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Homeschool Curriculum
for Science & Technology

On this page you will find the BEST DEALS ON THE PLANET for award-winning homeschool science and technology curriculum that can make science a favorite subject for your homeschooled students. (Get more Co-op savings)

Tips ▼

~~ Homeschool Teaching Tips ~~


SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

For many, science and technology are among the hardest subjects to teach, but also very rewarding.

Share your favorite science and technology teaching tips with our community, and get a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Certificate! Our winner will be randomly drawn from posts that are entered during STEM Month.

We will do the drawing at the beginning of each month for posts in the prior month, and announce the winner in the Co-op newsletter. Your posts will remain on this page to provide ideas and inspiration to other homeschool teachers! (Need help?)


AmyJ

DIVE Science! When my kids got older, middle and high school math and science was starting to get completely beyond anything I could manage. I had to start seeking out classes and tutors. DIVE Science was fantastic because it allowed my kid to work online and at home and also had the ability to email questions and view ALL labs as well as do some at home. Dr. Shormann also does DIVE math for Saxon and his own math curriculum. Very affordable and also offers AP prep courses!

10 months ago · Like · Comment

sc125

Taking the time to create a science fair style project! Whether or not you participate in a fair with other students, the executive functioning, scientific method, and presentation skills can be invaluable and fun for homeschool students!

10 months ago · Like · Comment

KC

Science fairs! Another homeschool mom put together a science fair and it has brought science alive in our house! My kids love the idea of competing as well as the opportunity to share their work. The discussions with their friends have turned form Batman to what experiment they will be doing. It has made them desire to present quality work since others will be seeing it, too. A few small prizes will be available that the families have pitched in together for. Overall, it's been an amazing process. I would recommend putting together a science fair for families who need a boost to their science studies!

10 months ago · Like · Comment

Prazin' Him

Connecting these subject areas with God's Holy Scriptures Bible is always relevant, exciting, and inspiring. Following several weeks of indebth readings, trips, projects and media resources of a given STEM related topic, then reading, studying, pondering,and learning about this from the Bible. Such as architecture in the construction of the tabernacle, Noah's arch prove invaluable, informative, interesting, and fascinating over and over again. Exploring with lots of reading, research, visits the nature of animals and the power of God to subdue and change the natural characteristics of animals i.e. Raven who feed Elijah, lions who did NOT touch Daniel.
Studying the significance of the astronomy in the plan of GOD...how He uses the heavens to declare glory (star of Bethlehem, extended daylight so Joshua could finish the battle in victory, and leading children of Israel with pillar of fire by night to name a few).

10 months ago · Like · Comment

Kittypearl

My son has ADHD so I have to make sure I keep his interest engaged. I will ask him a question to spark his interest. For example, how are stars made? Or, why does the moon look so different sometimes? Then, I will look for the answer either at the library or in our curriculum and study that subject for a week. If possible, we do an experiment and crafts related to the subject. At the end of the lesson I will ask how this information is useful in our life and start a brief discussion.

10 months ago · Like · Comment

faithful8

I tie science lessons to nature as much as possible. Children seem to have an instinctive love for animals and plants. They are very curious about the world that surrounds them in creation. I think we have to turn that curiosity into teachable moments and make it fun! I have bird feeders outside the window and window clings that help them identify the birds they see. I put many books on birds close by that will expand their learning. Every year I let them plant something in the garden to enhance our nature studies. We study weather changes, changes in the seasons, animal behaviors, etc. These are things they already want to know so there is no problem motivating them!

10 months ago · Like · Comment

Spricetyty

I set up a maker space in our house with a large array of recycled materials, different types of tape, batteries, alligator clips, metal tape and scraps of metal, cardboard, wood, scissors, rulers, office supplie, etc. Having free access to this space in addition to the construction toys we have on hand (Lego, k'nex, hydrodynamic deluxe water set, chaos tower, keva planks, snap circuits, arduino, etc) has generated so much exploration, innovation and discovery. It has created an atmosphere for creating which seems to grow and build as the days go on. We also subscribed to RumbleLab which has been FANTASTIC. They send out monthly project crates for hands on learning and supported with video tutorials and explanation of the science behind the projecst. But what sets it apart from other crate subscriptions is their monthly innovation contest (with great prizes) where your child takes a real problem from their own life and develops a creative solution to that problem. It has been so fun and motivating to be a part of the RumbleLab team. I highly recommend for anyone who wants to encourage more STEAM innovation in their class or homeschool.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Novelgirl

Looking for an engaging chemistry course for your middle schooler? We've been using lessons on the ACS Chemistry for Life website. Well laid out, great visuals, and fun experiments! I highly recommend it. http://www.middleschoolchemistry.com/lessonplans/

2 years ago · Like · Comment

cello4ever

I saw on Pinterest that some teachers had set up their own Makerspace area in their classrooms. They filled smaller bins, organized and labeled with a variety of STEM or STEAM supplies. They had printed and laminated challenge cards(varying in difficulty) and added those to their area. I found a list of common supplies used for these and bought most from the Dollar Store. I bought a set of bins from Michael's when it was 50% off and organized away. I am in the process of tracking down STEM and LEGO challenge cards and will set it all up on a small $15 bookcase from Walmart. When I saw the Ultimate Science DVD specials here, I decided to buy some and add them, our legos, and a K'nex set we already owned to the Makerspace area. The kids are excited and can't wait to dig in. This will be especially helpful in keeping my kinesthetic engineer-minded son busy while I work with my older children. He just participated in a Makerspace 'class' at our local library and absolutely loved it. Having a challenge card or specific project helped him to stay more focused than I have ever seen him. Very excited to finish the project this weekend!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Eclectic

I avoid rote learning, preferring an understanding of patterns & relationships, or tricks that are quick & easy. When we can't find any I search books & online for a mnemonic that my chid will like & doesn't have to try to remember.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Ohiomommy

We use Bob Jones Science as our curriculum, but follow-up with many hands-on and field trips that explain the unit we are doing. We they were younger, we just did experiments and hands-on. We also did themes when they were younger that would center around history or science, so puzzles, math and reading would evolve around the theme.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Florida mom

