: "Listen more. Speak less." When your child comes running in excited about something, how does s/he explain it? Using colors, shapes, saying "it looks like..." there's your visual child; using loud, soft, fast, slow, saying "it sounds like..." there's your auditory child; using moving, making, doing, creating, dancing, playing words...there's your kinesthetic child. Of course that is just the beginning. All children are kinesthetic until they are 7 years old and then they lose it - or keep it and share it with auditory or visual tendencies, too. What does your child choose to do when it is free time? Legos, painting, video games - visual (kinestetic); talk to friends, tell stories, play music - auditory; sports, dance, cooking - kinestetic. Now, what to do with it? Just try to develop the other modalities and use the favored one to teach new concepts. And pray. God knows and loves our child even more than we do!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

ajtransue

I am in my 24th year of homeschooling and have experienced a wide variety of learning styles with my six children. One child is a "hands-on" learner and he is my only son so we incorporated lots of reading aloud during which time he could draw or doodle, so he could stay focused on what I was reading. Otherwise his mind would wander. He loved K'nex, so we incorporated them into the study of simple machines. I had a few children who were the "classic" learners and did well and actually enjoyed the workbooks. Most of my children, however, loved the unit studies where we incorporated crafts, lap books, art, cooking and projects. Any way that I could combine different styles, I would do so. One daughter LOVES music and still studies with music playing all the time. I learned that this helped her to focus better; it did not distract her! She learned how to "sing" her multiplication tables and it worked!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

hsjewels

I have a son. I am a female with no brothers. I don't always, (OK, most of the time) "get" my son. But I have learned, in the short time we've been learning together, that he needs to be physical sometimes to focus. When he's getting frustrated, I make him stop and do some jumping jacks, touch his toes, do some somersaults, anything to get his brain switched over and clear out the "muddies", as we call them now. Then he's ready to begin again!

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: We do short lessons with short periods of physical activity all day long. 3 of my boys have varying degrees of ADHD and we found out years ago that if we don't do it this way that they get frustrated and shut down. It's awesome that you've got it down already & have keyed into that. I was always told that boys are so much easier than girls....I disagree! Each child, regardless of gender, presents their own set of unique challenges and I don't know that any of us, as parents always "get it" when it comes to our kids, but through trial & error you'll find what works. Just be prepared to change it up, because I've noticed as they get older that sometimes their learning styles change and we parents have to adapt to them - which is our own special challenge. I sometimes work on lessons while the kids do jumping jacks or stretches...it has been wonderful for spelling & math facts.
7 years ago · Like

JP&E Love

My kids love to play, so we make just about everything into a game. Our favorite is the game of LIFE. It can be adapted to teach just about anything. I have found it especially helpful in teaching the kids how to count money, make transactions with each other, and how to understand things like insurance and stocks. Monopoly is another great game for teaching. I also adapt the games by taping tabs on spots that they land on. For example, we are teaching the the virtues from the products by We Choose Virtues. I place tabs on the games little trail and when the kids land on those tabs, they have to recite or explain what that particular virtue is. If they are successful, then they get a monetary bonus in the game. It's a real motivator for the kids to learn their lessons. I can't overstate just how awesome games can be for teaching!

7 years ago · Like · Comment
jen p: Love!
6 years ago · Like

thezookeeper

I have a very tactile learner. We will toss a ball back and forth while reciting math facts. We play a hopscotch type game with spelling. Even letting him fiddle with something while studying seems to help.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

KendraH

My daughter does okay with the computer or worksheets, etc. She shuts down quicker though when she is stuck inside, so I like taking her to the library, stores, even Walt Disney World often to find things for her to learn. We are in a homeschool group that meets often at the Disney parks to teach through disney. Epcot is still my favorite to teach her about different countries. We love the flower and garden festival she gets hands on learning about plants and history of gardens etc.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I would love to be able to do that! While we are fortunate in that we live in a large city and have lots of places we can do things like that Disney's Epcot would be a WONDERFUL learning tool that would engage ANY child.
7 years ago · Like

Marie Johnson

My boys (6 & 3) love learning thru board games and card games :) and I love that they are having fun and learning simultaneously! :)

