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Language Arts Homeschool Curriculum

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~~ Homeschool Teaching Tips ~~


LOVING LANGUAGE ARTS!

We all want children who love to read and write because these skills, perhaps more than any other, can give our children a lifetime of pleasure, learning, and achievement.

Tell us what you do to unleash the love of reading and writing in your child, and get a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card. Our winner will be randomly drawn from posts that are entered during LANGUAGE ARTS Month.

We will do the drawing at the beginning of each month for posts in the prior month, and announce the winner in the Co-op newsletter. Your posts will remain on this page to provide ideas and inspiration to other homeschool language arts teachers! (Need help?)


bjamom

We read to our kids since they were born. Reading was something that was instilled into me as a child, and has been passed down to our children. All 3 are teens now, and it's hard to for them to put down a book. We have always enrolled in summer reading programs. Listened to books and stories on cd while traveling. They are well rounded in what they read - classics, fiction, non-fiction, religious...

3 months ago · Like · Comment

Picmom1

I beginning reading to them as soon as possible. I love the classic children stories and Dr. Seuss. Then we visit a book store were they get to pick a book. We visit the library as well. They get a library card as soon as the library allows it. Sometimes we do themes parties with the books.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

KS

Another idea that has fostered writing is to go on a nature walk. They have to find something that catches their eye and write a story as if they are that item. How did it get where it was found? How does the item view the world? Things like that.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

KS

Of course, reading aloud as much as possible. Using a curriculum that offers tons of book suggestions has really helped. My son loves reading time at night with his dad too. My boys also love listening to Adventures in Odyssey stories or Brinkman Adventures every night at bedtime.
Writing is a bit more of a challenge but they are still young. My son likes when I give him 5 or 6 words and he has to make up sentences to tie them together.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Angela 79

We spend so much time in the car driving from place to place. While in the car, we listen to audiobooks from the library to make good use of the time. My daughter often gets so engrossed in the stories that she doesn't want to leave the car once we get to the destination. She sometimes borrows the book from the library after hearing it because she enjoyed it.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

JessicaW

We read the book, watch the movie and then read the book again to look for differences in the story line. Then I have them write about the differences....why they think somethings were left out of the book or the movie...why somethings were added. I also have them write about which version they felt was better and why. Would they have made those changes, etc. The first time we did this, it started off kind of slow, but then it became sort of like detective work, which my son LOVES. He really got into trying to think like the author!

1 year ago · Like · Comment

TMiyashi

I tell my kids that they have to read the book before they get to see the movie. This worked every time; even with ALL of the Lord of the Rings books. They actually got to the point where they wanted to read the book before seeing the movie. Better reading made better writing.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

SHMOF4

I have always read to my children aloud. I then came across a s in mole reading program that only requires you use one book called "Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons"! My children start thus book at age 4. By the time they are 5 they are reading on a second grade level. I encourage them by making a reading rewards chart. Every time they complete a lesson they get to put a sticker on the chart. Once they reach 10 lessons they get to choose a reward from the reward bucket. Every 50 lessons we take them to their favorite store and they get to pick out a bigger reward of something they have been wanting. This system has really helped excite them about reading. Sometimes they even ask me to do 2 lessons in one day.

I haven't found any good writing tricks yet. So far my 6 year old can write simple words including her name. If I say a word out loud she knows how to sound it out and figure out what letters to use. I'll be reading the rest of these entries to get some ideas :)

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Bud

We just simply read to our kids any chance we got: at night before bed, while we eat at the dinner table, on vacation in the car, whenever we have down time. Plus, we both love reading, so they see us reading so much as well.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

tmasters

To increase the love of reading poetry, we'll hold a Poetry Tea Party. Snacks to eat, tea (or other beverage in our case) to drink, and an assortment of poetry books are available to read. We spend quality time together learning about poets and reading on the couch. Occasionally, we'll an an artist or composer to the day which means we'll listen to music or create masterpieces using the artist's medium or style.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

tmasters

I like to create Bingo boards with different book titles, genres, or reading activities for my daughter. Her goal is to get three-in-a-row working on a vertical, diagonal, or horizontal Bingo. Sometimes I will write in a book title with a project in each box. This activity gives the child choices. After a Bingo is completed, then I sometimes give a small reward for completing the set of activities. I've done this with vocabulary words too. I offer several fun activities to practice her words. I'm always on the lookout for fun reading and writing activities that'll promote a love for learning!

1 year ago · Like · Comment

tmasters

I started doing book reports differently. I wanted book reports to be more hands-on, fun, and more meaningful to my daughter. One activity that we do is called "Book Report in a Bag." My daughter truly enjoys this activity! She'll read a picture or chapter book. Then, she must choose 5-10 items from the house related to the important events from the plot. This is her favorite part. She'll draw a picture of the main character on the front of the bag. I allow her to use any medium she wants - she can create a side craft and glue it on if she desires.Then, on the back she'll draw one or more illustrations representing the setting(s). On the sides of the bag or on a separate sheet of paper if desired she'll write a summary for the story using the Somebody Wanted But So Then method which works wonders with little ones. I also have her give a presentation. She'll state the title, author, and illustrator while holding the book. Then, she'll describe the outside of her bag and tell me about each item she chose for inside the bag and why. I love hearing her explanations! I've used this activity with a class I teach as well. This is one way that I try to encourage a love of reading and writing. After completing this activity, my 8-year-old daughter (Age 6-7 then) asked to do three more that week. Needless to say . . . it was a huge success in my home. :)

1 year ago · Like · Comment

purplesquirrel

As with many others, simply reading to my children from infant-hood was the first step~ with expressively animated voices to catch their attention.
Finding GOOD stories for them read (sometimes can be a chore these days, when the libraries are clearing their shelves of great OOP books. :( ), which leads to...
Buying books at Library Book Sales~ if they clear the good stuff out, we want to be able to find it on our shelves. And having the books accessible at home is fantastic, even if they take up a lot of space. If the kids are reading, it's worth it! :)

Writing is trickier, but I think one major help is to let them narrate, even after they are "able" to write~ it will help their words flow more quickly when they don't have to worry about spelling and letter formation. Using Story-Builder Cards are great fun as well.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

chmnberry

I had a reluctant reader and writer. To solve this, I would get copies of books from the library that also had audio versions. I would play the audio version in the car or at lunch to get my son hooked on the story. Instead of stopping at the end of a chapter, I always stopped the story in the middle of the action. My son would beg to find out what happened and I promised him that he could read ahead in the print version of the book as a reward when his school work was finished. It worked like a charm. By making reading a reward, 10 years later, I am proud to say that my now high school son is definitely a reader! Our favorite writing activity was also presented as a reward. It is a neverending story that our whole family writes. The rules of the story is that each family member rotates and writes the next page in the book. So, the story twists and turns in different directions. It also provides the kids with a challenge to make the story make since when the scenes and action has changed. Having homeschooled for 15 years, this ongoing project is a treat to look back at how everyones writing has progressed. It also has worked to help siblings respect each others abilities.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

staceorama

My child struggled with Language arts, likely due her dyslexia and slow processing speed. Humor in write and reading assignments (all subjects actually) helps her relate, pay attention, and want to participate. Reading and writing can be very entertaining and fulfilling, so we focus on topics that are meaningful and sometime just plain silly! I rewrite a lot of her curriculum (use basic idea but change words to include people she knows well and silly happening) to make it engaging!

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Ellen

I started reading to my babies before they could even sit up by themselves. We still read together daily, almost 12 years later. They see me reading, and my love of literature is contagious. It's very easy to share something that you love. I would have been much more surprised if my children were NOT readers. :-)

1 year ago · Like · Comment

chinadoll

Reading has honestly never been an issue in our family. I was an emergent reader at age 3, my oldest was reading short chapter books at 4, and my baby was doing the same at 5. What did I do? My mom read to me all the time, so I did the same with my boys. They always saw me with my nose stuck in a book.

Writing, however, is a challenge. I love to write almost as much as I love reading. I just tend to think so fast that my fingers can't keep up, even on the computer. My oldest is Autistic, so he has trouble with the physical process of writing. Even using the computer is harder.... It's that he thinks so much differently. He keeps his writing to a minimum - but I've never seen another kid do one of those 5 paragraph essays in 3 sentences. Everything the teacher wanted was there - just not the "fluff". The baby (he's 14 now) does a lot of free writing. He's very meticulous about it, though. He has to have everything planned out before he puts pencil/pen to paper or fingers on the keyboard. Still, it works for them, so it works for me. I do help with the "fluff".

1 year ago · Like · Comment

rblomer

We do lots and lots of reading as that is the very best way to impart the love of reading! Starting when they were little, I would read out loud to them. As they have grown older I still read out loud, but also encourage them to read on their own by providing many books in subjects that they are interested in. If they express and interest in a subject/series we don't have, we go to the library.

Each day, part of their schoolwork routine is to read a book themselves, read one to their little brother, and then we read out loud. This way they have access to multiple levels of writing. They also love being about to "help" their little brother. It makes them feel successful, helpful and smart! Plus, it is good for him, too! Reading out loud and to themselves also helps by hitting the different aspects of learning. Visual and auditory are both covered automatically, and kinesthetic is covered by them moving and fiddling with busy toys while I am reading out loud. I want them to enjoy the reading, so I go out of my way to make the reading out loud as fun as possible! If they are in the mood, we snuggle. If they are in a more active mood I let them roll on the floor or play quietly with toys. They worst thing you can do is make it a struggle, since that will give them a bad association with reading!

As far as writing, have journals for everything! One for field trips where they can record where we went and what they saw. A science one to write and draw about our science experiments. They each have a personal one where they can write whatever they want.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

Jen120983

We do a lot of reading aloud and every time we go to the library, I allow my daughter to choose books in addition to the ones I pick. It gives her ownership and excitement.

1 year ago · Like · Comment

mom4

Our family loves books and loves to read. Even when the kids were newborns, I would read to them. Now that they are older, they love to read books on their own. I still read out loud to them. Sometimes we take turns reading out loud to each other. Just about every week we go to our local thrift stores and bring home new books to read. The kids take time to read each night in the bed before we turn out the lights. They also like to write stories that they have made up. Last year two of our boys won a ribbon at the county fair for their poem and short story. One of my sons has written several short stories and even draws illustrations of the characters to go with them. We also always have books checked out from our local library.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

HaitiMama

We are missionaries living in Haiti. We do not have access to a local library. Instead, we have purchased at Kindle so that our kids can borrow e-books from our US library. This has been wonderful! Now they can plug in to a world of reading that they never would have had here. Thankful for technology like this that gives access to great books for FREE.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

suguinn

Writing has always been fun. They ve helped me illustrate stories I ve written, and I ve helped them write their stories by recording their words as they show me the illustrations of the story they want to write. Using newspaper templates, they have written about concerts, local construction, and Olympic performances as well as persuasive letters to the editor trying to convince Mom into getting a pet snake. Using online publishers, we ve published their own short stories or Blogs. Sometimes they lose their excitement towards finishing the last illustrations, then I assign them one page at a time to break up the task into smaller, doable bits. They all love reading each other s published books.

Since they were too small to understand the words, I ve held them on my lap and read stories to them. As they grew, so did the titles of books we ve read together. Some of my favorite memories are rainy day reading marathons, lunch time biographies, Sunday afternoons reading in the garden, discovering that my 3 year old had been memorizing poetry right along with his siblings. He also insisted on helping act out scenes from As You Like It. And I won t forget the night my five year olds eyes welled up in happy tears while we read Heidi. Reading aloud to my kids has brought to life many titles that would have been too complex for them to read themselves at such young ages. My son loved Watership Down so much when he was 6 or 7 that after I d read it aloud, he listened to it on audio several times. Each night, I also have something I m reading for myself. Now they get out their own books to read right along beside me.

I love reading and writing, and by doing it together, the love gets passed on.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

MommyToTwo

From the time my kids first started school, we have written "books" for anything they wanted to learn more about. At first, I would type out what they had to say, and then they would find pictures or draw illustrations that I would scan in and add. I would print out the books and take to Kinkos for binding. We have since discovered photo books. The kids write up their text for the book, add photos (their own or illustrations saved as images, or find copyright free ones with my help on that). The photo books often have 40% off coupons. It does not cost much to end up with a beautiful hard-cover book. You can even do text-only pages. These even work as gifts to relatives. You can have a cover page with photo or whatever you want. It is really fun and memorable.