In our 3rd year of homeschooling, we have learned to make math more tolerable by breaking it up in stages. I teach a concept and assign a few problems. Then, the next day we tackle a few more problems. By doing this, there is less tears. I also vary the days up with math games or look for fun math worksheets from the internet to reenforce the concept. For science, we sign up for local science classes at the various museums we have in our town. At these museums they are exposed to real labs, which they have a wonderful time. As far as technology goes, I have them practice typing their spelling words and their stories on word documents. They also have websites they are allowed to explore. I think the key is to add variety and switch things up when needed!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

RNSmith

I'm in my 15th and final year of homeschooling. I have 2 math tips. The tip that was given to me long ago was to have your child test out of the beginning lessons in their math book. How? Give them the the first test and if they make an A, move on to the second test, and so on. Both of my children are strong math students and usually tested out of the first 10-15 lessons (this gave us a cushion of 2-3 weeks in the lesson plans). The second tip I discovered along the way. We used Saxon math from 3rd grade to high school. I would give my students the placement tests as a pretest, midterm and a final. By doing this, I was able to: 1) address any concepts they had forgotten; 2) ensure they didn't have any gaps; and 3) find out where we needed to start the next school year.

2 years ago · Like · Comment
RNSmith: Thought I was on the Ideas for Math screen! But when I signed, looks like I was rerouted. My apologies for posting on the wrong page :(
2 years ago · Like

MichelleH

I loosely followed the Grossology books and we did a Grossology unit. All hands on. Super fun. We loved it. I taught it at our local homeschool co-op, too. Everyone loved it.
I am willing to share it for free if anyone is interest. It can be used for students from 1st through 6th grade or so. I love hands on science. My kitchen table is usually filled with experiements of one kind or another.

3 years ago · Like · Comment
Katie K: If you are willing to share - I would love the info! katie_knickrehm@yahoo.com
2 years ago · Like
MichelleH: Wow. I forgot I posted this. As much as I would love to share it , my hard drive crashed and I lost everything on my computer. I do have everything copied and in a binder but not sure how I could get that to you.
2 years ago · Like
Prazin' Him: Thanks for being willing to share! Send to penywhite@hotmail.com
10 months ago · Like

Mongolianmama

We make use of net flix videos that show math application in real life, and enjoy marrying math/science with our sewing and building projects!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

mountainmama

STEM is one of my favorite parts of school. It is an area of interest for our whole family, so it is fun to really dig into it. My boys are still young, so I really enjoy them having time to just explore. One of my favorite parts of homeschooling is the freedom to allow them to really dig deep as they explore and experience concepts and enjoy the beauty and order of math and science and that realm. My boys are very much enjoying trying out some basic coding foundations with things like Kodable. One of my favorite groups and sources of inspiration for math is Natural Math (naturalmath.com)! I love seeing their minds wrapping around deep mathematical concepts with delight and encountering and discovering new ones as they reflect and consider what they are encountering! My older son, who is still only 7, also really loves engineering types of things, and I'm excited to have started a tinkering box for him this year. Legos are also a favorite and not just something I can manipulate to use for specific formal learning activities but are such a great STEM experience in themselves (and a total favorite in our home!). My younger son has a marble track set that he literally rebuilds and recreates daily with total enjoyment and has been a huge favorite of any kid who joins us for some play/learning/exploration time. I know that it can be a challenging area for some, but I do think a big part of our kids embracing it as a fun and exciting area of learning is that both my husband and I are really genuinely excited about it as well and love to continue to learn and explore new things in this arena ourselves.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Jen120983

My daughter is in preschool, so we are focusing on "learning as we live" in those areas, which occasional little kitchen science experiments. She loves the Clifford science kits

3 years ago · Like · Comment

EggMom

My son loved the Youth Digital Minecraft Mod class. It was a great way to combine his love of Minecraft with learning beginning programming skills.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

schneiderscrew

Being dually blessed with having our own business and able to homeschool, we have the opportunity to incorporate the two. We do construction for a living. It's easy to show the kids the value of knowing and applying math, science and engineering skills. They get to practice by using tape measures, adding fractions, figuring angles, etc. There's plenty of family owned businesses that, like us, would be happy to spend time with kids to show them what they can do with their basic knowledge.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

susykins

We get a lot of library books on topics like animals, and robots and anything that interests my 5 year old at the moment. One of his favorite this past week was Charlie and Kiwi, which shows how animals evolve in a fun way (there is time traveling involved, so another topic to talk about there!).

We have puzzles, and games like Pattern Play at hand. We do a free lego hour at the library. We build mazes and domino-effect courses and houses for toys using things around the house, like popsicle sticks and large legos and boxes.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Jbutter3

My tip is to let your child discover facts themselves. Give them a real world experience to learn information.

Example: I have a preschooler and we've been learning about different animals. My mother volunteers at a zoo so we arranged for my son to feed the giraffes. He also got to see what other foods they eat and how they clean up the their exhibit. My son was amazed that such a big animal has such little poop pellets.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

themusicmom

Rather than have a STEM science curriculum, I have free time for the kids to explore with basic materials. Little kids have a weekly rotation of puzzles, blocks, pattern blocks... Duplos and Legos are a staple around here. "Lego building challenge" is a favorite "I'm bored" activity. Elenco SnapCircuits set has been one of the best purchases I've made for as the kids have gotten older.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

mostlymommy

My kids are still quite young, so a lot of the super-exciting STEM materials are beyond us yet. At the moment, I'm simply ensuring that I choose options for math and science that are not merely reading and rote memorization but include problem-solving, hands-on exploration, and critical thinking. We also encourage the kids to explore the capabilities of our computer and tablet on their own and have been amazed at how much they have figured out. In order to augment their understanding, we've introduced the idea of coding through games like LightBot.

I'm excited for all the future possibilities I've been reading about here!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Day2

STEM is all about solving problems whose solutions aren't immediately obvious. So every week, I prepose a problem to my children that I haven't seen the solution for or worked out yet. We work on the problem together as a team, encouraging everyone to give ideas and enforcing the concept that we must have lots of failed attempts to solve something before we can narrow down the right solution. My goal is to try to take away the fear of failure in the children.