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Last year one of my kids was struggling in his math class. I gave him the assignment of designing a board game that focused on what he was learning about - and it was able to actually teach him what he was already learning! But I think the fact that I let him have free reign with it made him think outside the box and make him have to come up with solutions for the answers. He still talks about it and asks when he gets to make his next game! His older brother has done similar things with the computer and making simple PC games. I NEVER discount anything that can be used to reinforce what they are learning.
7 years ago · Like

mamabear

My daughter is always on the move. She has an amazing memory and remembers almost anything said to her. She seems to have a block with addition facts though. It's frustrating to both of us. We have figured out that if she dances while working on her facts, they stick! My oldest, on the other hand, learns and thinks just like me, so it was easy to teach him!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Renateb

As a new homeschooling Mommy I was filled with much self doubt. As I grow more comfortable with my new role I have found that my children learn very differenty. My son likes to do things in a computer format or from the TV. My daughter wants to learn everything directly from me from books or hands on. I love exploring new methods and have collected quite a neat stack of literature and ideas for this upcoming year. I next expenditure is Life of Fred Math. I can't wait to use it! The Amazon gift certificate would get me started with the first few books.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: If you haven't yet - try to find a home school support group in your area - they can be invaluable! Also - there are LOTS of websites that cater to home schooling and have tons of resources that can come in handy for both your kids! Just have lots of fun with it!
7 years ago · Like

Wkm mom

My oldest has Asperger syndrome and is academically gifted but socially and emotionally immature. He has been doing high school level courses, but we actually spend more time learning life skills. Any writing he is required to do is play-based (creating a game or writing a song) because fine motor skills have always been a challenge. Also, he only prefers to read text and getting him to read fiction was impossible, so I read higher level books with him, stoping often to explain idioms, etc.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

sobasoup

for our family we deal with a lot of medical issues for my youngest so we have had to change things yearly based on what is going on with him so my time doesn't always allow for hitting each learning style for all subjects but I try to do it as much as I can. My 13 yr old is more independent and so we have used computer learning and dvd lessons plus this year he uses a science that is completely on his own. No fluff for him, just strong non fiction books and facts. He doesn't care for re-alouds because he can read so much faster and it gets him frustrated to wait so I try to limit those together. More visual then audio. My daughter on the other hand at 11 yrs old wants stories and art so she reads a lot of history through fiction chapter books and for her science I follow up using a lapbook as her review for the chapter instead of a written test. This gives her the chance to cut and paste and color and be more creative. She also gets a lot of drawing books from the library to work on independently. And then as a whole family we spend a lot of time outside observing nature. That hits all learning styles since we can listen, look, and feel at the same time.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

JPalz777

We were very blessed to learn early that my daughter is an auditory learner. When I would give her an assignment to work on in first grade, I would be in the other room and hear her reading out loud. Then I realized (thanks to some very good books written on the topic of learning styles) that she needed to hear things to understand better. So now in fifth grade (and it never fails) if she ever comes to me with a question about her school work, I ask her to read the question or math problem to me. Ninety-nine percent of the time she figures it out while reading to me! If that doesn't work, then I'll read it back to her and she gets it!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

MOM/5+2

We have been homeschooling for 21 years (with 6 more to go). With five children, I have had to LISTEN and LEARN from them on what they needed in order to thrive academically, spiritually, and socially. The greatest lesson I learned throughout the first several years is that homeschooling is not a "one size fits all." Some of my children learn simply by reading the text; others had to have their hands on something at all times while learning or they were distracted. We taught each one according to his or her "bent" as Proverbs teaches us to do. Don't be afraid to pass curriculum along to others or sell it if it isn't working for your child. The investment of yourself to line up with their learning styles is worth far more than any money you feel you may have wasted on curriculum. Believe me...It works!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

lewis1970

Step 1... Pray, pray, pray
Step 2... Know your child's heart & love your child.
Step 3... Pray, pray, pray
Step 4... Work with the interests of your child - building, reading, crafting, etc.
Step 5... Pray, pray, pray
Step 6... Be willing to change your plans if something is not working for your child.
Step 7... Pray, pray, pray
Step 8... Learn with your child - don't assign schoolwork and walk away.
Step 9... Pray, pray, pray
Step 10... Realize that how your child learns is how God made them, and work with that.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Roadschooler