2 years ago · Like · Comment
suguinn: Good idea for them write their own non-fiction books. Thanks
2 years ago · Like

MommyToTwo

From the time my kids first started school, we have written "books" for anything they wanted to learn more about. At first, I would type out what they had to say, and then they would find pictures or draw illustrations that I would scan in and add. I would print out the books and take to Kinkos for binding. We have since discovered photo books. The kids write up their text for the book, add photos (their own or illustrations saved as images, or find copyright free ones with my help on that). The photo books often have 40% off coupons. It does not cost much to end up with a beautiful hard-cover book. You can even do text-only pages. These even work as gifts to relatives. You can have a cover page with photo or whatever you want. It is really fun and memorable.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

okimommy

I foster love of reading and writing in my kids by showing them how much I love reading and writing myself. I get very excited when I read a new book or find an old one that is like an old friend. I make time to read myself every day and make sure they see it. I really talk up books that I read at their ages and tell them how much they will love them, like I am sharing a special secret with them. They know that I love reading and writing, and that love is contagious. I also make sure that we read together as a family regularly. We use living books through out most of our curriculum choices, so they are exposed to many different genres. Reading is a way of life in our home.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Lucy Ling

My love for books and reading was fostered in my son by allowing him to explore books and ideas he was interested in. He has always been fascinated in war strategy and I let him submerge himself in the battles while I focused on the history surrounding them. He is now a teenager and going to the bookstore is still a special time for he and I. I love to find him sitting in the floor with a pile of books begging me for them! I can't think of a better way to spend my money.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Broxy

I started reading to my son when he was a baby. He has since been reading ahead of schedule! Now that he's in middle years, I give him a list of books to choose from so he can decide what will grab his attention!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

CleaMay

Start reading when they're itty bitty. Not only picture books, but also chapter books!
As they learn words, point while you read pausing to let them read the words they know! Incorporate music, art, science, or cooking projects to encourage linking what they read to something they create.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Vikki

We quiz with vocabulary cards in the car, and my son reads harder and harder books because he finds he already knows most of the words and feels good that he can read "big books".

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Jessica I.

I have read to my three children since birth. Reading is part of our everyday life. When I read to them I make sure to use different voices to bring the story to life.
My husband and I read to our kids at night as a family. The older ones will take turns reading to us as well.
One fun thing the kids love doing is, reading a book then checking to see if there is a movie on the book and comparing the differences. They can compare what the characters looked liked in their imagination verses the movie.
I buy them special note books and encourage them to write what ever they want with out pressure about grammar and spelling.
We homeschool so they already have lessons on the rules of writing.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Shanie

First, I love to read myself. At all times, I have a book I'm reading aloud to both kids and a book for each child separately. I used to do unit studies on books, which required my son to answer questions after each chapter. I thought this was a waste of time. Now, he & I both read the book and have a literary discussion on it. I also choose great literature, both classics and ones I know my son will like. For writing, I often give my son the freedom to write on topics he chooses. He has created amazing stories on these. My daughter, in kindergarten, is starting to love to write too. I just make sure not to correct her too much right now (except capitals and periods) so she learns to love to write.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Rebecca L

We've been reading together since my son was born so reading isn't an issue... spelling is! I've tried various ways to make spelling fun in our house. When we first started spelling lessons, I would put two cushions on the floor across the room from each other. He had to say the word on one cushion, spell it while he ran (or walked) between the two, and then say the word again when he reached the second cushion. There was a lot of extra running and jumping and laps around the house, but we got it done. Now, he's in third grade and can sit still longer, but he still hates spelling. I give him a Silly Sentences Spelling Test at the end of every week where he has to fill in the blanks with his spelling words while I dictate the sentence to him. An example from last week when we were learning some "K" words - "The KITTEN with the KNIFE threatened the KIDS menacingly." The sillier the better...

2 years ago · Like · Comment

bartman

We read living books, listen to audiobooks together, and have weekly poetry tea times (Brave Writer).

2 years ago · Like · Comment

CO_Mom

I have always read books to my children. When they were younger, "homeschool" mornings were spent in front of the fireplace, reading books like Pinnochio (the real one, not Disney's version!), Charlotte's Web, and a favorite - Norse Mythology! Our family is also blessed with my mother-in-law, who always gifts us with great books. She has an uncanny knack for sifting through the bargain bin at a bookstore and finding the gems. We hit the library weekly (sometimes more) and the kids are allowed to choose their own books. I often choose additional books (nonfiction, since my kids are most likely to go for the fiction) and leave them available on a coffee table. They usually can't resist picking up a book that hasn't been read, even if it's not one they chose. :)

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Gallila

If I could choose only one thing that encourages reading and a love of language in children, it would be reading good books to them. It has been my absolute joy, and has done more for my kids' usage and vocabulary than anything else. It's also given them a strong background in classical mythology and classic literature. Children can understand books that are several levels above their own reading level, and there are many delightful and well-written versions of classics targeted to middle schoolers that we read to our kids. There is nothing like having your middle schooler recognize allusions to Don Quixote in Steinbeck or to the Aeneid in Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia.

Like many others here, we had a weekly trip to the library. It's become semi-monthly with one teenager left homeschooling, but both kids still love to check out an entire shelf of books on a topic that interests them.

Audiobooks are another great tool. We always have a new book for car trips, and we all have a personal book going on our iPods/phones. Some of our best family talks come out of those. And the theatre is a great resource, too. We live in an area with many options for reduced-price educational performances. There are still our favorite field trips.

I'm back in the classroom now, teaching high schoolers, and I can pretty much tell which kids were read to as young children. Even if they are not the strongest readers/writers, they have the ability to enjoy and/or appreciate a good story. In my opinion, it's the best (not the only, the best) thing we homeschoolers can do for our children's education.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

homemom

I love to read and hoped early on that my children would also develop a love of reading. I read to them on a regular basis but I think what they enjoy the most is the ability to go to the library on a regular basis. We go weekly and I don't limit the number of books they can get. They have discovered so many things by reading the random books that they pick up.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

COHSMom

Now that our boys are in High School and after reading many of the posts, I really miss those early learning days! It is so wise to spend that time reading to those "wee ones" and enjoying their love in looking at the pictures and asking questions about the books you are reading to them. And then once they begin to read to find those books that really "spark" an interest and allow them to be excited about reading! When our boys were in Grades 1 -3 -- they were not big on writing, so I used "Creative Thinking - Write-Abouts" that I picked up at a Homeschool Conference. They offer great combinations for fun, silly and creative stories. As they got older I appreciated "Jump-In Writing and "The Lifeguard's Locker" for writing helps and prompts. It worked out great. We also enjoyed many books on tape. Today, one of our son's is using an on-line English program for his writing and the other one is involved in American Literature. We also felt fortunate to find an on-line writing resource that provided 8-week workshops, that have been very beneficial. Today, by the Grace and Blessing of God we still enjoy listening to some books on tape together, and other "adventure" tapes while we have our Art Class. What a blessing those early years were, I look back on them with great fondness and thankfulness, as we press forward to their last couple of years in High School.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Bhadreshwar

Who's life is not Busy? Who's mind does not fill with jobs that should be done that moment every time your 5 year old comes to you and asks you to read him a story? This is partly why I love educating my children, I can totally justify saying no to the list of jobs and yes to my child because I know that cuddling up and reading to them as often as I possibly can is soooo good for them and our family. All of us enjoy audio books, a story in the car, a story to take a break, a story to teach something in particular. Books everywhere and accessible, even to your 2 year old, yes the books will need to be tidied all the time but hey that's their job, right? We make up our own stories, we think of three things that must be included and then take it in turns to tell the next part of the story, it can be hilarious! We have found all these things create such a wonderful desire in the children to discover for themselves and read, try to read and even pretend to read!

When imagination is inspired, writing is a little less laborious, especially if it has a genuine purpose. Treasure hunts where clues must be written, secret letters for a detective story, real letters for family and friends. This isn't our 7 year olds favourite activity but it is certainly easier if we prepare the way and really give them a reason to write.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

j2juliano

We started reading to the kids when they were born. We keep lots of books, fiction and nonfiction, around the house and we do a lot of read alouds as a family. We also model reading. I have 2 older teens who devour books and love to read. My third is dyslexic so it was more of a struggle for him, so we found audiobooks are a good choice for him. We start writing by sending personal letters to family and friends. We have great people who write back and I find that is the key! My kids love to get letters in the mail.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

gina

We first engendered a love for reading by reading daily to the kids when they were little, by modeling to them the value of reading by always being in the middle of several books ourselves, and very importantly, by limiting the amount of screen time they would have access to. I can't stress enough how important this latter point is. Certain personalities seem to be magnetically attracted to a screen, but when it is no longer an option, there is no end to the development that can happen. My oldest son has time type of personality. We limited screen time, though, from the get-go, and he is now my MOST avid reader. He devours books and reads and even re-reads them.

Over the past couple years, we formed a kids reading group with some friends. We have the kids read a book-- usually a classic -- and then get together for a book discussion day. We discuss the various literary aspects of the work, break for lunch and then watch a movie that was based on the book. After the movie, we compare and contrast the two media. It has been a wonderful experience for all of them. They always look forward to it, and almost invariably decide that the book is so much better than the movie version!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Esther

First, modeling: I read. Second, sharing: I read to my kids. Since they were tiny, reading has been associated with cozy together time. Third, more sharing: we listen to audio books (mostly in the car). Fourth, more sharing: Since we're experiencing books together, they become part of our family culture -- we talk about books, we remember lines from books, we laugh over books together, we learn life lessons from books, and characters from books have become family friends. [So we're CAREFUL what we read!]
Even my dyslexic 11 year olds LOVE to read even though it takes them a REALLY long time to get through a book. With writing I think the wanting to put words on a page follows from having enjoyed the written word so much.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Karen in OK

We love to read lots of rich classical literature even if it is completely above our children's heads. We love to discuss the characters in these great works and talk about the life lessons we can learn from them and the stories. On the other end of that spectrum, we love to read lots of whatever they pick up (assuming we approve of the content). We read silly books, we read book series, they read book series on their own, etc. Most importantly we read the Bible to them and my oldest who can read well also reads the Bible each morning before getting up. We can think of no greater book to foster good learning and a hunger to read.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Nancy in NH

We love to 'go deep' and take our time when we read a great work of literature. We spend a lot of time talking. Sometimes these discussions lead my kids towards a developing thesis for an essay. Sometimes we just enjoy a book and the discussions and forgo a writing assignment. I don't have any set expectations when we begin reading something, but I watch how interest and the discussions develop and we go from there.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Jean J

My daughter uses Total Language Plus (high school). For the section that involves Critical Thinking, we sit down together and discuss the questions, instead of writing. We have had some very good discussions. I figured there is plenty of writing to do already in the curriculum and this helps her with the thought process!!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Lieve

Like they say in The Read Aloud Handbook by Trelease; reading aloud to children every day is the best way; demonstrating first hand the importance we place as a family on reading and writing .

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Shelise

I read out loud everyday. They also listen to audiobooks on CDs from the library and epic books.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Ms_Ann_C

We are bibliophiles, read aloud, have books everywhere and the local Librarians call us by name. I also print Story Paper, where he writes his favorite part of a story and draws a picture.

Since my son was a baby and upward, he has seen me playing video games on my computer. This involved reading quests for my characters. I would allow him to sit on my lap and I would point at the screen and read the quests aloud to him. We bought the Comfy Easy PC system for him as a baby, so he could emulate Mommy and Daddy.

When he was three, I joined a (now defunct) children s website and made an account for him and myself. At first, I read the quests to him as his character progressed. I gradually showed him how to sound out words and he eventually, but proudly, read the quests with understanding to himself.

We also joined JumpStart, a 3-D interactive world, with K-8 things to do and Discovery Education, where I assign educational activities for him.