I take our challenges from a couple different sources including books from the Critical Thinking Company, real life problems I come across, and a book I am recently falling in love with called Plying With Math from NaturalMath.com.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Allboys2

One of my boys' favorite things to do is create and build their own robots and inventions from a Builder Box I made. It's just a big plastic tub that I put old broken electronic toys, finger lights, Popsicle sticks, etc that they can create and build however they like. To start the box I ordered little motors, alligator clips and battery holders from Amazon for about $3 for a pack of 6. They quickly learned how circuits, switches, fans and motors work by connecting wires and reversing them to change directions. They have spend hours creating and are now working on incorporating a small solar panel to power their creations(Dollarstore solar light). My boys love going to the dollar store to find parts. A little handheld fan will have one motor, one fan blade and a battery compartment that they can disassemble and use for their next build.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

shj

We do hand-on projects. When my son wanted a computer, we found him a free one that needed repair and he found out a way to repair it himself. He has also learned to write code on his own and is earning a little money designing games.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

hiddenhillshomeschool

We do "engineering math" on Fridays. I prepare for a hands-on building or engineering type of project and my daughters spend a few hours working on it....and many more hours playing with their new creations. For example, we've made mouse trap catapults, a ride-through sprinkler bike washer, a mechanical wind vane, whistles and instruments out of tin and aluminum cans, drop spindles out of CDs, and many more. I've found that projects are the best way to use and build enthusiasm for math and science.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

TMiyashi

As a home school mom who is almost done, I will piggy back on some of the existing posts. I too did the FIRST robotic league and totally agree that while it was super challenging and a lot of work, it was also a lot of fun and one of those experiences that I look back on and am so glad we did it. The kids learned way more than I ever anticipated, still talk about it, still remain in contact with each other. We went to the state championships every year and did well for three years.

I'll also piggy back on the "hands off" post in that later in the teen years, we handed our son a GoPro (early in it's history) and told him to figure it out. He did, and we told him to make a movie (again, he had to figure out the software on his own). End result, he ended up winning state and national film awards, has been invited to enter international competitions, has his own business making videos while still in high school.

Finally, while doing Apologia Science, I discovered Virtual Homeschool Group which works with Apologia and makes science interesting for him. Super beneficial since it is free and he is NOT a STEM prodigy :). We then did the labs with Landry Academy which was a great way to have them done in an interesting and very complete way with the added bonus of meeting other home school kids from around the country.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Scaly Adventures

In 2012 we started filming short, educational videos with our son who was 12, and put them on YouTube as a fun way to inspire other kids to get out and explore their world. This idea exploded and we now have 24 broadcast television episodes airing weekly throughout the U.S. and internationally. It's been very fun to incorporate STEM concepts into our educational videos and television episodes, as we've done everything from going inside a bee yard to show how computers are used to measure the hives, to sharing the Science behind how a K-9 is trained to track a scent, to how Scientists use radio trackers on turtles and in snakes to track their patterns and learn more about their habitats. It's been an awesome journey, and one we love sharing with other students and parents! We now have over 100 free, educational videos on our Scaly Adventures YouTube channel and we're about to launch our 3rd season of broadcast television episodes with 10 new ones coming this season. Our best advice to parents is to jump into your child's passions with them and help them explore their world in super fun, creative ways! You can take just about any interest or passion and apply a STEM concept to it, and one of the easiest ways we've found to share that passion is through video and film. If parents are looking for positive, family friendly programming that's safe for kids to watch, our website is: www.ScalyAdventures.com. :-)

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MoBabee

Besides, field trips and the occasional lesson plan from Engineering is Everywhere, I pretty much take a hands off approach to the Technology Engineering part of STEM. I provide Legos and Keva Planks and other building/puzzle toys for my children to build and think like engineers. I also make sure they have things like Snap Circuits and I just let them have at it. These "toys" keep them thinking in a STEM mindset and they don't even realize they are learning.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Bud

We teach "kitchen science", so it's science plus food. My kid loves to cook, so science (and math) comes pretty easily when teaching something that tastes so good.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Writermom

We get out into science. When the blood mobile was in town, the kids got a tour and even got to hold bags of blood (if they wanted to). For botany, we went out and found leaves and took photos of trees to try to ID. I have also assigned reports on raising fruit trees so everyone can learn about our crops together. We ALL learned about how to raise butterflies and the plants they like and have helped care for hurt birds and other animals together, learning about them as we do.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Anne

I have taught Biology and Environmental Science at a homeschool co-op for three years now. Just used this lab for the first time last year, but my students totally LOVED it. Would be easy for individual students to do at home, too.
See it here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/STEM-activity-Building-a-Simple-Generator-using-Renewable-Energy-Sources-1103746

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Kmtkbest

I signed up as an educator member of the Civil Air Patrol and for only $30 got so many STEM materials we will be set for the duration!!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

sandeelynne

The single best way I've ever seen to teach science and technology subjects is through involvement with a FIRST Robotics team. I'm in my fifth year working with local teams, the mom of an alumni and a current team member, and a serious recruiter for our program. It's the hardest FUN your student (and you, if you help) will ever have! It's sports for the mind. And team members learn engineering concepts, programming, building, and electrical skills, utilizing all their math skills along the way, not to mention teamwork, budgeting, public speaking, marketing and business under nurturing mentors who are professionals in their fields.

If you have never heard of this, you have got to check it out. It's a fantastic program for the homeschooling student who wants to build real-world experience. My son, as a homeschooler, took advantage of the extra time he had to teach himself Objective C programming in six months. Then he learned Java and a couple of other programming languages. He learned leadership skills when he became the team captain his junior year (not an easy feat since he is very much the introvert!) and so many other skills. He's now a freshman in college majoring in electrical and computer engineering and I am fully confident that his four years learning all he did about STEM on that robotics team is a big reason for his early success in college (he's averaging A's and making friends - this mama is happy!).