When our boys were 6 and 8 and both very active learners we were presented with a once in a lifetime opportunity to do some traveling. So, instead of reading to them about American history, we rented our house out, got an RV, and toured the country for a year so that they could actually SEE American history. We rode our bikes where Paul Revere rode his horse. We talked to "Pilgrims" on board the Mayflower II. We ground our own corn in Jamestown. We stood where the Boston Massacre took place and listened to our guide tell the story. The boys learned how to tightly pack necessities into a wagon, then drove those horse-pulled covered wagons in a wagon train and got attacked by natives! We followed Lewis and Clark and traced the etched names of pioneers on Register Cliff. As a family we adapted not only our teaching style (we went from structured to almost unschooling for a year), we adapted our whole lives to teach our children about the beauty and amazing history of our country, and it was worth every minute! We have lots of great pictures and memory quilts, made from t-shirts that we bought on our trip, that will last a lifetime. Years later, when we revisit American history, my kids have pictures in their heads of what we're reading about or discussing. I can say, "Do you remember how steep Little Round Top was?" And they do.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: That year of "unschooling" sounds like a blast! I want to do that one day....I can only imagine how much of an impression it made on each of them.
7 years ago · Like

mykidsrock

My first son learns really well from books and worksheets, but he needs me near by to talk to, but not about the work. My second son if very auditory - he really needs to talk things through. If he's going to understand it we have to talk about it. Two very different kids!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Obiebookworm

My granddaughter is both an auditory and visual learner. I believe that her learning style is both inate and learned. From a very young age, around 3 months, her mom and I started her on a balanced program of video/TV, reading time, playtime, and alone time. No , at the age of 2, she naturally gravitates to each ot these times pretty much by herself. She cannot read yet; however, she can identify all of the letters and most of the letter sounds, and numbers up to 10. She communicates well, too, speaking in completete sentences. Because of her balanced lifestyle, she varies in her educational needs - sometimes she wants things shown to her while other times she wants to figure things out for herself.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: I agree that our children's learning styles are both inate & learned. I have basically two "sets" of kids - my older ones I had when I was young and they are my "experiments" at parenting (sounds bad but it really isn't), but I learned that the things I exposed my kids to and things we did have made a HUGE difference in the younger set of kids & how they learn. My 6 yr old daughter taught herself to read by the time she was 4 just because of the experiences that we exposed her to. I have also found that their learning styles can/do change as they grow. But when they are young if you expose them to a variety of learning styles & different experiences they are better able to adapt to anything that is thrown their way.
Obiebookworm likes this. · 7 years ago · Like
Obiebookworm: Agreed!! So true!! :-)
7 years ago · Like
Obiebookworm: I also homeschooled my 3 children for a period of 10 years. They are all in their 20s; and it's interesting to see what they have carried over from their early years, such as TV viewing or the lack thereof. My husband and I chose not to have a TV for the first year of our marriage because we were both couch potatoes, and wanted to experiment with the effects of its removal. We got so many projects done that year that we continued for another 11 before we purchased one!! Our children had the experience of being without and with a TV; and as adults, they prefer to read or find other activities before ever choosing a TV. Actually, come to think of it, none of them own one!
eeejunesgirl likes this. · 7 years ago · Like

CaroleD

My daughter is a kinestetic learner and has difficulty with spelling.When she was younger she enjoyed making the letters with her whole body. I happen to know a little sign language and finger spelling so I taught her the alphabet. Now that she's older she loves practicing her spelling words by fingerspelling them to me! Her spelling has vastly improved and so has her attitude about it!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

mom23

My son does best with auditory learning and pretend play. In fact, when he was 4 years old I once asked him to do something right after watching a video, and he said to me, but Mom, don't you know, after I watch something I have to play it! So we have had dramatizations of the germs fighting the antibodies with pillows in our living room, animals in their different habitats, and of course acted out literature we are reading like Little House on the Prairie books. We also do as plenty of read alouds (although he's getting to be a great reader himself!) For spelling, we found that he learns his words much more quickly if I quiz him for a few minutes while we are in the car running errands than if he writes them on paper.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

minecraftMom

My nine year old girl learns best through stories. She loves history because I read aloud many books, some quite beyond her reading level, and she absorbs it all. Recently I found a story book on logic so we are learning logical fallacies through the stories. When she was younger she learned a good deal of science from the Magic School bus series. A series like that for older children would be great. She loves the Basher science books because they turn science concepts into cartoon characters, but they are light on explanations. We recently found the Life of Fred math series which teaches math through stories and will read those soon. She also learns through computer games, especially Minecraft. We play together and take on many historical architecture projects. Since we studied ancient history this year we built a step pyramid, ziggeraut, hanging gardens, greek temple, and light house. She also reads the Minecraft wiki and keeps up to date on all the new building materials and recipes. So I guess my child learns through stories and by doing. Perhaps that makes her a typical girl. :)