I think the most important part is that we, his parents, interact with him and show him real-world examples of the three R s daily.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

BeckyG

Looking back, one thing that I feel that I did right in our home (there weren't many) was to read to my daughter every day when she was very young, up to the time that she could read herself. I believe this more an anything, gave her a love for books, reading and writing. Now in high school, she is an avid reader, is taking some early college courses, and is doing very well. She is also very creative and writes well too. I attribute that to her love of reading and the vast array of books that she has consumed. Her writing abilities are likely due to the great amount of writing practice she has had.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

DQ

I give my kids choices of books within reason. Since we follow a unit study approach, I'll fill a basket with books on that topic. Then later, they can each share insight on the topic from their books as we discuss what is fact and what is fiction. Also, when one of my children said, "I want to write my own novel," I said, "Great!" and got her started with some curriculum to guide her. Then all three of her siblings decided they too wanted to write a novel. Now they are all in the midst of writing a novel complete with planning story lines, editing and publishing. Giving them ownership in their education has made a word of difference.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Sara1031

We are always reading ourselves and our home is filled with books. We have read to our boys since before they were born, make frequent trips to the library, and encourage their attempts at reading and writing independently, no matter how small.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

readingmom

We've tried MadLibs (which they liked), card games, formal writing, report writing and journaling. The journaling worked the best for writing. We've recently tried Brave Writer, The Writer's Jungle course, and I discovered that it was best to let him record his freewrites and then transcribe them for revision. This is a child who loves to read (up to 25,000 pages a quarter in school)

2 years ago · Like · Comment

AnaMaree

Lots of out loud reading together, taking turns with words, making sure she picks out books, stopping before she gets bored or stressed, making sure there are a few books easy enough for her to read. For writing she has a journal she can draw anything in and write the words as she wants (cinderella is CNDRLA) then I write small at the bottom more details she dictates to me so the correct spelling is there without it being a "correction" (she is only 5 and I am just trying to get her to enjoy writing at this point, something she struggles with). We have two other journals, one that she is given assignments in (What was your favorite part of the day? How could we have handled that situation better?) and a science dictionary where I write the words and she draws a picture defining the word. We also play LOTS of games, rhyming bingo is a favorite.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Vikki

I have my son write invitations to swim parties or sleepovers, etc. and then thank you notes. He gets excited about the event and not even a grumble about all the writing!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Laura E

We have listened to countless audio books since they were young. This has given them a love for stories and an appreciation for the spoken work. We have also made family reading time before bed a priority, with each member choosing a book to be read aloud. Book clubs and ample free time to read have aided making books and reading a priority in our homeschooling.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

LindaB

To foster a love for learning, I make sure they have access to good quality books that interest each child. We also enjoy reading aloud as a family. To encourage them to enjoy writing, we often write together- sometimes letters to loved ones, letters of encouragement, or a bigger project like making our own books.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Mongolianmama

I make sure we make lots of library trips, lots of free reading time, and I buy them neat journals to encourage writing.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

CTMom

Go beyond boring. Make their interests a priority in reading selections and writing topics. Let them explore above/below "appropriate" reading levels, even picture books. Study film, anime, tv versions of favorite books, then research how an author was connected - or not - to the screenwriting/adaptation. By discussing the choice to include/exclude book portions, or elevate/diminish certain characters/settings, students learn the interaction of reading/writing/communication. It can be motivating for kids to see that there's more to a story than a movie might reveal. Or that a book poorly written can be transformed by a good screenwriter/producer/actor wanting to add depth and exploration.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mtmaw

I have always read to my kids...even before birth. Now I have one avid reader and one who could care less. But I always make sure there are plenty of books that interest each of them. We have scripture study and take turns reading from our current "fun book", first thing in the morning. They both love Minecraft, so they can earn extra time playing by reading extra minutes outside of our "school" reading. And I have books, all over the house. If there is a clean surface there is bound to be a book put there. I surround them with books and talk often about my love of books. Last Christmas, I bought my older daughter a copy of my favorite book "Jane Eyre". She is eating it up. And got my son a copy of "King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table", he loves super heros and adventure. Hoping we can read it together after he finishes his current book. Love...that is the key to getting them to pick up books. My love and fostering their love.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

CornerstoneKat

I award bookworm tickets to my girls for completing their school work or for good behavior. They can redeem the tickets to have a book of their choice read by the adult of their choice. They love it! You can even download the bookworm tickets I use here--http://cornerstoneconfessions.com/2015/03/add-variety-to-your-childs-reading.html

2 years ago · Like · Comment

selah7

We read the Bible out loud and encourage even the newest reader to read out loud during family time. Out of all the reading programs and time invested, this one thing has had the most impact in improving reading skills. We also encourage our kids to read by keeping a record of all the books they have read. They like seeing the page fill up. We usually do 2-3 writing assignments a month and reward tickets for completing goals set for them. They use the tickets to pick out gifts.
Even without a reward, they enjoy sharing their stories with others.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

JenA

I found pen pals for my kids. They love getting the letters in the mail and responding to them!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mrsajohnson

We are enjoying John Fitzgerald's Great Brain - my 3 boys love reading about the adventures of these 3 brothers.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

K

I am not a person who enjoys reading for pleasure. I know how to read I have just never taken much time to focus on reading for pleasure. However I want my children to enjoy reading and to rep the benefits reading has to offer. To help with this we have a variety of books available at all reading levels with a variety of interests. I read to them, with them and in courage them to read on their own and to eachother.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Brandie

I think exposure is the key and witnessing others enjoying literature. Listening to audio books in the car, reading aloud to them, encouraging them to read, going to the library. Their favorite is going to the library book sale when a box is only $5. I give each child a box and say get whatever you want. They have learned to love books through all of this!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

When my girls fill up their chore chart with stickers, I take them on a special day out to the book store to pick a brand new book and have lunch at the park. Afterwards, we come home and read their new books together!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

jema777

Aside from the daily homeschool reading lessons, I simply read to my children aloud everyday, frequently twice a day. They also see their dad and me reading, so they know that even as adults we still love reading. We have quite a large home library as well as Kindles, so there is no shortage of books in this house. Sometimes instead of reading, we make up stories to tell each other. My children are young and not writing yet, but I've written some of the stories down myself and my oldest has drawn illustrations to go along with some stories. She has much interest in it, so I'm sure she'll be writing stories on her own as she gets older.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Write something. . . we read out loud to our children every day. They connect reading with "special time" with mom or dad and therefore look forward to our daily reading sessions. -Holly V

2 years ago · Like · Comment

corrie

To inspire a love of reading and writing, I read to my kids every day. I have been doing it since they were babies and now that my oldest is 12, I'm reading chapter books still to them along with their own reading by themselves. They still love to sit and listen to a good book. I make sure that I'm reading every day before rest time with my 4 year old still too. We also make it a priority to get the library about once a week. I've been amazed at how just this has given a love for reading especially. They all live to read, for which I am so thankful!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Koodaigirl

One of the things that seems to have fostered a love for reading in our home is the read-aloud books we have done together, as a family. I still remember, early days, when my son (newly learning to read on his own) asked me, "If I learn to read, will you stop reading to me?" This was a sure sign that he was willing to "stop" his learning process, if it meant he was risking the end of read-alouds! I assured him that I would read out loud to them both for as long as they wanted. And, we do still (they are in high school!) I think, similarly, writing together and reading our writing to each other has fostered a hunger to write more. Their dad writes, I write and they write---we all share when we have written and celebrate the enjoyment of hearing each other's words.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

2BoysMom

I find that my boys are most inspired to read and write when they are learning or doing something they love. We often discuss what we love or what we want to learn more about and then I feed that desire with good books. We write about what we have learned or complete projects. It may seem like a simple or obvious idea, but when they start asking questions, doors begin to open in their minds to learning about more and more. That is when their desire to read and write begins to explode.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

7kids

I start my kids out reading "Teach your child to read in 100 Lessons" as soon as they are interested in reading. The youngest was 3-1/2, the oldest 5 year old. They get a sticker every day, and after 50 lessons they get a gift. After 100 lessons or 100 days of reading (I sometimes switch books after 75 lessons), they get a big gift. I continue to read out loud to them. They also receive a gift after their first chapter book. By then they are hooked, and I actually have to pry them off their books. ;-)

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Jaynev

I started homeschooling in September and due to issues with public school both my girls were a little sick of Language arts, especially the writing portion. So we started our year with a class about letter writing. The good old fashioned art of sending letters to friends and family. then we started writing letters. The girls have been writing to grandmothers and great grandma, aunts and friends that live a distance away. they love to get the letters in the snail mail. Then spend time writing back, answering questions and asking questions to get to know their family better. It has been so much fun to see their excitement at receiving the mail and being so enthusiastic to share with family their news.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Jnavrotsky

I help teach my kids to love reading and writing by choosing subjects they are most interested in. Once they have finished reading the book, they get to draw a picture about it and write a few sentences describing what they learned. In essence, they get to make their own story page. They love it!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mamamia

I love to read whenever I have free time, and my kids see me laughing and want me to share what I'm reading. They have realized that reading can be fun and stimulating. Often you'll find our whole family in the living room reading our own books. I also read aloud to my kids. My teenagers even enjoy the books I read to my 11 and 12 year olds. My kids like to write more when it isn't assigned school work. They make up stories or lists, etc. Copywork has really helped because they copy one or two Bible verses each week. They like doing that and they read and write on paper and in their hearts at the same time.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

bethmg

Even now that my children are 11 and 12 years old, I read to them every day. And I leave lots of books sitting out on various surfaces in the house -- which they invariably pick up, start to read, and then can't put down!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

2ndgenteacher

I believe I started homeschooling about 30 years ago. As I type I am teaching the last of my children. He is 17 and the youngest of nine. All nine are avid readers and devour books (some faster than others. The earliest readers were about age 4. The late bloomers were about 10! ACK! They never knew they were SLOW...and we kept it that way. I wanted them to LOVE reading... not dread it! The two who were so slow had vision disabilities. We conquered them and thankfully they love books, love reading, love to learn.
My way of helping the vision impaired children to read was to read the right page and they would try to read the left page. The pressure would be off for a while and they could actually enjoy the story line. It was hit and miss with our son as we figured this out. I realized one day ( he was about 9) that he was NOT interested in Dick, Jane, and Sally. I gave him a book about a horse. Small print, big words and all. He muddled through it with me reading every other page. It was a sort of ecstasy and agony of sorts but I knew I had gotten it right when about a week after starting this I "caught" him reading a head! Oh joy!
So home school moms the best advice is Don't panic. Take it slow for some and all will work out.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

cwright

When the kids were little, we did a lot of reading aloud. As they got older and when life gets crazy busy, we download audio books from the library. We listen in the car and the kids listen when they go to bed at night.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

RobinD

I make sure to read and write in front of my kids. When I was growing up, my mom would prop up a book in the kitchen and read while she worked and she'd write these wonderful long letters to people as well as keep a diary. We loved to read what she wrote about our family and how it all became a story. So now I keep a blog that my kids enjoy reading, I sit and read while they are playing. It's one thing to tell kids to love reading and writing but it's so much more compelling to demonstrate!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Angela McMillan

To motivate my children to read, I tell them they get their own library card when they are able to read. Weekly trips to the library also have instilled a love of the written word. Even my highest energy children will sit down and look thru books.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

shernandez

Reading together has just become a part of every day life. Even my 3-year-old constantly brings me books to read to him. We also enjoy trips to the bookstore and library. I think the biggest thing that has made my kids love reading is our special reading time at night. Each night, I read to each kid alone. We snuggle in their bed, grab a good book, and read it. I start with my youngest and go to my oldest. Even just 10 minutes of snuggle time with each child makes them feel special, and gives me a chance to spend time with just that child reading something that interests them.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

LifeG8mom

I read aloud to all of my children. I have found that they never get too old to read aloud. To foster a love for writing, I started early. When they were small, we would make up stories in the car, each person would add a sentence. We did this orally before we put it to paper.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

LaurenB

My older seems naturally to love reading so I taught him how to request books online for our library. I usually pick some outside of his current interests and "strew" them. My younger loves looking at books and being read to, and is deeply into "What does that say?" so I point as I read.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

TeacherYaz

For my daughter, age 12, it took a summer reading adventure where she explored every genre to see how she liked each one. I had her pretend to be a book critic, which made her pay close attention to details that may have otherwise overlooked. This gave her a new found love for mysteries, but cultivated a desire to read more and more in all the genres as she discovered each had wonderful things she could enjoy. For writing, I used her love of PowerPoint. She summarized her books with pictures, funny transitions and audio to make the book come alive for me. This summer she has a new found love of Pinterest, which I already plan to utilize as another outlet for her to write and share her love of books.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