OK - I'm off my bandwagon (and no, I don't get anything for promoting FIRST - as an educator and mentor and mom, I just really believe in the program). Want to learn more? Go to www.usfirst.org and have fun learning STEM!

4 years ago · Like · Comment
sandeelynne: Forgot to mention that the teams are for grades K-12: Jr FIRST LEGO League (Jr FLL K-3), FIRST LEGO League (FLL 4th-8th), FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC 7th - 12th) and FIRST Robotics Challenge (FRC high school).
4 years ago · Like

DonnaLou

We do a scavenger hunt at the end of the year using questions about what they learned. You have to solve the clue to get the next clue. Get them all and find treasure for the summer. Sonic gift cards, stuff for the pool, just fun prizes. Worth learning to get!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Shelly

My children really enjoy the teaching textbooks program. It has helped them be independent and really teaches step by step when they struggle with something. Nice to have fewer tears when it comes to math!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Telena

I am fairly new to being an "official" homeschooler as my 3 children went to public school up until 1-1/2 years ago. That being said, I have always spent valuable "teaching time" with my kids prior to them beginning school and during summer breaks. Early on when they started learning math facts, I bought a large bag of "Skittles". I taught the basics of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with the Skittles. It was a lot of fun for them and I would let them have just a few if they did exceptionally well. They learned very quickly and have all done extremely well in math. They are currently in 5th, 7th and 8th grade and math is one of their favorite subjects. I believe the early teaching of the math basics helped them feel more comfortable and confident.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

angie

We love apologia science! And if you have a little extra money you can purchase all the projects for the whole year through Christian Book Distribution (CBD) for about 75$. If you were to purchase all these items individually it would probably be more money. And what's even better they are labeled and put in a zip lock bag according to there lesson! Sure saves me a lot of time and effort on each project. I'm more apt to do these projects if the leg work is already done for me! Plus it the kid's favorite part of the science lesson and it helps them to remember what they have learned!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Nicole G

I'm relatively new to homeschooling, but one thing that I have already learned is that I need to incorporate at least one of the girls' interests into a lesson each week. My 8-year old has been asking for months if zebras and horses are related, and we were were able to determine exactly how as we went through our biology lesson this week, focusing on the Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, & Species classifications. She was BEYOND excited to learn it! My 7-year old loves all things dolphin,so we are incorporating the 'A Dolphin's Tale' curriculum for her next week.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Karen

I do not have the resources to purchase a lot of extra items to help me with teaching, but find that the kitchen provides quite the resources needed to teach both science and math for my second grader. There is nothing more fun than to make something fun to eat while learning about fractions, measurements, quantities, addition, subtraction, units of measure...the list could go on; not to mention the science factor of reactions, constants, variables, gasses, precipitation, chemicals.....and the list goes on here as well. HOWEVER, the absolute best part of it all, as you can imagine, is getting to eat the delicious end product! And my son has had fun all the while!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Donna

Our children love Teaching Textbooks. We also notebook for history, a great way to retain information.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

naomi

http://www.odysseyofthemind.com/curriculum.php I teach a class a stem class our co-op and found some wonderful ideas and curriculum from this website! The curriculum is detailed and complete.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Mcaxtell

When my kids were younger I used "Peep and the Big, Wide World" videos to show a cartoon to discuss the science and then they would have a follow on segment of real life science. This helped them sit still, helped me have a good direction and always the real science experiment was great fun for us to do! As they got older, I found fun videos that went along with our concepts. I found that the videos really encouraged our discussion of science. We didn't use them to "check out." Now as they are finishing middle school, I tend to have a curriculum to follow, but allow side trips to whatever interests them. YouTube videos like those created by Crash Course are a great way to liven things up if it gets too boring around here!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Shaperofthenextgeneration

Our two sons were very hands-on and visual in their learning styles and to accommodate this we used Right-Start Math which makes use of the abacus and lots of manipulatives. This helped to make math 3-D instead of just words and symbols. We also used Calculadders daily (also referred to as "math vitamins"), so they could get daily practice in the math basics. We did NOT make it a "timed" exercise as recommended, but had our sons repeat the same work sheet daily until they got 100%. Our goal was mastery, not speed under pressure. We also taught them how to play Cribbage as this game reinforced math basics in a fun way!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Kru

Last year in addition to Thinkwell Biology, I had my son pick out a course he thought was interesting from the multitudes of mooc's that are online. He picked an extremely interesting class on genetics which has now sparked a genuine interest in this field.

4 years ago · Like · Comment
mamajo: what are "moocs"? new to all this.:) thanks.
looking for curriculum for my 11th grader to prepare for SAT/ACT's and college entrance. help?
4 years ago · Like
Kru: Massive online courses like Coursera. We are working on ACT prep also. For ACT have used Dissecting the ACT and the Book of Real ACT's.
4 years ago · Like

IndoMom

We started using Science Fusion for my middle school son this year and he loves it! I ordered a good microscope to use with our Cells and Heredity module and he can't wait to get to those lessons! Just because we homeschool, doesn't mean our kids can't get good lab sciences...and he'll get much more hands-on time than kids in a large school setting. For middle and high school, a little extra money on good equipment is essential to having your kids get excited about science!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

mcmom

One of my sons loves the game "battleship" so I created a grid with numbers 1-10 on top and side. I choose where the boats go then each student calls out a math equation (ex. if we are practicing multiplication, they call out 8x4 to choose a square then give their answer. If they are correct I tell them whether that square is a "hit" or "miss. If they are incorrect, I tell them they had a "miss fire" and they have to try again for the square. The grid can be easily created using Excel, and then placed in a plastic sheet protector to be used over and over with a dry erase marker.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Photogirl33

My 9 year old son Trey loves our hands on approach to all things science and math! Manipulatives and experiments are the best part of homeschooling!!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

jeng

Our local science museums and nature centers have awesome homeschool and learning labs that we try to take advantage of every year! Even the smaller, lesser known places we've found have great educational opportunities. Our library did a summer science program where we dissected owl pellets and fun things like that (and there was no cost to us!).