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Organicmommaof4

It is quite a challenge to homeschool my 4 kids and still meet each one's unique learning style. I have a precociously intelligent 10 yr old, an 8 year old who is smart but has to overcome multiple learning and neurological disabilities, a 5 year old who is very much an art lover and them my sweet toddler who insists on being included in school!
I have discovered lap books are AH-MAZING! I can take a theme and very easily adapt it to each unique child! I can include more in depth reading and study for #1, more "together work" for #2, more artsy stuff for #3 and fun things like themed stickers and color pages for #4! They are all learning, they are all having fun (so important) and no one is neglected!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

BlueSky39

My almost thirteen years old son has ADHD and finds being still or quiet for more than a few minutes difficult. He is a visual/auditory learner. So, we read aloud usually and watch lots of documentaries. We pay a $50.00 membership fee to a neighboring county's library system. With thirty-nine branches it is well worth the money. We have watched dozens of videos covering everything from basic algebra, the American Revolution (and many other American wars), to grammar and biology. We are continuing school through the summer and will do only math and a video of some type every day. Between the library and Netflix< I have more than enough to get through the summer.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

grfric

My daughter has Asperger's and is a very visual and kinesthetic learner. So she reads a lot and we do lots of hands-on activities together. I try to minimize the verbal information as much as possible b/c I know she tunes it out. If I need to "tell" her something, I write it down as well.... on a whiteboard or notebook so she can see it as I'm saying it.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

cdrumm4448

I read aloud for a large portion of the day. My son is very aural and not only does he learn better this way, we all enjoy it!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Tglock

I have two very active young children, and my daughter is definitely a right-brained kinesthetic learner. Rather than make them sit still to do drill work, I let them choose the motion. My daughter loves to do her flashcards over and over again hopping like a frog, doing jumping jacks, standing on one foot, etc. Also, for her independent drill, I have her "perform" it for her baby brother. It has made a big difference in her attitude toward her work.
Also, to get my visual learner in the mix, I have them both work together with our felt letters. My oldest (the visual) will spell a word on the felt board; then my daughter (kinesthetic) who is just learning to read will sound out the word. They have such a good time together learning! And it gives me a free minute to feed the baby. =)

7 years ago · Like · Comment

jorae

I realized over the course of this year that anytime my daughter could do a creative art project in a day her whole attitude and demeanor brightened up. I've made it my goal to incorporate something artistic each day. One day it may be illustrating her cursive practice. Another she illustrates the history reading. Our science curriculum had the kids make Period-ic Playdough and form an atom for one element of the periodic table. That was a hit! Yesterday she drew a beautiful rendition of Psalm 18:1, 2. For writing she may write and illustrate a paragraph. I often make these projects up on the fly. Especially if she is struggling, I will try to think of a way to either incorporate her coloring or illustrating what she is doing or just take a break and "create" for a little while.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

momof2girls

We recently completed the "A Self-Portrait" Online Learning Style Profile. Thanks Homeschool Buyers Co-op for making such a great resource available. I discovered that my 8 year old child has a relational disposition and learns best when acting out the lesson. So, to reinforce alphabetical order skills I took her to my non-profit workplace as a volunteer and taught her to file our client files. Also, as a reward, she was allowed to work with the volunteer cashier and bag items in our thrift store - she loved this. Not only is she getting retail experience, but with her relational disposition, she is learning about customer service.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Twiz

I painted the side of my fridge into a blackboard and as my saughter is a visual learner and my son an audiitory learned. I write and explain as we go. I have been surprized at how much his spelling and reading has improved with this approach.

My next son likes doing, and variety , so I sometimes let him do i t on the board or sidewalk. He also does bettr under pressure so if he doesn't have someone to race with, i ask him how long he thinks it should take him to do one part and subtract a couple of minutes and set the timer

My 2nd daughter does not do well under pressure and altho academics are not always easy for her she has a determination that stands her in good stead.

I so enjoy their differances.....