KristiL

I think reading a variety of books helps foster a love of reading. I have boys 15, 13, 10, and 7. I am constantly going through reading lists and checking out books at the library to have available for them to read. Some of my favorite book lists are from Sonlight and Veritas Press. Once they like a particular book or genre, I seek out similar books for them or other books by the same author. For instance I may check out the first book of a series, and if they like it, recommend that they check out the remaining books in the series themselves. Reading out loud has also been very rewarding. I tend to do this with books that I think are really good, but that I know won't initially appeal to them. By the end, we all have a hard time putting the book down!
The biggest thing I have done to foster love of writing is to teach them to type. This separates the tediousness of handwriting from the creative process of writing. We used Typer Island for Kids, and then as they did their IEW writing assignments, I always encouraged them to "use two hands!" It didn't take long before they figured out it was way faster. My 15 yr old now types 70 WPM! Our favorite IEW book was All Things Fun and Fascinating. While geared for beginners, one son took it as a 5th grader and was known to type 11 page long creative writing stories!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

4monkeys

I use Brave Writer eBook to help with writing. It has been a novel approach that took my kids were they were and really helped them improve. We would do a weekly free write. At this point my kids love to share their writing both with me and each other. For reading my husband picks a book and reads to all of them every evening. When the whole family is working on through the same book it allows for great discussion.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

C,Mat'smom

My girls are older, 7th & 9th grades, so I read the same books they are reading so we can discuss them. It's fun when one of us gets to a good part before the others and we can playfully tease the others about how good what's next is. We also like to read books that are coming out as movies so that we can go watch the movie and compare it to the book. I encourage writing by each of us writing what we liked most about the book. It is neat to read each others and see how our answers are different. Also, we write about how different the book and movie is and which we thought was better.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mteach

Each of our kids has their own library card, so they usually have their own stacks of books checked out from the library. I also have my stack of books that I check out to read besides the books I check out to use in school. We use library books for history and science topics. Using living books develops the idea that books are not only for pleasure, but also for learning. One daughter now has a job as a substitute page at our local library, often coming home with books she discovered while reshelving books. We also limit the "tech time" at our house. Movies, computer games, and other such activities are limited, leaving many hours for reading. For our older children, this immersion in books has paved the way for a love of writing.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

hoppermom

I take my 3 girls to the library every week where they have developed relationships with the librarians. They often ask the librarians for book suggestions. They love to read! They don't write as much as they type. They seem to love everything about a computer, so letting them write on their laptops gives them incentive to create stories. Two out of 3 want to be writers as an occupation!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

cmac

My son, now in college, was not exactly a voracious fiction reader. I got him audio book versions with well-voiced characterizations, and his retention of the story was vastly improved. In addition, the younger kids liked listening along and picked up a lot funny expressions from characters with strong accents like those in David Copperfield - Uriah Heap rasping "We's 'umble people" comes to mind. They are actually looking forward to when they will have to read these books for high school.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

ctmayfield

We have always read aloud as a family - my children are now 9 and 10 and we are still reading aloud. I also work really hard to find rich books for them to read in their own time or to incorporate into a literature study. Living, rich, well written books have really helped foster that love of reading for us.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mmartin

We read a lot. But things that help make it interesting is changing your voice to different characters and scenes. Read with lots of expression. Give them time to absorb the pictures before you move on to the next page. Start reading chapter books as soon as their attention span allows- go in short bites. Have them narrate back to you what you have read, their favorite part, etc. When my middle child was young, she wasn't as interested in stories being read to her and I was worried she wouldn't like reading. She is now 4 and frequently brings me books to read. We have a shelf in the living room with children's books, and also one in their bedroom. I love to see them all 3 sitting on the floor together, with books in their hands! My husband and I are both avid readers, so maybe that increases their love of learning. =)

2 years ago · Like · Comment

dawgwife

We love to read together - history, bible, and evening stories. My husband has translated that now and has the kids read him things from time to time. I do have hesitant writers, so we use I.E.W. for our writing programs and it has helped a lot. I also watch for writing contests the kids may be interested in. The monetary motivation works if the subject is something they like. We also have focused on poem writing around holidays and that has sparked some creativity in them as well. To this day, though, I am always looking for what might spur them on more.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

cmac

When older children are assigned a specific book which they are balking about, I read the first chapter or two out loud, with lots of expression and explanations. This usually gets them past the exposition - often the most "boring" part of the book, into the action.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

j2juliano

My husband used to read to my expanding waistline as I was pregnant with each of our children. We read to our kids daily from the time they were babies. As they grew we would play rhyming games, have storytelling time (where the kids make up their own stories and act them out) and go to library storytimes. We enter reading programs during the summer and the kids earn prizes for their reading hours. We write weekly friendly letters to family and friends. The kids get very excited when they get a return letter in the mail.

2 years ago · Like · Comment

acrowder

We have read to our kids everyday and make sure that they see us reading as well. I've found that if I curl up on the couch with a good book my kids are apt to join me!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mamahkl

I bring home stacks of books from the library, from various genres, and leave them around the house. There are stacks on the coffee tables, on the table by the side door, on the night table in the girls' room. I don't say a word, so there's no reverse psychology going on. The girls pick up whatever strikes their fancy, and I catch them reading all the time!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

Muummy

We read and read some more. Then we mix who reads a sentence. We once had a summer time activity where we had a huge pile of books and we read outside on the blankets. It wasn't a food picnic, but a reading picnic!

2 years ago · Like · Comment

mama6

We read to our six children from the time they were babies. As they got older and showed an interest in various subjects or hobbies, I tried to find books on those topics to inspire them. Choosing high quality picture books and chapter books was a priority. For writing, I had them dictate stories to me before they were able to write fluently for themselves. After outings together we would brainstorm about what we saw, felt, heard, smelled, and tasted. Then we would think of a catchy way to start our story and see if we could add ideas from the 5 senses into our account. Sometimes we put these stories in a scrapbook with photos of the event. The children also started keeping their own journals where initially they would draw a picture and just write a caption or one sentence. Then if they wanted to say more, I would write for them. Looking back on these is a lot of fun.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

bmama4

We read together with the young ones. I read a lot to myself, so the kids can see it is one thing that can be enjoyed in life. I also make sure to talk about the books they may want to read and always offer to buy or get it from the library. We find magazine and newspaper articles that may be interesting to them on different subjects. We also go to bookstore and stay there for couple hours ---books everywhere to look and read and no other distractions.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

AnaMaree

We read daily and when a story really gets her attention we re-read it, she will create a mini-book for herself with her own drawn pictures, we act it out with the family members (German Shepherd has played Big Bad Wolf many times), she memorizes many of them and likes to "read" them to us and the dogs. Now she is imitating sounding out letters and gets very excited when she recognizes a word in a book or while driving. If the story is not interesting to her at all we will stop reading it and find one she likes.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Cransmile

When the kids were little, I would throw flash cards of letters, and plastic blow-up letters in a pile in the living room. They would run to get one, then run to me and shout "H !!--HAPPY!!" and such. When they could read, we'd do the same with piles of board books--run and get one, then read it out loud. We'd read every day, then at bedtime read again. The kids soon wanted to read me their bedtime stories. Nowadays, they are 9 and 5, and we go to the library each week. We take out piles of books that never last to the due date. A recent homeschooling international fair has put the research bug into both of them. We now add books on their chosen countries to our library piles, and they make reports and displays on them.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

momintrainingforlife

I want my sons to learn to love reading, so I talk about whatever I am reading that I think they will find interesting. I also do my best when reading aloud to them every day to bring enthusiasm for the subject matter or to add vocal inflections that keep things interesting.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

DebW

We try to make reading and writing fun for our kids. As we encounter current events and seasonal topics, we assign impromptu writing assignments that correlate. Also, since there are so many great books to read, we let our kids choose from a short grade appropriate list which book they will read next. Reading a book that is chosen by them is more appealing than a book that is "required".

3 years ago · Like · Comment

lassen

I read with my son daily. He reads to me and I then read to him. He's very busy, but he enjoys reading history and science together while he is climbing a tree or standing on his head. Lol! It just amazes me how can retell and remember later what I had just read to him. He will also either write or draw about what we have read. We enjoy that time together.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

bwright3

We read together every day! I am a former public school teacher and now a homeschooler so my book collection is a little bit extensive! We read together and I also created reading charts that allow my daughter (who has just begun reading on her own) to place a sticker each time she completes a book on her own! I have challenged her to read 100 books during spring! She is doing great so far and loves to read to herself, to other family members, anyone who will listen! As for writing she has a writing tub full of fun stationary, pens, stickers, stamps, etc. She is encouraged to write letters to friends or family members whenever she wants and we also have a writing journal where she writes and draws in weekly!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

6azsmiths

I take my kids to Goodwill and let them pick out any books they want. We come home and make a list if them to hang on the wall and as they read them, they mark them off. Something about a bought book (even if it inky cost .99), motivates them! The best thing I've seen motivate my kids to write is pen pal letter writing with their friends and family out of state.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

kfong

We've read and cuddled since they were little. We continue to build an extensive home library. I'm a bookaholic

3 years ago · Like · Comment

pallumus

We too read to our kids from the beginning. We also look for books about areas that interest them. Audio books are a new addition to our family, but have been a big hit with my youngest. Also, making time to read is important. With the overabundance of electronic devices available for kids today, we have to make a point of designating some time as "off" time - no electronics allowed. This gives my boys just the push they need to get reading.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

mykidsrock

We read together as a family often, but we also spend time at the library finding books that will excite our students. We play story telling games together and encourage the children to write down their stories.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Lizyram77

To foster a love of reading in our children, we started reading regularly at an early age, using age appropriate books with genres and topics that appeal to our kids. We also regularly let them pick stories, though we also pick stories. We read in an animated way. We have also allowed our children to choose books to look at/read at the breakfast & lunch table.

For writing, our vocal daughter loves to write about any topic. Our son, not so much. He is a perfectionist who upsets when he makes mistakes. So for him, we allow him to write about topics that interest him, and that he is confident about. We also offer "rewards" for positive attitude and effort (not accuracy) when they write. When they were younger, they dictated to me and I wrote for them, which they both enjoyed.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Vik

Yes, us too - audiobooks! My almost 6yo would listen to them all day every day if I let him. It's always me that needs a bit of a break in our tiny house. We also have at least 3 chapter books going at a time and bedtime means he gets to select which one he wants us to read together. We subscribe him to Click and Ladybug magazines too which he looks so forward to reading each month when they arrive and we do homeschool lessons around them.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

hypechick

Seem like all of you, we read aloud and do audio books everyday and sometimes almost all day. My kids (6 and *) have great reading comprehension and are starting to read independently. I also thank video games, comics and graphic novels for "teaching" my son (8) to read.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

AmyS

I have four sons, ages 20, 18, 10, and 7. Since my oldest was born, we have been reading aloud to all our boys - on lengthy car rides, before bed, and during the day as part of our school day. I can honestly say that all four boys have had varied interests, but once we discovered their interests, we used our library card and loaned as many books as they could consume that centered on the subject area of choice.

Additionally, with one exception, they have all loved playing games so I have always looked for games that required some level of reading proficiency. In cases where the reading level of the game exceeded the reading level of the son, we played in teams and assisted them.

Lastly, we have served as role models to our children. My husband and I are both avid readers and will frequently read in our spare time.

We've always told the kids, "Books are our friends." They've heard it so often that the 7yo will state that same thing to his young friends.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Angela

My son is now 11 and LOVES to read. I read alot to him since he was just a babe. I used Hooked On Phonics to teach reading as I continued to read aloud to him, and he often followed along. I also have had him read level appropriate books to himself and out loud as soon as he was able, and increasing the difficulty at his pace. One of our favorite authors for his read alouds is Thronton Burgess. He writes animal adventure stories that contain some good humor. When he first starting reading them out loud, they were part of his 'above level' books and we patiently went through them. Now, they are his 'below level' books. I find it good to have read alouds balanced between, below level for speed, on level for consistency and enjoyment, and above level for challenge and growth. This has worked well for us. We have made reading together fun, by selecting material that is of high interest, well-written, and worth our time....it makes reading fun and educational. One of our FAVORITE activities is reading. We read aloud to each other every day, as well as to ourselves. Building a special library for children at a young age has also been helpful. To have their own bookcase full of great material is exciting at any age!