4 years ago · Like · Comment

YellowHouseBookRental

We try to keep it exciting. Experiments in science are what my children have enjoyed most. With technology, hands on is how they learn best. "Show me, then let me try" seems to be the best way for them to learn.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

KatieT

We try to be as hands on as possible with math and science. When we studies insects my son didn't like the idea of killing bugs for an insect collection so we got out the good camera and he learned how to photograph the insects instead.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

HeatherM

My fifth grade daughter is a great math thinker but has been struggling with explaining her mathematical reasoning, especially in writing. To make the process more attractive to her, we've started video recording her explanations (the first day of school had her in front of the white board as the "teacher", explaining the place value chart as a review). We can then post the videos online for Grandma or her friends to see. Having an audience (at a safe distance) really encourages her to try to get her thoughts in order and express them clearly. Another tool we've been experimenting with is the Explain Everything app for the iPad, which records a "screencast" of everything the child says and does on the screen. She can solve a problem and explain the steps verbally as she does it. These recordings make great records of her progress, too.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Russ "Father of Alex"

Children do not understand what Engineers do. Engineers solve problems and focus attention to make the world a better place. We purchased designed stem to help our son understand how he can design a better world. He chose STEM and he studies three math curriculums concurrently and is doing well with fascinating education chemistry. He's just 8. We have a question for everyone. If two cars travel 15 miles and the first car is traveling 70 miles an hour and the second is traveling 60 miles an hour. Which car will arrive first? If you said the first car, you are wrong. It was the second car. Why? Because the second car left the day before. How many years will you son or daughter study chemistry? Just one year in High School? Start years earlier and get there first!

4 years ago · Like · Comment
mamajo: what is STEM?
4 years ago · Like
Russ "Father of Alex": STEM means science, technology, engineering and math.
4 years ago · Like

Mom23boys

I believe that science should be all about exploration in the younger years, so rather than picking topics for my elementary age kids, I take them to the library and let them chose books about any topic they like. My one rule is that no more than 3 weeks in a row can be on the same topic. This way my naturalist can study botany and zoology while my engineer can study magnets and construction! We also do unit studies with LOTS of experiments! Keeping it fun but simple.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

cjm

Last year we switched Math programs to Saxon. My then 7th grader went from tearing her hair out and crying in frustration to smiles and "Easy Peesy!" Her grades went up and we haven't had a tear since. What I really like about Saxon is my ability to pick and choose the lessons she needs reinforced from the 30 mixed problems that would generally be assigned as homework. I have also seen a great improvement in her ability to do mental math. The best part is that I, with my poor Math skills, am able to teach her (and learn myself) things that were previously over my head.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

DH

We love experimenting!! We just dissected a flower last week for botany. We are not afraid to experiment at all. It is so much more fun then just reading out of books

5 years ago · Like · Comment

cjm

I started my niece and nephew on the computer when they were 4 and 2, with a game from Veggie Tales. At 13 and 11, they are both fluent "keyboarders" and now prefer to do a lot of their school work writing assignments on the computer. This year the 13 year old will be learning how to do Prezi for a co-op presentation. The 11 year old has a long standing desire to create computer games for a living, so we hope to start him on that software soon.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

rachel_homeschool_mom

The GARAGE! It is all abut science and math out there. My 5 and 8 year old each have their own tool box and can get all dirty and greasy with dad. They experiment with magnets, angles putting pieces of wood together, learn about all kinds of crazy science stuff by working on the cars with dad. They both can tell you more than I can about why a car engine works. Anytime there is a project to be done, they are right there "helping".

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Jan

We have begun working on graphing in math and science. I keep washable markers near our picture window. I pick something from yesterday's lessons and have them graph it while one of my boys writes in on the glass. This has been great to help them understand the x and y axis and how to visually show information.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

JackieLKG

My daughter has been on the computer since she has been able to determine cause and effect ~ or 12 months. She is very comfortable with all digital products. For science, we watch a lot of Mythbusters online and on Netflix. It is full of vocabulary and fun explanations of why their experiment worked or didn't. One of the best ways to reinforce the Scientific Method because the go through it every time. We we study something that is related, my daughter knows exactly what episode to watch! We use the kitchen to make math and science real. We make recipes the correct way then we make it and leave something out and compare what happened. Everything we do as we go about our lives relates to something we just learned or can be used later in a lesson!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
naomi: What are some specific programs you have found on Netflix?
4 years ago · Like

homeschoolerontheedge

Hands on, hands on, hands on! When we do science we make sure it is hands on at least in some way. Depending on the kids there may be booklets to make or things to light on fire, but it is always something that they can get into. I also happen to love science so I just make sure to allow them to see me getting excited about it. If the project isn't something I am excited about - then I will tweak it or add to it to make it more fun. If you don't enjoy teaching it, why are they going to enjoy learning it.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Lana

My kids enjoy participating in the county and state science fair. It drives them to work hard, and they learn so much in the process.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

shj

I buy kits to bring living creatures into our lives -- butterflies, sea monkeys, ladybugs, and ant farms.

My kids have really enjoyed the Apologia Science Books for elementary age kids -- especially the Astronomy and Anatomy Books. There are so many easy-to-prepare, hands-on activities listed - nearly one on each page of text -- that the kids are actively learning all the time. When my six-year-old asks for "fun school," she means Apologia Science.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

TinMO

My son has been active in First Lego League and FTC (Robotics) since he's been old enough to join. He also has volunteered at a FLL summer camp to help teach younger children about Robotics. He loves Math & Science. He is a senior this year and he's taking Calculus at the community college and is doing an online advanced Physics course. He can't seem to get enough.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

AmandaC

I find changing science up frequently (every few days or week) keeps their interest. We have a biology area for plant and seed and animal observation. Days devoted to making and tinking with simple machines and planes, etc. Books and movies about other things that interest them such as animals, the human body, and space. I always thought we'd skim the tops or they'd readily forget, but I've never had trouble with that.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Terry

My boys choose math now. I no longer tell them to get to work on your math. We use KhanAcademy.org. Wonderful online, free program that offers me the ability to coach my students online. Khan Academy keeps track of everything for me.