7 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: It's great to hear that the blackboard paint actually works! I am setting up a school room in my house and wanted one wall to be strictly for a white board (I found that the "walls" for showers work well for this), and I wanted to do one wall with the blackboard paint but wasn't sure how well it would actually work. Now that I know it works I am definitely going to go for it! Thanks!!!
7 years ago · Like

Write something...
My children both love arts, crafts, and telling stories. Thus, for many of our writing projects I have had them write and illustrate a story. For geography we have had fun making paper mache globes: first for the continents, then for countries.
My children are both full of energy so we occasionally sit at a table to work, but often we move from room to room to work sometimes sitting on the floor, sometimes standing next to a counter, and sometimes sitting on our couch. Also because they have so much energy, I put it to use while we learn. For example to learn new spelling words I have them do a jumping jack (or other exercise) for each letter while spelling the words. Both of my children are avid readers as well, so I search bookstores, the library and the internet for novels and children's books that present the topics we're learning about. There are plenty of books about historical concepts, but I've found many books on science, math, music, language skills and art concepts that we have enjoyed as well.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

lisa

Write somethWrite something...
Our daughter processes at a third grade level and up, across the board, but is only 6 in body and social skills. A learning style assessment and other assessments have demonstrated that she is a strong spatial and auditory learner; has an auditory and visual memory; and is very kinesthetic.

Our greatest challenges have been any and all math work book pages, cards and such. She knows the answers, learns at first introduction of a concept but she sometimes cries, and nearly always checks out or "watches a movie channel, listens to a book, and think about my whole entire life" all at the same time, per her report. This happens almost immediately when a work book page is presented. Big or small. Avoidance.

Solutions:
-With the encouragement of our coach we have moved to mostly verbal work book pages instead of written. We have slowly been able to progress to her feeling comfortable independently writing the answers to 1/4 of the pages. This is all she really needs in order to practice the concepts.

-We introduce multiple math concepts in a lesson day, all of which are hands on demonstrations, which she enjoys the most.

-We no longer plan daily math lessons and instead group them into twice to three times a week hands on sessions.

-I have also added art lessons on a math day, art seems to "get the wiggles out" and stimulates her in a positive way.

L

8 years ago · Like · Comment

I have four children with four different learning styles.

My oldest would have probably been happy doing a school-at-home curriculum package with workbooks and schedules. She's very independent and self-directed. I've managed to incorporate some workbooks for her over the years and she's been fairly happy with that. Right now she's doing high school work and our curriculum is designed to be self-directed with once a week parent conferences. It works well for us.

My next child is a mover. She was NOT ready for sit-down school until she was 7 years old and even then, she'd randomly fall out of her chair during reading lessons. I was frequently talking to her bottom because she had this strong need to be upside-down. I just moved school to the couch and let her stand on her head on the couch as long as she promised not to fall over on me. She didn't always keep her promise but it helped her listen and I was so glad when she outgrew the upside-down stage. She wouldn't have survived public school. I'm so thankful I got to homeschool her. :) We use My Father's World curriculum which uses lots of literature and has plenty of hands-on activities. She very much enjoys the crafts even now at age 13. She also still needs to be moving so I read the literature to her while she either knits, draws or assembles a craft. It's been a good balance.

My son has language delays and doesn't always understand verbal instruction. So far that's not been a huge problem because he's still at the picture book age. Again, I'm thankful our usual curriculum is fairly hands-on. He really enjoys cutting and pasting, making his own little books and filling in worksheets. I've started to use lapbooks to reinforce the lessons since he doesn't always get the information the first time around. So far that's working very well. I also try to turn anything I'm reading to him towards him so he can read along with me. That helps quite a bit with his comprehension. Giving him extra time to let my words soak in and be processed is another tool I've picked up.

My youngest is a chatterbox! She loves talking and being talked and read to. So far her curriculum is just reading good books. She looooooves Beatrix Potter books and has memorized the Tale of Benjamin Bunny. She asks me to read it to her at least once a day. Looking ahead I think my best strategy with her will be to let her read aloud to me so she uses that strong need to verbalize everything. That should fit in well with our curriculum since there's a lot of reading to do.