For writing, when he was younger, he enjoyed dictating a real event to me. He would choose something fun that had happened recently, like a trip to grandparents, an awesome creature he found on a nature walk, etc... Then I had him copy it in his own writing. We started doing this very young as he was still working on forming his letters. We LOVE getty dubay italic, and at 11, he has great penmanship...a BOY too! :) Now, he continues to enjoy writing about events in nature in his nature study book where he also draws.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Sharon R.

Both of my boys (ages 11 & 8) love to listen to stories read-aloud - which is super for me since I love to read with them. We also really enjoy listening to audio books. Reading together is a wonderful way to be able to talk about the story and its characters as we go along. Their comprehension is much better this way.
My 11 year old loves to write his own stories, so I encourage that as much as possible. He has written many books of his own already, and has even taught himself to type so that he can better edit and save his literary works (and enable the rest of us to read them, since his handwriting is not very neat when he is traveling at the speed of his own imagination). My 8 year old doesn't enjoy writing (yet), so I keep him writing in small amounts every day to improve his skills, but don't push too hard to make him see it as a chore.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

BrendaSue

We read aloud everything and anything -- the kids have often acted out or reinacted the story with legos, action figures, etc. How many days have we just sat and read for hours and hours -- even into the teen years? Inside, outside, books and stories on CD/mp3. But I did learn that my picture learner boy read only for information up until age 11 and thereafter, if he has a picture (like from a movie) he will devour great adventure/fantasy books. If he doesn't have a picture in mind, he needs about 3-5 chapters to get hooked.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Bunnyslippers

My son is Dyslexic so reading is a struggle for him. My husband and I both love to read. From birth, we read him books every day and stories at night. He loved books up until he started reading in school. For a time, he hated books and reading. Then we discovered Reading Ally and their audio books. It turns out that he just felt left out since everyone else was busy reading their books. Now he has hundreds of books on his tablet. He loves books and this love carries him when he is struggling at school. Yes, he still reads at a 2nd grade level, but he has the most amazing vocabulary.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MrsRariden

My 7-year-old son is obsessed with Minecraft, it's all he talks about. He has learned to read and write a great deal of words from the game. I ask home to draw pictures and write explanations of them to help me understand all of the stuff he does on the game.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

mom22boys

Whenever possible we try to visit the places in our part of the country that we read about. At the end of 5th grade my son read "Lincoln's Last Days" the kids version of "Killing Lincoln" then while visiting family on the east coast we came back by Appomattox Courthouse and cemented it all in his mind. We have read Texas history in Mr Barrington's Magic Trunk books and visited the Alamo and places in Texian battles of independence from Mexico. If we have not read books about place we go he writes short stories about the things that struck him most. Often times these short stories or essays count toward BSA merit badges that he is working on. He has also give short talks to our co-op group as assignments. If you can't tell--we are a family who loves to read and visit historical places.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Astronomersky

I share reading with my children. I read and have them either read a few words on a page or they read with me as I read (Shadow reading). We also play reading games.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

lzimmer

We read out loud every night before bed. We read a passage from the Bible and then a chapter from a fiction book. My son is 15 and still likes to listen as I read out loud. It makes him anxious to read other stories when I do not have time to read aloud. We have read the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the Harry Potter series, the Chronicles of Narnia and many other classic stories. My daughter is 7 and loves to check out books from the library for me to read to her. I make her a deal. For every book she reads to me, I will read one to her.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

CaMama2011

We have been reading to our kids since they were babies! It's a natural occurrence at home and we visit the bookstore to browse and to take part in any activities (read- alouds, snacks, crafts). The kids naturally turned to reading in leisure and as family time (besides bedtime routine).

As for writing, that was slower to become exciting for my oldest lol. However, a storybook kit sparked interest! We started planning the story out with her, and she independently draws pictures and writes words or short sentence ideas for her storybook. (The kit has a blank book, what looks like extra scrapbook pages, and numerous stickers, ribbons, and gems.) The kit is more of a rewarding project than work, so I think it's been a great way to foster our kiddo's interest in writing.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

jamiej76

In the last 6 months my daughters love for reading has taken off. I read a lot and she likes to mimic me. We also went through many genres of books to find the ones that she is excited to read and cannot get enough of. Her Grandmother is fostering a love for writing with her by writing her letters often. She has also started a story for my daughter and her to work on together through their letters. I can also recommend the Kumon writing and reading workbooks. She absolutely loves them and is excelling with them.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MBryner

I have them read and write about topics they are interested in. I get stories ranging from princesses to marine biology.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

8redheads

I have always been an avid reader, we use a "living books" homeschooing approach, and I have thousands of books in our home, because I have a very small business selling living books to homeschooling families. Despite the more than ample exposure to books, not all of my kids have LOVED to read. One thing that has helped is for me to read a book myself and then to hand it off to a particular child with enthusiasm. Before I know it, the book has made its rounds through the house (at least among the older kids). Another thing is that my aunt sends a stack of books at the beginning of December each year. Each book is wrapped individually, and the kids take turns opening a book a night leading up to Christmas. They are much more likely to read these books for some reason!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

RedJen

We spend 1 day a week at the library. Even though they can both read, I read longer chapter books to them and we have discussions about what we are reading, about the characters, and of course make a running list of words we don't know and look them up at the end of each chapter.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Conerberal

We visit the library a LOT! I let them pick the titles. The independent reader has a dedicated reading time when he can read whatever he wants. The non-reader has his stories read aloud to him. Writing is not a fun thing for the elder boy, but sometimes he will put pencil to paper to caption a picture he has drawn. We keep those pages in a collection notebook to showcase his efforts. And of course I praise him for the effort.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

delaynemar5

My children love to read but writing has not always been easy for them. In each subject, I look for the one thing that excites the them. For example, in history my 2 middle schoolers love learning about the presidents and congress and how it all works together. This year, they have written and, in return, received several letters back from the White House regarding different topics ranging from past wars to current financial issues. It has been exciting for them and me

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Mom of 3

We take turns reading some of our favorite stories. We sit down with drawing pads and colored pencils and draw out images that come into our imaginations. They pay attention to the story and get very creative!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

sdevonh

We love books and reading in our home! Whenever our kids show and interest in a subject, we find materials at home or at the library to continue to grow their knowledge. Recently, we've been talking about authors, illustrators and the publishing process. They enjoy writing their own books in topics they love.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Lady2b

I have children with different reading abilities. I gather them at Barnes and Nobles, grab some goodies from Starbucks, head over to the books, get 2 or 3 books of interest, snuggle into our seating and read aloud(quietly). I put DVD's of the story on in the Van and bring the book for anyone who wants to follow along. Sometimes we act out the book. We change the plot or the ending to our liking. We make jokes about how it fits into our life style today. When the snow was so bad this year we had hot chocolate, fluffy pillows, our animals to snuggle and read from the Kindle on the floor, singing "Let It Snow."

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Soapy

As a lover of reading, I've always really wanted that for my children as well. To foster than, we read, read, read! I love sharing favorite books from my childhood with them. My kids are young, and they love rereading a favorite story. I can't tell you how many of our books fall apart from being so well read! I love that we are getting into the age of chapter books. I love hearing them beg for just one more chapter at night. We've also been listening to audio books in the car.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

life is good

I find that I don't have much time for reading on my own, to be an example, so this year we have picked three novel
that I read to the children all together. We can all share in discussions about the books. Next, if I have assigned
a book that is more challenging for my reader, I read the first 3 to 4 chapters with them. This gets them interested
in the book and then they seem to take off on their own. Lastly, for my little readers, I give them books that they
can definitely read and finish without extra help. This builds up their confidence when they get to the larger
books. Good luck.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

B5

Right now my oldest is in second grade and she loves to read. I've been getting chapter books from the library that we read together. She reads a couple of pages out loud and then it's my turn to read a couple of pages. We usually read a couple of chapters a day and then we discuss what we've read. It's our favorite time of the day!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

ENCHANTED

From birth reading is so important, andmade sure to read bedtime stories as well as at least once a day. as my kids grown oldertransitioned to them reading them selves in the day and me reading the bedtime stories. My kids still enjoy a bedtime story at age 11 to 13 like a few, chapeters in harry potter book.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

BruiserMommy

My husband and I take turns reading to them (different books) each night before bed.
We keep a stack of books in the vehicles for easy access during trips around town or farther out- and we rotate them out to keep them fresh.
We read as well- just for enjoyment, and often.
How do we know it's working?
4 people, 1 bathroom.... trust me, we're all readers here. :)

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Psalm

We usually find a book or series of books that they get engaged in. As they get hooked then we continue to feed
the desire to read more by giving similar books. If they are just getting started in reading we read some and then let them read. This way they have less frustration. We have had concerns at times whether they would develop the love to read. We have ten children and have had one get hook by reading "Captain underpants" another on the Chuck Black series. It sounds simple but it has worked with the older six. The rest are not old enough yet.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

KatieT

My 14 y.o. son is dyslexic so reading has always been a challenge for him. When he was in the 6th grade I was trying to encourage him to read by letting him borrow my Kindle. We discovered that reading became much less difficult on the kindle because we could enlarge the print and increase the spaces between the lines and words. For some reason this makes reading much less difficult. He has read all of the Percy Jackson books and Hunger Games books since we started doing this. Reading is still not his favorite, but he is much more willing to read now.
For writing and grammar we us IEW. He has always enjoyed writing his own stories, but found organizing reports difficult until we started using IEW. Writing is his favorite subject now.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

DrMom

I have a 2nd grader and 4th grader and we write all the time. I am happy to write stories as they tell them, and then we edit together; I provide plenty of writing materials for them to draw and write stories, poems, messages. We write letters to friends and relatives - we love picking up interesting postcards when we are out and about - just the thing for a quick message! We do lots of writing games: secret codes, haikus, limericks, along with games like boggle, scrabble, quiddler, rory story cubes. We read out loud every day. We read poems out loud to each other. We do Mad Libs and make up our own. We "pass" around stories, taking turns elaborating. We do word play. And yes, we do some "formal" stuff with Bravewriter and Sequential Spelling...but it is all in this context of fun and play and enjoyment.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

smokeybutter

I have found, in our almost 12 years of homeschooling, that reading excellent books that encourage deep thought, as well as entertain, draw our children in and encourage the love of a good book. My kids love books about real people, events, and places....books that teach a moral or lesson, and that have characters that exemplify good character qualities. When they are pulled into the events, emotions, or struggles of a character they yearn to read more. Often this translates over to the area of writing, as these stories inspire them to expound on what they have read or create alternate endings. Eventually they may create their own stories which are often influenced by the life experiences they have encountered in what they have read. Even if they don't write creatively, the stories they have read help to mold and shape who they are and how they think. Reading (or hearing read aloud) quality writing sets patterns in their brain for how to say what they mean and how to structure their writing. I have carefully chosen the books that we read; mostly staying away from modern writing as I find they have little to offer. Most of the books we read are from the 1800s, early 1900's, or have been written about someone who lived in those time periods or earlier. I don't think anything can take the place of the impact of quality literature.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

BonnieB

I let my kids choose books about people, places, and things that thy really are interested in so that they will finish the reading. For writing, I have them write to characters in the books, review of the books, travel ads for books, and other things that they get really excited.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Mickey

We have read morning and evening to our kids for worship. They still enjoy it so much even our 14 yr old. The boys love Audio books, as soon as we get in the car they want Oddesey Childrens stories. The love it.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

TXMomma

We read to our son all the time when he was younger. We still occasionally enjoy a book together, but he taught himself to read sometime before teaching reading was on my radar and he has been an avid reader ever since! He runs for a book every chance he gets and I always find 4-5 books laying around in the process of being reread. Writing is not as fun, but we are using a new writing program this year that has made it bearable as well as letter writing to his cousin, which may be more successful in a year or two when the cousin is old enough to write back! ;)

3 years ago · Like · Comment

okcmommy

Our kids send snail mail to their grandparents and other relatives. They love getting things in the mail, so we have also signed them up for numerous subscriptions.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Nevada

We read to our son, he sees us value reading as we do it so much in our free time as well. And we buy him tons of books. Owning them helps him know how much we value reading. But really, he has just adored books since he was a baby, and he has helped me to read more because he is always reading.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

HomeschoolMaof1

We've been reading to our son since his conception. We have always made it a priority to spend some part of our day with him, just reading aloud to him. Now at the age of 10, he still asks us to read to him. We've also purchased Reading Eggs for him and he loves doing that. We find books that he enjoys and we do listen to Audiobooks like Hank the Cow Dog when in the car. We encourage him to write stories about random items that we pick. He loves that, plus it helps us know what words he is struggling with in spelling. We use those words as his spelling words for the week.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Hartsdale

Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family! As soon as we are in the car, the boys ask me to turn the audiobook on!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

ShawSchool

We have really enjoyed the activity I call Authors Chair. My girls are always given the opportunity to share what they have be writing with their sisters and me. They'll read what they have written and then ask for complements or questions. The complements definitely boost self esteem ( we work on specific complements like "I like the way your character does...."). Questions can arise if the writing wasn't clear to the listener - which also helps in the editing process. From my experience, Authors Chair has furthered my kids desire to write more because they have an audience. After stories are written, we publish them by putting them in a binder of stories each has written. They enjoy looking back over what they've written in the past. They all seemed to love writing!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Maren

I have read to my two kiddos since they were born. My kids love to have stories read to them and now my oldest is able to read on his own!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

lynnpaulus

From little on I have endevored to make sure that I read aloud to the kids both Bible and great old books. We read books that were above their reading ability by far, but explained and answered their questions to the best of our ability. It is amazing how their vocabulary and understanding grows by leaps and bounds. Now they are reading Dickens and much prefer older books written before the 1900's. My youngest now 14 got a hold of a current book recently and couldn't believe how the writing lacked substance.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

lruppert

We love to listen to audio books in the car and at night. From the time they were wee ones, we have always treasured stories and they LOVE THEM!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

JOwens

My family loves to read books aloud together and discuss them. But we have discovered another fun way to read a book together. We each read the same book at the same time. As we do that, my kids and I share a reading response journal where one person writes his/her observations, questions, predictions, and comments about the chapter(s). Then they pass it on to another family member to read the entry and respond to the comments and then add more observations and questions. Then at the end of the book we have an amazing record of our written discussion!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Starla

We start our day off snuggling under the covers with a read aloud book and bible time. Then, we read a brief news article and discuss the writer's voice, or persuasive language. Finally, at the end of the day, it's quiet reading time for everyone, with some tea and a light snack. These routines make reading a writing a joy more than a chore!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

spunkymom

We love the library. Every week our son chooses new books for read aloud storytime and dicussion. He hasn't quite made the jump to reading on his own but we all cherish the time we spend together coxing up with a good book ( or three).

3 years ago · Like · Comment

MicheleinAZ

From a very young age we started reading to our children many times a day. They are now 9 and 11 years old and we still read to them every night. I will also read to them during the day. Sometimes I will read the first book in a series to get them excited and then they will ask to read the next books.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

acrowder

We have young children so we take the opportunity to read to them at many times throughout the day. We make trips to the library twice a week and make sure to include many different genres of books in our library picks and purchases for our home library. We also make sure that there is a comfy spot for them to plop down in front of the bookcases and read to themselves.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Therese8

I've always loved to read! Our curriculum is heavy reading aloud living books and having our children read quality literature. Limiting electronic time has also been important.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Luciernaga

I share a reading journal with each child where we write to one another our ideas and thoughts about the book we are reading. We also write to one another about topics that the kids may not be comfortable discussing in person. This fosters both the love of writing as well as learning to communicate our ideas about books we are reading and discuss uncomfortable topics.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

JM

We make a big deal out of finding "neat" books at the library and then reading them is special Daddy time.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Fyre

I read to my kids every night before bed. I try to make each character have a different voice, in for the younger kids I attempt to make the story into a song. I started reading to all of them around 6 months old.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Denali

We read together every night before bed. It took a while before he was interested but now he really enjoys it. Sometimes we take turns, sometimes only I read,

3 years ago · Like · Comment

cj2414me

I have been reading to my twins since they were tiny. I let them help choose books to read and also read books with them from favorite movies.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

SarahinWA

Besides reading to them each evening, I helped them "create" their own books. They wrote a story, which I formatted on the computer. Then, they colored pictures, which we scanned in and added. Now we're going to print them off for the grandparents of our budding writers!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

heidilynn34

I have my 6 year old write short stories for his little brother and play "teacher" for his 3 year old sister! She actually prefers him teaching her the alphabet & the letter sounds ... it's a win-win!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Cadz14

I love reading out loud to my children. I add voices, drama, funny facial expressions, and sometimes read while standing so I can "act scenes out" a bit. I have been doing that since my first born was in my belly. He is almost 12 now, and still loves it (just not in front of his friends)!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

BeckyG

Fostering the love of reading and writing started very early in our family--I'm guessing my daughter was under a year old. She was read to each day. It was something light and fun with lots of pictures that we discussed. As she grew and learned to read herself, I always let her choose books that she was interested in. She loves animals and has a vivid imagination. Now at 14, in addition to her heavy coursework reading and writing, she usually has an additional book or 2 at her fingertips that she is wanting to read or reread as well.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

loganmaya

We have a house filled with books. They are in every room and on a variety of subjects. We have been reading to our 3 children since before they were born. We visit the library weekly, and we always have a basket of library resources to add to our homeschool curriculum. We have 1 hour of reading time every day, sometimes assigned and sometimes "fun" books.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

JFlen

"Reading and writing skills begin at birth when baby is first exposed to language." ~Caroline Blakemore And that's how we do it. :) We talk, read, and write all the time. I write my shopping list in front of my girls. The one finds the letters, the other reads the items. Then, they naturally want to write their own lists. It all begins so simply with the letters on a page - it's literacy at our fingertips. We just look for simple everyday ways to make connections.
My husband and I also love reading to your girls. It's wonderful to hear the sense of inflection and expression as our oldest daughter now reads.
Our house is filled with books and writing journals, and both are used daily by each of us.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Beforethedawn

We encourage our children by having lots of books around the house, most that we get for $0.10 - $1.00 at the library. They love checking to see what books the library has for sale. We go to the library often. Both my husband and I are avid readers, seeing their parents read makes them want to read too. We read aloud often together. Every night before bed, our children have up to an hour of read-to-self time. When our kids were toddlers, I used foam bathtub letters to teach letters and that helped them want to learn to write. We provide lined notebooks and composition books and allow our children free writing time which they both love to do. I also enjoy giving them writing prompts and they love surprising me with the interesting stories they come up with!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Toni C.

We read every night together since they were born and at 10 and 12 we are still enjoying this. We talk about the story together and guess who done it for mysteries.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

sknzm

We encourage our children to read by letting them pick books on topics that they really enjoy. I found that if I picked regular "school type books" they would be less excited to read, so this has worked much better.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Chychychow

We have read to our children from young, and when they were older and had learned how to read, we left random books lying around and our children would read them. As a result, they are excellent writers today.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

hoopyscoopsmom

We encourage reading by reading stories together at dinner each taking a turn every night. We also go to the bookstore regularly and let the kids choose a book they are interested in. For my older daughter, we have instilled a love of writing, but first getting her to journal, even with just pictures when she was younger to tell a story of her day. Now as she is older, I will give her some words, like umbrella, purple, California and have write a short story using those words. I also give her characters , then she writes about them.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

LynneH

We encourage the love of reading and writing by reading aloud several days a week. I also require my 10 and 11 year olds to read a chapter book of their choice for at least 30 minutes a day. This has worked beautifully!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

JL63333

I have been reading to my son since he was born, and today he is a huge book lover! He likes to write (he's 5) his own stories. The words don't always get spelled correctly, but its his story!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Shellbelle

My kids are 12 boy and 8 girl and 1. Don't prefer to read and certainly not educational books and 2. Don't have an interest in reading the same book and 3. Insist they must read aloud because they prefer an audience for everything they do. So what I started doing was have them each choose a book that they want to read and I choose something of a biography of an important person in history then we sit together and each take a turn reading 5-6 pages at a time. The only rule is that we must be respectful and listen when it's someone else's turn to read. Sometimes thy will collaborate and one will act out scenes from the others story as it's being read. They love it, and it's time we spend together.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Gr8fulmumof8

When my son was 6, he still wasn't interested in books, but he loved football ( soccer). So I decided to bring home library books on football and read them to him. I also started his own personal library on football books, both fictional and non-fictional. He was so excited to read about his favorite football players that his interest in reading grew and grew. as he

3 years ago · Like · Comment

mp

Lead by being an example. When my son is choosing a library book, I am also. When it is reading time, I am reading too.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

sokogrow

I make sure that I take time to read at the same time for education or pleasure, they both respond well to me practicing what I preach.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Crazymom

We get our children to keep a reading log. For every 1,000 pages they read, they get to choose a family activity to do. It may be going to the zoo, the movies, or even just a drive to the mountains. They love getting to choose an activity for the whole family. They love the ownership of it. Plus I love the family time and that they are reading. It is a win for everyone

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Londonsje

My kids will create a special place, such as a tent their room, or work on a Legos project while we read inthat setting.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Darla

My children and I love to get cozy on the couch or or my big bed and read together. We choose our books together, too, which helps them to be more interested. We also give as much freedom as possible in writing so that they care about what they're writing!

3 years ago · Like · Comment

Laurel

I have buckets of books all over the place for my kids to read. I also have a writing station for each child.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

sjfurness

Although many feel that so called "twaddle" books sre not worthy of reading, I found that letting my son read his choice of books has made him a very good reader at only 8 years old. We make weekly visits to our local library for him to choose books as well as me choosing books required for school.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

hawleykj

The best way to encourage a love for reading is to READ! We read a lot. We read mysteries, novels, informational books, classics, new stories, magazines . everything we can get our hands on. We never have less than 60 books checked out from the library. A love for writing comes from having a purpose behind writing. Real-life, authentic writing experiences such as creating a business and then writing advertisements for it or pretending to be on the Oregon Trail and writing about the experiences.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

melrose

For writing, we have a container full of writing prompts. Some of them are just plain silly and others are thought provoking. They love to draw one out to see what they get to write about. It's great because I don't have to think of prompts as often. It's good for the kids because they are still young enough that they need guidance and ideas. They do free write occasionally too.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

melrose

I encourage them to read by letting them choose books they are interested in. I try to get them excited by asking them predictive questions. They also get to read wherever they want. They love to read outside. We do read aloud books as well. Also, we listen to books on cd in the car. I choose books that are above their level, but have a story they'd be interested in.

3 years ago · Like · Comment

adelenpaul

While I love the *idea* of reading out loud, I don't actually like to read out loud very much. Does that make me a bad homeschooling mom? :-) But we've solved this by listening to tons of books on tape as a family. It's one of our favorite things to do and has been a big piece of developing a real love of literature.

We also discuss and analyze quite a bit and I've modeled how to outline thoughts for either a speech or a paper. Once they have the outline and have already talked through it verbally, putting it down on paper is a natural next step.

When they were younger, we also organized a weekly writing group with 6 or 7 students. There was something about reading their work to their peers and not just handing it in to mom or dad that made a big impact. Plus they got to hear other student's writing and hear feedback from their peers. Our children are both older now (high school and college) and have won awards for their writing so it can be done!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

m448

Like others I read a ton aloud to the kids and I selfishly read the books that appealed to me as kid who loved to read. Amelia Bedelia and the Ramona books were hits. However, making reading a club you graduate into has been a boon around here. Nothing formal or stuffy, merely a wink, nudge and "hey kiddo you're now part of the reading club!" that was originally populated by momma and daddy, then big brother gives them a sense of accomplishment. After that, they get their own library card and are awarded generous leeway in their time for reading before bedtime. Once a kid has taken flight with a small bit of reading I go into overtime finding all any books that appeal to them even if it meant plumbing books from the reference section of the library or paying for obscure out of print books on firefighting and tornados. It's like fanning the flames to a fire.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Dynell ET

When I adopted my son at 2.5 years old, he was not talking at all. He did not have a diagnosed language disability. So, I first taught him songs and narrated our day to build his receptive language skills. I also invented a game called, "Tell me what you see" and everywhere we went, I told him what I saw and he did the same. When he started public school kindergarten, he loved story time, but by the beginning of 3rd grade, he hated reading and cried when he had to write even two sentences (that's when I started homeschooling him). To reverse the negative effects of his public school experience and re-associate reading with pleasure, we ONLY read while cuddling on the couch or in his fort. He has an extensive library of books at home, so he had permission to read any book he wanted and some days during homeschool we ONLY read fun books, went for walks, ate snacks, read some more, and sang songs. He has been able to tolerate reading lessons in small doses and now at the end of third grade, he is reading at a fourth grade level and asks to visit the library to get more books.