I've even been enjoying doing math again and learning a few things I'd forgotten.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

ablackdolphin

Math is one of the most fun subjects out there. It's all about games!!! We love RightStart Math for this reason! It's very hands on and just fun.

Science is a little more of a challenge but because my husband loves it so much I have him do extra experiments with our daughter on the weekends. They love it and again it's more like a game!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

itsbaxter

We like Singapore math workbooks, they seem to help the kids understand the concepts. And I make a "mommy math" page every day to help the kids retain and review their concepts. Mommy math consists of one re-grouping problem, one time telling problem, one place value problem where they have to say a large number, and usually a more than/less than type problem.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

ntelasue

The best thing we have done for our kids is to get them involved on a B.E.S.T. Robotics team! They have not only learned much in the STEM disciplines, but also in other areas as well.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Fadar2013

I have found that doing lessons hands on works best. For Math I sometimes use fruits to represent numbers. Science is doing actual hands on experience, virtual games, like heart surgery or poke a muscle and virtual field trips. Technology watching videos to see how things work or building things to see how they work. It keeps them asking for more and they do not realize how much they are learning until we review it.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Jules

One of our favourite ways to practice our math lesson, is in the kitchen. I get my boys to choose a recipe of their choice, then we make a double batch. We always need a double batch! They have to DO the math as they cook. We then enjoy our results....lots of cookies, muffins or squares.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

LaMaestra

Here's my favorite Math tip. To introduce the process of adding fractions with different denominators. I DO NOT TEACH THE RULE! I give them a little hands on experiment that will let them find how to do it by themselves. Give them the problem 1/2 + 2/4 and let them guess the result. They might quickly say 3/6. Make them cut representations of the two fractions, tell them to cut two circles to represent the fractions they are adding. After they have succesfully drawn them, make them cut the parts and add them- put them together like a puzzle. Whoa!! They will be amazed. Now if your kids are really smart they might solve this first step rather quickly, but in order to SEE the rule you will have to go through this exercise two or three more times, like 1/2 + 3/4, 2/4 + 6/8, 1/3 + 3/6. Remember to use always the SAME GEOMETRICAL FIGURE for the representation of each fraction that you are adding. After doing it with no less than three additions, put the geometric representations of your fraction addition sentences in a row, so you can observe the pattern. Now tell them; What if I didn't have the fraction figures? Do you see a pattern that will help me get to the result of these additions without having to cut the figures? Help them see this if necessary by indicating for example that 1/2 occupies the same space (in the figures as 2/4). If you get your kids discover this rule by themselves they will be exhiliarated. You can increase the tension by offering a prize for the ones who discover the rule (make it a team effort so that everybody wins). The prize could be pizza, ice cream, and a big scream that says: YEAH!!!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Welcome@home

We have a dedicated "build/create" time built into our weekly schedule. This is often where STEM activities come into play. My children will sometimes work creatively to build something (they enjoy making a Lego city where the inhabitants have to figure out how to deal with various disasters from dinosaurs to natural disasters), work independently with various building materials (wooden blocks to Snap Circuit sets), or even create things for competitions (robots, cars, etc.). We also look at various traditional subjects through a science and technology lens. For instance, when we study history we don't study it the way most do, focusing on bloody wars and who conquered whom; we study history through technology and science (i.e. the history of transportation, how various cultures dealt with the same illness during a period of time, and what even what ancient culture had the best running water/irrigation system design). My children are emotionally sensitive and just aren't ready to handle the cruel realities in our ancient and more recent pasts, STEM based learning has been a life saver. We are African American and when we study cultural topics and general cultural history - we don't focus on the pains of slavery or the chaos of segregation (they will learn the bitter history of those times in America soon enough) we focus on scientific advancements made by minorities and women as well as learn about scientist, inventors, etc. Even geography takes on STEM characteristics as we discover the "why" behind what various regions focus on (i.e. the Dutch didn't randomly choose to export tulips, their climate and land mass makes it ideal for such an export). Allowing my children to see the world through science, technology, engineering, and math has made home schooling so much fun for them. They are natural builders, creators, thinkers, and builders - it's in their make up. They are even building their writing and public speaking skills through their focus on STEM activities. I am doing a small chemistry class for them and some of their friends (all children K-4). They will each be doing an independent project and doing a real public presentation on their project at a local college's "Chemistry Night". So, I guess you can say we STEM subjects as the spine for all of our home schooling.

6 years ago · Like · Comment
Danielle.grano: Please let me know what curriculum you use. I love this idea. Dgrancag@roadrunner.com
5 years ago · Like
Danielle.grano: I love this idea. Please let me know what curriculum to use. Dgrancag@roadrunner.com
5 years ago · Like
Twiz: I like this idea, a lot. what cirriculum/s do you use
5 years ago · Like
Twiz: Write something... contact me @ ttropea@ymail.com
5 years ago · Like
Spricetyty: Yes, what do you use? Love this idea.
2 years ago · Like

Jenhen

I think for our family it is very helpful to use every day experiences to describe science and other related subjects. Like yesterday for instance when the boys were playing with a plastic baseball in the house and broke one of my vases that was on our mantel. It seemed like that Brady Bunch episode all over again but the learned cause and effect as well as volicity. It Really makes the boys think about what would happen if they follow through with things. Life is all about science, just look around you!!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Forrest

Homeschooling for us is much more than an education choice. We have always viewed it as an exciting Lifestyle! We are learning and applying curiosity to all that we do. We live in a rural area and most days will find us studying some form of plant life or insect or other creature that was discovered in our yard. We have done stream and river studies for the Department of Natural Resources--totally free science where they provide the instruction, chemicals and materials to test for water life, check water volume, temperature, velocity, etc. We have also participated in wildlife counts and attended seminars about trees and forests and wildelife in our area. Wonderful free opportunities available to anyone who contacts their local DNR or Wildlife Management office. Technology studies for our family always begins with Legos. They have learned so many engineering and design skills through the wonders of that creative "toy". Our oldest son even continued to explore with Legos while in college and joined a Lego Robotics team that was sponsored by our local State University. Hands on opportunities are always the best way to learn. Busy hands are curious learning hands.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

csgbryan

My right brain dominant 13 yr old loved geometry for its visual nature, but hates traditional math. When we began algebra last year, I also bought a computer programming for kids curriculum. She does algebra Mon.- Wed., and spends Thur.-Friday on programming and game design. She's doing well at both, but she loves her programming days, and it reinforces the lesson that to get a desired programming or computer job, she'll have to first dig through some math trenches. Everybody wins.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Carrie