Homeschooling has been such and adventure and I'm so thankful I get to be home with my children and know their needs. :)

8 years ago · Like · Comment

As we have been homeschooling I've learned that my daughter is auditory...She loves for me to read outloud to her, and she loves to talk! So, I revamped my approach to history and literature after reading about a curriculum called sonlight that incorporates history through literature. This sounded perfect for my girl! Although we haven't purchased that curriculum yet, I have started checking out library books that enhance what she's learning in school (even fiction books that are based in certain time periods, in certain states or countries, etc). She also talk, talk, talks! So, she makes up sentences for her spelling words, and comes up with her own stories to tell. Now, she is also very artsy...she writes the stories down, draws pictures (for her little brother to practice reading) & draws pictures for eeeeeeeeeeverything she writes! Spelling words = pictures! So we make lapbooks for many subjects. My son is the opposite...he is happy to watch dvd clips of teaching segments or have me show him what he needs to do. oddly enough, my daughter enjoys these dvd segments that I find at the library or online. So, we use a wide range if styles in order to cover both kids. :) We've been fortunate to travel a little bit, which makes a world a difference! After going to Yorktown, VA we have all ben more interested in history/geography!Write something...

8 years ago · Like · Comment

As we have been homeschooling I've learned that my daughter is auditory...She loves for me to read outloud to her, and she loves to talk! So, I revamped my approach to history and literature after reading about a curriculum called sonlight that incorporates history through literature. This sounded perfect for my girl! Although we haven't purchased that curriculum yet, I have started checking out library books that enhance what she's learning in school (even fiction books that are based in certain time periods, in certain states or countries, etc). She also talk, talk, talks! So, she makes up sentences for her spelling words, and comes up with her own stories to tell. Now, she is also very artsy...she writes the stories down, draws pictures (for her little brother to practice reading) & draws pictures for eeeeeeeeeeverything she writes! Spelling words = pictures! So we make lapbooks for many subjects. My son is the opposite...he is happy to watch dvd clips of teaching segments or have me show him what he needs to do. oddly enough, my daughter enjoys these dvd segments that I find at the library or online. So, we use a wide range if styles in order to cover both kids. :) We've been fortunate to travel a little bit, which makes a world a difference! After going to Yorktown, VA we have all ben more interested in history/geography!Write something...

8 years ago · Like · Comment

Trixi&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;#039;s HomeEd Academy

My 8-year old is a very active & kinaestetic learner. We removed him from private school in August last year because his learning style & gross/fine motor skills weren't properly addressed. He was a struggling reader & subsequently resents reading, workbooks & worksheets. I let him do online Math & English games. I have also invested in Switched on Schoolhouse PC based Language Arts and Teaching Textbooks for Maths. Now school is a breeze even for me as they are both autograded. We use our Wii Fit for physical activities and also do Brain Gym daily. For History & Geography we currently utilize National Geographic & NatGeo Wild. He loves cutting up his worksheets for lapbooks & hasn't realized yet that he's still doing them even though they're just in a different format. We utilize educational PC & internet games to a large extent. Also online educational videos. We start our school day with "How Stuff's Made", "How They Do It" & "Mythbusters" on DSTV. I post regular progress updates on my blog at http://homeschoolblogger.com/trixishomeschoolacademy/

8 years ago · Like · Comment

Tami6410

I am not sure which learning style my son falls into yet. He seems to touch on 3 of them in particular right now. We just finished K and I am still learning along with him. I try my best to see the world through his eyes and make everything a learning lesson. We do a lot of math lessons throuout a day. The other day t was raining and he wondered out loud why the rain made different patterns on the window when we drove faster. This turned into a physics lesson for him. We discussed it as we drove home and once we got home we followed up with some research on the computer. I am learning his signals of being done with a lesson though, and we stoped when he was ready with a review and then moved on to building with lego. At the moment I would say he is a Paul/Ian/Ron and I evaluate which one we need to pay attention to at the time and adapt his lessons accordingly. It takes some work on my part, but I am getting better and better each day at it. He also LOVES reading, so, I have signed up as a Usborne consultant to hopefully save a little on the cost of books in our home, plus to offer other homeschooling mom's the same oportunity. I hope it is ok to post it, here is my web site
www.myubam.com/M3393

8 years ago · Like · Comment

kiddogmom

My 7 yr ofd son is a visual learner, so whenever he gets stuck on something, especially if it's a new concept, I do my best to draw a picture of it, or show him some sort of diagram. We have used this in logical thinking, Language arts, math, and of course history with its maps and photos are always wonderful. Very quickly he has been able to make his own diagrams or drawings to figure things out, then pretty soon he doesn't need them any more. We also watch videos and documentaries to reinforce or even introduce some concepts. I've been very pleased with his ability to recall some things months later.
When it's time to find correct answers to a test , especially in history, I'll have him read his histroy text to find it. If it's true or false, he has to write down the page he found it on. This way he doesn't just "know" it's the opposite answer, he's actually researched it.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