His writing was terrible with many spelling errors. In second grade his papers were filled with red marks noting his many errors. In homeschool, I marked all of the "good stuff" in red (it's his favorite color), and at end of the page, listed up to four things that need to be corrected in pencil. I also taught writing in very small chunks and to my delight, he asked for a writing assignment the other day. I am delighted and hope these comments help others.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Jennyk

In our home we have "reading time" that our children participate in as soon as they can hold a picture book and flip pages. Everyday, for between 20-30 min, we all find a quiet spot in the family room-- couch, favorite chair, or blanket on the floor, and we read quietly until the timer goes off. Everyone except the toddlers get to pick their own books. Only rules are, you have to be quiet and stay in your spot:) Everyone loves this designated time, even the little ones who just have picture books; they all come running to start the activity. I think this activity helps develop a love for reading. Most days, after the timer rings, the older ones who are actually reading beg to have more time. I love it!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

SimpleMom

Like many of the other posters, we have read to our children from the beginning. I continue to read to my children - those interesting books that are just out of their range, but they also have to read to me now. We have an extensive home library and we frequent the public library which gives the kids so many books to read. While they have assigned reading, they spend lots of time reading the books of their own choosing. One of our favorite reading activities is where we really enjoy passing books around where we each get a turn reading.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

lavendar4

Besides reading aloud to our children, even before they were born, we also have made available to them many, many books. We do take them to the library every week or so, but we also own hundreds of books. We did not spend a fortune to do this but rather frequented the local thrift stores and yard sales. When they were babies, we made the books available to them on the floor, and later in baskets and on shelves. Until very recently, we only took bags of books and a few toys on long car rides, instead of dvds or video games.

Writing is harder for us, but I think I'm doing better with the younger one. With her, when she writes I am focusing on the creativity of it and on being an encouragement instead of correcting mistakes. I am trying to approach this with the same attitude as I did the reading: allow them to develop a love for it first.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

LisaKni

We model a love of reading to our children, read to them, and take them to the library ALOT! (They ask to go all the time). We also choose curriculum that is literature rich, and often times they get books as gifts for holidays. I guess you could say we use an "immersion" approach in our home. Our entire family is immersed with good literature - and there are books everywhere! And now we are blessed with children who "inhale" books!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

3000melanies

The love of reading was achieved by letting my daughter choose her own books to read until she found a series and genre that really made her happy. Once she read her first book that she couldn't put down she was hooked . With writing , once she developed a character she liked, she wrote about him in installments. She will now continue his story in free time and even asked for an animation program so that she animate his tales.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Scrimp & Saver

My children are 5, 6, and 7 this month. Since they've been 6 months old, I have read to them. I still read to them a lot every day. In the past year for our homeschooling, I have purchased some excellent books that I save in my closet for prizes. We keep a marble jar for each child. As we review concepts that we've been learning this year, especially in history and science, I give them marbles for each correct answer they remember. When they fill up their marble jar, they receive a NEW BOOK for a reward. For them, receiving a reward is so exciting, and I feel like a book isn't a spoiling sort of prize. The fact that the books ARE the rewards is communicating that there's something special about books and reading. Another method of instilling a love for reading is reading chapter books to them. This past year, I have selected some excellently written books that keep them eager for the next chapter and for the next time we read. This summer, I will have my eldest enjoy a reward system for his own reading now that he's beginning to flourish as a reader and can enjoy that activity independently.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

nmhewitt

We do LOTS of reading in our home. The biggest thing that I do to encourage the kids to read is to read their books along with them! We don't usually read them out loud, but instead take turns with the book so that we can discuss what we're reading. This really motivates them to keep reading.

As for writing, I have the kids write journal entries every day and I give them a few topic choices so that they feel like they get to write about something they chose. Or sometimes I just let them pick the topic themselves. I read somewhere that one of the best ways to encourage writing is just to have your child write every day in a "free form" style - meaning they don't have to worry about grammar or spelling when they work on their journals. (I do sometimes help correct a few things afterward, but we don't stress mechanics when we do journals).

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Influence4Christ

Our elementary aged children are part of Pizza Hut and local libraries book reading clubs where they are rewarded with snacks, free admission tickets to Six Flags New England and the Annual Topsfield Fair, MA.

Our daughter has enquired about and has started a journal in which she makes daily entries. Before this, I would read stories to them during the day and Bible Stories at bedtime.

We also do weekly library visits where they pick out their own books on their own cards, since they are old enough now to get their cards. They love to read, and often will read even without rewards! :)

4 years ago · Like · Comment

taejmom

To encourage my children to start reading independently, we designate a special shelf in our living room for the brand-new-reader's books.

Each new first-grader gets the bottom shelf of our book case (bumping the previous owner to a higher shelf). I fill the shelf with easy readers that have been mastered, as well as attractive books and magazines at the child's reading level.

Having a special place for those first easy-reader books makes it easy for the child to grab a book and feel confident that s/he can read it alone or show off for Daddy or Grandma!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

murphyjulianne

Recently I was given a priceless gift; a 35 year old tape recording, of my grandmother reading me a story, was restored and put on CD. My son was with me when I picked it up and played it for the first time. Tears of joy and some sadness, as she is no longer with us, streamed down my face. Listening to the recording my son said, " Grandma King had a wonderful talent for reading aloud. I understand why you've said she is the reason you love to read. You know mom, she passed down that gift to you and now your passing it to me." In that moment I felt such gratitude to the woman who had given the joy and love of books to many generations to come in our family!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

SDJeannieZ3

I read to my kids when we snuggle down for naps together. I start chapter books early and I just keep reading and reading until they fall asleep.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

SDJeannieZ3

I read to my kids when we snuggle down for naps together. I start chapter books early and I just keep reading and reading until they fall asleep.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

bovier01

I read to my son when I was pregnant with him and when he was a baby. When he got old enough to read I got him his own library card and I found him reading websites on the computer and we read everyday-him to me and me to him. I also purchase him books to read at home as well as printing exercises off of the computer for him to read. I also sign him up for summer reading programs at the church and the library.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

MHoward

I apologize for the large block of text below - it had paragraphs. I am trying again.

Like many here. I started reading to my girls when they were infants. I would read to them for hours at a time if they were interested. I always read before I fed them at bedtime and I got so that I could read the bedtime books with my eyes closed if I were tired enough. I could even turn the pages at the right place with my eyes closed.

We started them on audio books when my oldest was two (when I was pregnant with my youngest - so in reality my youngest has always had audio books). We started with "The Complete Tales of Beatrix Potter" by Tantor Media and moved from there. Our early favorites include Harper Children's Audios "Winnie the Pooh" and the "House at Pooh Corner" both narrated by Jim Broadbent and the "Little House on the Prairie Series" narrated by Cherry Jones. I am sure I will be disappointed if I get to heaven and find that Laura doesn't sound just like Cherry Jones.

When they were tiny, I kept a journal for them. They would tell me about their and I would write it down for them.

My children love to be read to but it wasn't until sometime between the ages of 8 and 9 that either of them really fell in love with reading for themselves. Learning to read was hard for them and they preferred to listen to Mom or an audio book rather than taking the time to do it themselves. So don't get discouraged if they take longer to catch on to reading than you had anticipated!!

My oldest is a gifted writer and wants to be a writer when she grows up but my youngest still struggles with handwriting and so doesn't care to write unless someone is willing to take dictation.

We've always had vast quantities of books located all over the house. My girls take it as a personal affront when I cull the piles and prepare to take some back to the thrift store because I don't want them taking up space. By the way, thrift stores can be a book goldmine.

We also take advantage of the library. I control our one card because I can check out sixty books at a time and renew them up to three weeks and so it gets to hard for me to keep track of everything if we have multiple cards and we already pay overdue fines regularly.

Some useful and fun tools or ideas for us include the following:

Tales2Go: We joined Tales2Go through the CoOp. I find none of the material on Tales2Go objectionable and my girls love the freedom to pick and choose and listen when they like.

Jim Weiss/Greathall Productions: My girls love him as a narrator. We listen to his narration of "Story of the World" for Peace Hill Press repeatedly. The girls have a strong knowledge of the arc of world history as a result of that excellent production.

We also really enjoy Weiss's narration of G.A. Henty books. My oldest has developed a love for strategy from listening to the battles in the books (which frankly, put me to sleep).

WriteHomeStudio http://www.writehomestudio.com/: My eldest child is a gifted writer. I've set her up for creative writing lessons with WriteHomeStudio, which works something like a mentorship. She works with Jonathan Friesen on a novel. He has a tremendous ability to bring out the best in her and encourage her.

Shurley English: If you have a legalistic child or a child who really likes rules and formulas like my eldest, the Shurley English program's writing component is awesome. My oldest loves to write 3 and 5 point arguments and persuasive essays after learning how to do them in the Shurley program. She will write them just for fun. Her writing is more cogent than many adults.

Friends: We started a writing group with some of their home school friends. We call our group "Poetry and Play" and we've been meeting for two years and the children are always excited. Last year we focused on writing poetry.

The first half of this year we studied Shakespeare and culminated with an abbreviated production of "Romeo and Juliet" put on by the children. They also presented memorized soliloquy or sonnets at the production. They loved Shakespeare and they really own him now.

This half of the school year has been focused on writing and reading share times. The kids share what they've been reading and writing. We are currently working on a round robin story. They are always excited to read each others work and find out what everyone has been reading and they are always borrowing each others books or writing down titles and names to take to the library.

Next year's big production is in the planning stages. We are planning to film a production of a play based on one of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

4 years ago · Like · Comment
MHoward: I guess it doesn't like my paragraphs. I am sorry!
4 years ago · Like

MHoward

Like many here. I started reading to my girls when they were infants. I would read to them for hours at a time if they were interested. I always read before I fed them at bedtime and I got so that I could read the bedtime books with my eyes closed if I were tired enough. I could even turn the pages at the right place with my eyes closed.

We started them on audio books when my oldest was two (when I was pregnant with my youngest - so in reality my youngest has always had audio books). We started with "The Complete Tales of Beatrix Potter" by Tantor Media and moved from there. Our early favorites include Harper Children's Audios "Winnie the Pooh" and the "House at Pooh Corner" both narrated by Jim Broadbent and the "Little House on the Prairie Series" narrated by Cherry Jones. I am sure I will be disappointed if I get to heaven and find that Laura doesn't sound just like Cherry Jones.

When they were tiny, I kept a journal for them. They would tell me about their and I would write it down for them.

My children love to be read to but it wasn't until sometime between the ages of 8 and 9 that either of them really fell in love with reading for themselves. Learning to read was hard for them and they preferred to listen to Mom or an audio book rather than taking the time to do it themselves.

My oldest is a gifted writer and wants to be a writer when she grows up but my youngest still struggles with handwriting and so doesn't care to write unless someone is willing to take dictation.

We've always had vast quantities of books located all over the house. My girls take it as a personal affront when I cull the piles and prepare to take some back to the thrift store because I don't want them taking up space. By the way, thrift stores can be a book goldmine.

We also take advantage of the library. I control our one card because I can check out sixty books at a time and renew them up to three weeks and so it gets to hard for me to keep track of everything if we have multiple cards and we already pay overdue fines regularly.

Some useful and fun tools or ideas for us include the following:

Tales2Go: We joined Tales2Go through the CoOp. I find none of the material on Tales2Go objectionable and my girls love the freedom to pick and choose and listen when they like.

Jim Weiss/Greathall Productions: My girls love him as a narrator. We listen to his narration of "Story of the World" for Peace Hill Press repeatedly. The girls have a strong knowledge of the arc of world history as a result of that excellent production.

We also really enjoy Weiss's narration of G.A. Henty books. My oldest has developed a love for strategy from listening to the battles in the books (which frankly, put me to sleep).

WriteHomeStudio http://www.writehomestudio.com/: My eldest child is a gifted writer. I've set her up for creative writing lessons with WriteHomeStudio, which works something like a mentorship. She works with Jonathan Friesen on a novel. He has a tremendous ability to bring out the best in her and encourage her.

Shurley English: If you have a legalistic child or a child who really likes rules and formulas like my eldest, the Shurley English program's writing component is awesome. My oldest loves to write 3 and 5 point arguments and persuasive essays after learning how to do them in the Shurley program. She will write them just for fun. Her writing is more cogent than many adults.