Adaptive curriculum is quite good. We are currently subscribed to gizmos, in part because they are very similar and throw in the math without doubling the price. We make models of a lot of what we study as a learning tool. Working through how to make it and why a certain way if a fun way to get them processing. We use what we have. Balloons have been bladdders, lungs, alveoli..... Recycled halloween skeletons can develop all sorts of organ systems. Four boxes or chairs make a great heart, follow the paper trail to the lungs or body. Volunteers for the valves (lub dub). Chaos happens pretty quick, but the kids (blood cells) get the oxygen/co2 where it needs to go a little before it falls apart. I'm not sure what sticks, but they liked listening with a stethiscope later. We also purchased those plastic models. Those have a lot of parts and can be tricky for younger kids and adults. Mid to older kids did fine!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Kay

We have always made the science/tech hands on here. It helps that the hubby is an engineer, but from little tots on, we have given the kiddos their own tool kits and science kits(age appropriate). They have a space to tear apart and create in our garage, and a yard to discover nature in everyday.
It's amazing what you can learn from tearing apart a broken electric can opener, or VCR!
Keeping good books on hand for referencing the back yard bugs and plants they find and keeping notebook and journals to record what they have "discovered", encourages the natural scientist them.
The kitchen is also a very good place to start with simple chemistry. We have done countless baking powder/vinegar experiments. We love glue, borax and food coloring. Bringing in snow in the winter to watch how it melts-you name it, we have probably had it happen. Like I said it's all hands on here!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Holos

The most memorable science teacher I ever had specialized in asking questions--not in answering them. Sparking the need to discover is an amazing teaching technique.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Kristi

Knowing that my 8 year-old son adores anything science or physics, we bought many home school resources at the beginning. When something strikes him as interesting, we only need to find the appropriate subject to study it in-depth. So, we don't necessarily stick with one teaching book for the year, we skip around to what interests him the most. Kind-of a cross between Montessori and Traditional Home School. He decides, but still gets a teacher...

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Bonnie

At my house we like to SEW things together. SEW stands for Sketch it Experiment with it and Write about it. By sketching and/or diagraming about science, it helps my girls to imagine what we're talking about. Plus, drawing it a heck of a lot more fun than just copying down a theory. Later, we'll conduct an experiment so the kids can literally see what they are learning in action. I don't think much beats learning first hand (and it's another way to sneak in some math). Finally, by writing about what they've learned, my girls revisit what they've learned and demonstrated to me that they actually get the concept (and I get to sneak in a little ELA).

This works terrifically for my family, but it takes a lot of work to do in practice.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Ruby Histe

We tie science into everything -- Art (Make your own paints and supplies), History (study how science shaped the world -- and How mistakes or questioning current beliefs lead to a new understanding), gym (Can we make a rope gym, how strong is a board etc)

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Lana

We do science fair projects through our homeschool group. Last year the kids were even allowed to compete with the public school students on the county level and then on to state competition for the older kids. The fun activities at the fair along with the awards and public recognition generated quite the excitement for science among our kids!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Megan

To keep science interesting for my kids I always try to choose very hands-on activities to show whatever principles I'm teaching them. They love being responsible for the results they get!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

cmac

Some of you may be interested in the Dreamspark offer, but hesitant because of the caveat to only take advantage if you will really use it. If you are on the fence, many of the Dreamspark items are available individually as freebies. Try googling the names of any of the items and you will see that Small Basic, the Express Editions and some of the game developer tools are free to download. I haven't checked them all yet, but I'm sure that others are, too. As a computer science professional with software instruction experience, however, I would recommend using a prepackaged curricula for students new to programming. The free sites have a lot of neat applications and tutorials, however, there is nothing like a good, systematic introductory curriculum to get started. After that, a motivated student can really take off with the free versions of Microsoft development products.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

momof7c

Our co-op has a class called "Make A Mess" - it is science at it's best! There is always one common theme (one week it was milk, another week it was baking soda, another week it was water bottles, etc.). While this class was started for younger kids (K-5), we have kids up to college age (and parents!) who love to participate and learn the science behind baking soda bombs, invisible writing, or tornadoes. And we do make a mess every week!!!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

M5

SImple but effective - teach only one concept at a time, give some independent work, and then give it some time to "cook"! Walk away, do something else, start again tomorrow. That's what worked best when I taught at brick and mortar school, and works best at home, too.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

bigredpen

Science, though daunting at times to teach, is something that kids can get super excited to learn! I've found that the key is to be as hands-on as possible! Don't be afraid to make a mess or go outside and get dirty! We've been watching an ant colony in our neighbor's dead tree for years... Kids also love experiments - and there are lots and lots out there that are only a Google search away. I structure our class with Sciencesaurus by Great Source, but supplement heavily with relevant You Tube videos and field trips. Most museums have a block of time during which you can get in free. If not, many are members of the Association of Science and Technology Centers. This enables you to buy one membership and get in to others across the country free or at a discounted rate. My $7.99 a month membership to Netflix also has most of the National Geographic episodes ever created.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

mom with a vision

We love technology so much we opened a computer store lol. We do a lot of creative activities with our kids homeschooling. We love Gimp (a free version of photo shop) www.gimp.org/downloads/ And National Gallery of Art NGAkids brushster lots of fun creative way to put art into technology! My 7 year old can use these on her own! http://www.nga.gov/kids/zone/brushster.htm

7 years ago · Like · Comment

6waltfl

My entire family participates in the FIRST program. We love Robotics. I coach a FIRST Lego League team, and belong to a 4h Robotics Club that covers all aspects of FIRST. My sons love it and I loved it so much that I now am on the Board of Directors of the 4h Robotics Club and help host several competitions, for kids of all ages that love STEM.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

ssaiph

We participate in the Jr First Lego League for our science and tech curriculum. There is actually more science/tech involved than there is lego play but the kids have a lot of fun! They get excited when we say "Lego"!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

ncnike7

When I get excited about something, so do my kids. Show your enthusiasm about science and your kids are sure to love it. Science rocks!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

heliconian

The big thing here in our house is nature journal. Both boys make entries several times a week. They find something and sketch it, with two different views, and record details about its size, location, and any other observations about it. This has been a great foundation for the observational skills that they need for experiments as well as an exercise in naturalism and ecosystems (we are developing a very thorough catalog of things that live in our yard). And it gives me a way to look back at how their skills have developed over time. My oldest is 10 now, and we have journals that he kept in kindergarten. This is probably my favorite thing that we do in any subject.