My approach to teaching is to incorporate as many modalities as possible. When we are reading a piece of literature, I often get the book on tape or CD so they can read along with it. The also annotate as they read or at the end of a chapter. For instance, when discussing the novel The Scarlet Letter, I use discussion to involve all learners rather than a lecture, which allows learners to zone out. Furthermore, I write on a white-board to allow them to see what we are talking about. Since I require them to write down their thoughts before they come to our discussion they are prepared and engaged. Lastly, they write down the notes from the board. This also gives a lesson and prepares them for notetaking in college.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

onlysmallthings

My six-year-old son is a VSL, which is one of the main reasons unschooling suits us so well. So many of the prepared curricula cater to one type of learning style and it is difficult to adjust to my son's needs. We listen to a lot of audio books (everything from the Little House on the Prairie series to Jim Weiss' reading of The Story of the World (my son is a history buff). My husband and I both read aloud (many times a day) and we watch many types of documentaries. I also created a website for my VSL so he has the opportunity to view his interests safely while online. Basically, it is a blog that includes links to all of his interests (via their online homes). For example, he enjoys NOVA specials and there is a NOVA link. But, he also likes Dual Survivor, so there is a DS link. For fun, there are links to Dinosaur Train and the Playmobil site. His link to Reading Kingdom is also there. He loves having his own website and it caters to his VSL needs.

8 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: A website is a GREAT idea! I have one child that has been learning PC programming and has wanted to set up his own website. I had put the brakes on it though, because he tends to focus only on it and nothing else. But now after reading this I think maybe I should go ahead and let him and maybe use it as a basis for ALL of his educational resources! Thank you for "helping" me make the decision to go ahead with this task....I was so concerned that he would focus on making it all about video games or something else non-school related. But now I see that I can take his love of creating a website and incorporate it to fulfill more than just his likes....and enhance it so it encompasses so much more. I really appreciate you posting this!
7 years ago · Like

indiamom

I have a special needs daughter and a gifted daughter. I have had to really learn how my children learn. My special needs child learns from music and videos and hands on and
of course repetition. She can remember many things, if we put it to music. My gifted child is very high in reading, so we use more literature based curriculum to her advantage. We also use history songs for American history and geography. They have historical facts and dates put to music. I can even play them in the car. I find when I go back and ask her a date or question, she'll pause and I can see her singing in her head until she reaches the answer. They both have learned from computer educational games like timez attack. They love playing video games and don't even know that they are learning and getting more proficient in a particular area. I try and give my children many opportunities to learn in different ways. Things will stick with them better if they love doing them!

8 years ago · Like · Comment

I have a visual-print learner daughter and a visual-spatial learner son at my house. What that looks like in real terms is a daughter enamoured of books and workbooks who does a lot of self teaching and learning through reading. My son on the other hand is easily distracted and loves nothing more than to spend the day drawing. He is a visual guy who loves videos, being read to, and creating things. To cater to my daughter, I buy workbooks from BJU, Evan Moor and Miquon and send a lot of time checking out books at our local library. For my son, I cater some of his learning to his interests, (i.e. superheroes) as this engages him to focus on his work. I work on reading with him in our "reading corner." After my son reads his reading lesson to me, I reward him by reading a hero book to him. Also, in between doing workbook pages, I allow him to draw a hero or whatever he would like for a bit. These little rewards have really kept him motivated. I also buy him superhero beginning readers to practice his reading. As long as I keep things engaging and creative, they both seem to focus better.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

My youngest is so right brained, everything has to be hands on, especially math and reading. To teach him to read, I start with Boggle Jr., having him sound out the letters needed to make the word. Then I use Upwords to build each word and other words with the same ending. I have to do this to show him the ending doesn't change when the first consonant is changed. Finally, I put the words on index cards, color coded with parts of speech for later reference, and we review what he has already learned. I use the cards to make sentences. Finally, I find books that use the words we have learned. The process is slow and time consuming, but he seems to retain what he has learned best when he has built the words with his hands.
For math, I use RightStart Math because of all the manipulatives. I could have gathered the manipulatives together for each lesson from a conventional math program, but I would rather use a program that is made for his learning style and spend my time in other areas.
Of course, I let him have plenty of free time to be constructive with boxes, paper, toys, etc.