I also love ARTSEDGE (http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org). They have fantastic lesson plans that really mix up the subject areas. Linking art and science is always fun for me.

The guys have fun using the Gizmos on ExploreLearning.com, but, I have to confess, we've only done the free trial on that one.

7 years ago · Like · Comment

My son loves science, and I so did not have good science teachers, so I am not very confident in the area of science. Supercharged Science is wonderful http://www.superchargedscience.com/ although we have only used the free stuff. Also I found a retired science teacher who teaches at a local church and does hand-on stuff which is my son's learning style. I stay for class to learn too:) I would recommend strong networking if you don't have a strong science background. We also recently found out about http://www.firstlegoleague.org/ and someone from our local co-op is willing to coach!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

Science Fair Mom

I love taking my children to science museums and spending the whole day there! We spend multiple DAYS in the museums soaking up the science and the demos, especially in the big cities with super museums.

I have found that joining a smaller- city's museum as a family member with ASTC reciprocal membership is my best deal. We had 6 children under 18 at one time, and it was prohibitive for us to ALL go. I found a museum which charges only $65 for their family + membership, including astc membership. When we have gone to big cities like Boston or San Jose, it costs us nothing to get in the door with our membership cards - but it would be MORE than the membership fee at home to pay for museum entrance in these big cities!! Boston is $146, and the Tech in SJC is "just" $69 for a family our size without the membership.

You don't have to join the museum closest to home, either. You can look for a better price anywhere - look near grandparents, too!! - but you will get more from your membership if you are close to the museum which offers it.

Above all, ENJOY science!

7 years ago · Like · Comment
lisa: And don't forget about all the great free museums out there too such as in DC. One visit can lead to weeks of discussions. :)
7 years ago · Like
heliconian: We LOVE museums, and the memberships can be such a great deal!
7 years ago · Like

Jenn

Look for programs in your area that encourage exploration of natural areas. We just joined the Nature Challenge in our state. As a family, we are visiting selected parks, natural areas, museums, gardens, seashores, etc. and completing missions at each location. Many locations are free or have waived the fee if we are participating in the program. We have learned about wildlife, migration, habitats, history and so much more. And the kids are enjoying it without realizing that it is school. We are seeing it all with our own eyes instead of reading it in a textbook. And the program offers prizes to the kids at completion. Look for ideas or opportunities in your own area.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
GreenThumbAZ: I just Googled Nature Challenge and found an interesting FREE Curriculum at http://www.davidsuzuki.org/publications/downloads/2006/nature-challenge-teachers-guide.pdf
6 years ago · Like

lisa

For us it is simple and perhaps the most difficult for me, as mom the teacher...allowing for failures. To begin to understand that almost all science experiments fail, but some of the greatest discoveries have come from unexpected results.

Absolutely makes sense though. She learns from her mistakes by developing skills to critically analyze and modify.

7 years ago · Like · Comment
lisa: After reading Jenn's notes we also remembered one of our favorite camping pass times. So fun we don't think of it as a "class"!!!

Ranger badges are great from pre k and up. We have spent many many hours with the local rangers at various camping locations to attend their weekend family events which are free, but also to work on a Ranger badge. Everything you need is found in mother nature, Rangers can answer questions, and activities lead to other potential projects frequently. The badges also tie in well with scouting badges with just a tweak here or there.
7 years ago · Like
heliconian: Mistakes can be so hard for me - that balance between active teaching and providing a scaffolding for their learning can be really hard to find. I always lean too far one way or the other. Hopefully, it will all balance out in the end!
7 years ago · Like
lisa: Absolutely agree about the scaffolding effect. :)
7 years ago · Like

Kelliev

My best teaching tip is to JUST DO IT! It is so easy to get so busy doing "bookwork" and skip over the science experiments and projects because they are too complicated or you don't have the time. My children learn so much by getting their hands dirty...it's worth the 20 mile drive to the butcher and the drive to the store to get gloves to see the spark in my five-year-old's eyes when he got to dissect a cow eyeball. Just priceless...and he will never forget what the optic nerve and the cornea look like!

7 years ago · Like · Comment

whatsreal

HBC offers the best stuff :) like Switched on Science, but when I needed a free resource for High School math and biology I was really grateful to find Hippocampus.com

7 years ago · Like · Comment

hidngplace

I love Charlotte Mason's advice of paying attention to details! Seeing a flower and talking about how many leaves, petals, texture, smell, (not taste most of the time LOL), environment, color. Examining a bug and where it lives,what it does and how it interacts with its environment.. What appears simple is so complex. When we start to really look at things it makes us ask more questions that can lead to things like food chains,

7 years ago · Like · Comment
hidngplace: Sorry... can't figure out all the posts! or how to delete them. Definitely not doing well on the technology part of science ;)
7 years ago · Like
mom with a vision: We love technology so much we opened a computer store lol. We do a lot of creative activities with our kids homeschooling. We love Gimp (a free version of photo shop) www.gimp.org/downloads/ And National Gallery of Art NGAkids brushster lots of fun creative way to put art into technology! My 7 year old can use these on her own!
http://www.nga.gov/kids/zone/brushster.htm
7 years ago · Like
mom with a vision: Sorry thought this was where I put my reason lol
7 years ago · Like

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