My oldest is a whole brained, visual learner who is very good in math. My biggest struggle with him is having him pay attention when I read aloud. If he has something in his hands, he concentrates on that and not what I am reading. I need to have him read it first to himself, and then listen while I read it to both boys so we can discuss it. He needs curriculum with short lessons such as Answers In Genesis science series. He also needs lots of time to complete what he is working on since he is meticulous and detailed oriented.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

Our house is full of BUSY BOYS and BUSY MINDS and I have finally come up with a way to teach multiple ages at the same time. They all enjoy and retain the information AND I retain my sanity. :) We use videos, plus discussion - the computer, plus discussion and book work, plus discussion. Discussion time reinforces our educational time, helps them articulate and teaches good listening skills. When we watch videos, each child takes notes based on his level of skill and at the end, they each stand up and present their 'report'. Children love to interact, and love to share their ideas. Building knowledge, self-esteem, character and communication skills and making learning fun - that's what school is all about!

8 years ago · Like · Comment

CherylHenderson

I have two kinesthetic children who have auditory processing challenges and one balanced. For basic arithmetic I took a dry erase marker and made a number line across the floor. And then we played a modified game of hopscotch. (Stand on 2 and take 8 steps. Where will if you land?)

We also do a lot with audiobooks since their auditory attention span was so limited in the beginning. Now we do them primarily for fun. The auditory/kinesthetic children are also very visual so I make sure that we have lots of video teaching tools as well as loads of paper for drawing and doodling. They seem to catch on faster that way.

One thing I've learned for my APC children is that having watching shows that have closed-captioned helped them learn to read. The combination of visual text and the words helped them overcome their challenges with sounding out things, which is difficult when you're having problems differentiating the short "a" sound from a short "o" sound.

My balanced child gets sucked into all of these activities. She's a hands-on learner in that she's like Dee Dee from "Dexter's Laboratory" with that "what does this button do?" experimental tendencies.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

booksb4bread

Two of my children are solidly kinesthetic and the other two are evenly balanced. I use a number of techniques to accommodate kinesthetic learning. We keep exclusive fidget toys--slinky, large paperclips for stringing, small wooden puzzles and mazes, playdough, magnets--for use when they need to be still and listen quietly. For memorization of facts I've had them march or do jumping jacks while reciting the facts. For vocabulary, they will sometimes make up songs with hand and arm gestures. I include all four children in these activities, just to enrich their learning with a variety of learning styles.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

karennc

My daughter is quite visual and loves to draw, so I have used several avenues to supplement studies. In addition to documentaries and electronic or local field trips, we've done old movies (especially musicals) to give a feel for historical times (and to discuss the level of accuracy and influences on the way Hollywood portrays history). Literature and history summaries can show up as storyboards or drawings. I've included manga/graphic novel versions of material on science, history, biography and literature when I could find such. Online games help with math. Later in middle school I plan to do a "movies as literature" course with her.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

My 2nd son definitively do not learnthe same way has my firstborn. I've discovered this the hard way last year. Ugh. Firstborn is more visual like me while I have discovered that my 2nd born is more auditive like his dad. He had trouble learning his scriptures last year until I decided to put the CD first before we proceed to learn the scriptures. He is learning so much more with the songs it is unbelievable. This year, he finished his book ahead of everyone. I also found that for learning more difficult concept - even with the auditory aspect - my 2nd son need sometimes to have something in his hands to play with.

Knowing this makes it easier for me. Especially since he is struggling more to learn than his older brother who has more facility to learn. I have two otehr kids ages 5 and 3. I know that their learning style will be different too... I just have to remind myself of this.
My 3rd son is a mover. And I know that I need to stop every once in a while and let him move around the house.

My daughter is still young. I have to yet discover how she prefers to learn. But when her big brothers are at the table doing school, she is there too doing her preschool things. She is adorable!

8 years ago · Like · Comment

I've learned that my kids seemed to do better with subjects like History if they could see it happening. So we've adapted to that by using videos of historical events. For instance, we are working through early American history. To help them grasp how things transpired, we've used America - The History of Us, Liberty's Kids, and any other videos (the History Channel DVDs have been fantastic) that present the facts in an entertaining way. They've gone from forgetting all the "boring facts" they've read in the books, to being able to recite specific events in spectacular detail due to the visuals they've seen. It's like they can replay those parts in their mind to remember how it happened and who was involved. After watching the videos we discuss what we've learned and do a project related to that event. My kids went from hating history, to loving it.

8 years ago · Like · Comment

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