Friends: We started a writing group with some of their home school friends. We call our group "Poetry and Play" and we've been meeting for two years and the children are always excited. Last year we focused on writing poetry.

The first half of this year we studied Shakespeare and culminated with an abbreviated production of "Romeo and Juliet" put on by the children. They also presented memorized soliloquy or sonnets at the production. They loved Shakespeare and they really own him now.

This half of the school year has been focused on writing and reading share times. The kids share what they've been reading and writing. We are currently working on a round robin story. They are always excited to read each others work and find out what everyone has been reading and they are always borrowing each others books or writing down titles and names to take to the library.

Next year's big production is in the planning stages. We are planning to film a production of a play based on one of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

mousebouncer

We had a "Cuddle Corner" which had tons of books, pillows, stuffed animals, and light. We would snuggle in when our daughter was young and read everyday together. As she could read herself, dad built an indoor treehouse of sorts and Cuddle Corner was the raised platform with books, light, pillows, etc. Now that she is a teenager we have a reading cuddle corner in her bedroom with a chair she picked out, books piled on the floor, light, and pillows. We LOVE CUDDLE CORNER.

We also have always read to her at night. Both parents when possible. Even know as a teenager we read together out loud at night. She always gets to pick the books.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

shj

I wrote paragraphs in my comment below but they disappeared when I posted. In a nutshell, I have my kids
start writing a journal of their life when they are small -- they nearly always can think of something to write
about. (Littles draw a picture of what they told me to write down, and older kids trace or write their own words).

My kids love having the events of their life written down. Their spelling words come from misspelled words
in their journals. I teach them grammar concepts as I see a need in their journals.

I use the series Five in a Row to teach Language Arts, Social Studies, Art, Math, and Science concepts
based on great children's literature. My kids love this.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

shj

I read board books to my babies and toddlers every day, and read a stack of books to the kids
while they are eating breakfast.

I use the "Five in a Row" series to teach language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies concepts to
preschool and grade school kids based on wonderful kids books. When we read the "Story of Ping" we
learned about China, how to draw concentric circles to represent movement in water, how repetition is used in
the story, how the lost duck felt, and we talked about how the people in the story live on the water in boats .
the kids love the books and the activities.

Staring when my kids are about three or four, I have them start writing their own journal (of their life). I'll
ask a three year old what he wants me to write down about the day before, or any recent event. Then I will
have him draw a picture about it. As he progresses in writing, I'll have him trace a few words or a sentence
and then draw a picture, eventually transitioning to him writing a few words to a sentence. My five-year old
can write one or two sentences on her own, and I will write down more if she wants. The older kids' spelling
words come from misspelled words in their journals. My kids love having a record of their life! I have the
pages bound at the copy store every year. Here is a link about how to use journals for Language Arts
http://www.lovetolearn.net/catalog/category/detail/Language_Arts_-_Composition/6 .

4 years ago · Like · Comment

crossermom

Write something...My eleven year old daughter HATES to read!! This is in part to her battles with ADHD, but also due to being forced to read materials in public school that she could not relate to. While I understand that she has to have the skills and ability to pick up any book and understand it; she has yet to develop the love of reading that makes that possible.
We are now homeschooling our daughter and are trying to take two steps back in her reading program. I am determined to make it fun for her! We sat down and made an interest inventory, and then went and sought material that catered to her likes. We take turns popcorn reading her selections which helps to keep her engaged. While she may be a tweenager, she still craves that one on one mom time that she wasn t getting while in public school. Our grammar lessons are coming (in part) to our fun Fridays approach. I collected a pool of girls around the age of my daughter (through friends and family across the world), and once a week we write letters to our new friends. We talk about things such as how to express and convey our emotions and thoughts, how to write in a manner that is appropriate for our intended audience, how to expand our word choices and sentence structure, and of course proper spelling and punctuation. The cool part is that she has no idea she s learning!! She loves Fridays, and the look on her face when we come to the table and discuss our upcoming day is reward enough!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Girl4God

We do Creative Writing exercises as well as going to the library all the time. We try and participate in the Library programs. Our CoOp sometimes does a writing program too which my daughter loves.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

happylhomemaker

We read to our kids in the womb. We have more books than toys laying around. We have no problem replacing board books due to curious hands. WE read all the time. We read to them all the time (sometimes whether they are paying attention or not. And books are often the diversion of choice. Until they get older, then it's chores :).

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Franklinhq

Teaching writing has been a struggle. We have used copy work of great models and while that builds skills it does'nt help confidence. My best tip is to start early with creative writing and in the early years give very limited critic. Perhaps just work on capitalization and punctuation while building confidence in the creating part.

As for reading, book baskets everywhere--kitchen table, bathroom, den, bedroom--encourage reading because a book is always easy to grab. It is the same reason people keep fruit on the kitchen counter so it will be easy to grab :-)

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Franklinhq

Teaching writing has been a struggle. We have used copy work of great models and while that builds skills it does'nt help confidence. My best tip is to start early with creative writing and in the early years give very limited critic. Perhaps just work on capitalization and punctuation while building confidence in the creating part.

As for reading, book baskets everywhere--kitchen table, bathroom, den, bedroom--encourage reading because a book is always easy to grab. It is the same reason people keep fruit on the kitchen counter so it will be easy to grab :-)

4 years ago · Like · Comment

JessicaW

When our son began reading, he didn't enjoy it at all. To him, reading was boring and took too long. This came as a huge surprise (and hurdle) as my husband and I enjoy reading as well as our three daughters. What was I to do? How do you spark an interest for reading in a child that has none? We tried books with boy characters, books about boys activities...still, he just didn't seem to be moved. Then, one day, I had an idea. He really enjoyed the Narnia movies...and someone had given him the original movie set for Christmas. If you have watched the older versions and the newer, you know there are many differences. My son seemed very interested in noting these differences. So, I asked him, "What if there are differences in the books?" (with a very interested and excited voice!). He was equally curious! So, we began reading the series together, writing down the differences in characters, plots, story lines. Then, at the end of each book, I had him write a few sentences of "What would you change if you wrote the next "version"?" He eagerly devoured the rest of the series on his own. We moved to Little House on the Prairie (we are able to check out the series on DVD at our public library), watching the show, reading the books, noting changes. This has really opened up the dialog on writing, on character, plot, etc.
He has moved on to find a genre that he enjoys; Mystery. He is eight and easily reads two to three chapters a day of The Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew. There aren't movies to go with these, however, his love for reading has blossomed...and writing isn't as daunting of a task as it use to be either!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Joiy03

This seems like a simple thing, but we visit the public library often. I could never support my own book habit without the library. I keep a very large (too large for my husband:) stack of library books, so there is always something for my 11 year old to read. I also encourage taking books out in the car on errands, or anywhere we go that my son might be bored. Getting a child hooked on any kind of series book is also beneficial. As for writing, we take any kind of story ideas very seriously, so we write them down, or sometimes I will type as he dictates. We often "hash" over story ideas while completing mundane tasks, such as washing and drying dishes.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

hspanda

We have had a variety of reading materials available since she was little. A variety of age appropriate magazines and books. Bookshelves or magazine racks in most rooms including the bathrooms.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

K

Our kids have and have always had books. When they were babies and toddlers instead of giving them a toy to play with when we would go out I would had them a picture book. I read to them every chance we get. As soon as they showed an interest I started teaching them letters, letter sounds etc. when family members would ask what to get them for Christmas or Birthdays I would generally suggested an educational but fun toy. Leapfrog and VTech offer several options for young children. Starting at age 5 with both of my kids we used Phonics Pathways and at age 7 I started Shurley English for Grammar. I also supplement this curriculum with a couple of online resources some of the subscriptions I have purchased using this co op.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

cruzingwithk9s

We have been reading to our daughter since she was a baby. We have library cards to the surrounding libraries in our area and our daughter is only 4. We buy books for treats at the grocery store instead of candy or toys. She loves this and always says no thank you if it is not one she wants. We have books shelves all over the place and we pass our books on when she outgrows them. She is now reading to her dollies and build a bear friends.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

crazydaisytrue

As simple as it seems, I purchased booklights (set of four on Amazon for $12 w/free ship) for my girls. Now they clammor to get ready for bed so they aren't using up their time (and beg for more time when I tell them lights out)! The ones that can't yet read independantly look through books and make up their own versions. I have notice them reading books that they would never have attempted previously & their ability levels have much improved!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

MommaBee

Like so many others here, we have always made books a priority in our home. We invest in them, use them, and treasure them. Most of our books (many bookcases full) have been read countless times. I don't discourage re-reading of good material as it impresses upon the reader good writing style and further cements vocabulary. In addition, it brings me joy to see books so well read and to see the pleasure that reading well loved stories brings my children. They read so much, however, that there are always new books on my shopping list and books are always at the top of their "wish lists" (much to my delight and others' surprise!).

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Planted4Him

Reading is a subject that is difficult for my children. Not because they struggle with reading; in actuality it is because they dislike it so much. I am an avid reader and they loved it when we would read together when they were young. So I am a bit befuddled as to why reading is such a chore. Getting them to pick up a book and read is worse than finding a needle in a haystack!
I have found a temporary solution that seems to work: Finding classical books that were produced into a movie. The reading assignment is to read the book, do the necessary work relating to the book, and then as a reward we watch the movie once the book/assignment is complete.
The kids are actually picking up their books without reminders!
What a breath of relief! My job: Finding books that have had movies composed. Not an easy job either. Finding books on levels they can comprehend and that are not below their reading levels is quite challenging. But, I research with a new bounce in my step as I am seeing a new chapter in my kids reading enjoyment. :)

4 years ago · Like · Comment

KendraH

Reading has never been an issue as my 11yr old has always loved books. Though maybe it is because we have always supplied her with such a huge collection of books from day one. Any series she likes we look to buy as much as we can. Examples would be Animal Ark, The Magic Tree House, Pony Pals. Now she is in to Kingdom Keepers, American Girl, Canterwood Crest, So we look on ebay to buy large mixed lots of the books she is in to at the time. When she was younger we would have friends come over and we would read a Magic Tree House book aloud and have themed activities and foods to where ever Jack and Annie had visited, and the time period they visited. Now we have a wonderful friend that invites us to her house to do the same for American Girls. Writing has been a little bit harder for us, as she was traumatized by a preK assistant that made fun of her writing. (a major reason we now homeschool) She is just finally now getting more enjoyment out of writing and I let her lead when it comes to writing.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Marlene

My children 5 and 7 love to color and draw, so I have them make up mini booklets and then we right up a story sentence to go with each picture in their very own designed book. Mom publishes it with her stamp of approval and another novel is written.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

MamaBear3

We read aloud a lot and now that we are moving into chapter books I try to leave off right before something really exciting happens. We have great discussions about what might happen next and it always leaves them wanting more. The next day they are waiting on the couch, book in lap, and so eager to keep reading. We encourage the kids to read by keeping it fun. We put chocolate chips at the end of a page or a sentence as a reward, we participate in read-a-thons, we will read a story and then act out a scene. It's really helped the kids foster a love of reading and they are excited to read now and show off their "skills"!!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

momw/4bz

Like so many others have said, we have all kinds of books all over the house, and we read, read, read to our children. We also visit the library often. When our oldest was 5 I read the whole Chronicles of Narnia series to him. He loved it! I tried it with our second son when he was quite a bit older and he still wasn't into it like our first son. For him I had to let go of the idea of only offering "good books" (you know ,"no twaddle"). He is a visual learner and dyslexic. He loved Garfield and other comic books so, even though it was hard for me, I let him read those until his hearts delight. Now he reads often and doesn't need the pictures. (Sonlight books helped with this.)
We also listen to audio books often, especially in the car. There are so many great audio books available, even at our small town library.
I also read a lot myself. Right now I am reading books from the library to prepare for our study of American history next year. When I find something interesting I always share it with my children so that they see that even as adults we can learn so much from reading and enjoy it.
The book Honey for a Child's Heart is a great resource for finding excellent books. Also, we used Headsprout Early Reading and Headsprout comprehension (now Mimio). These are expensive but well worth it in my opinion, especially if you have a child who struggles with reading.
For my youngest readers (I currently have a 3 year old) I play a game we call lids. I used fabric paints to write lower case letters on can lids (cut with a can opener that makes a blunt rim). Then when my son says the right sounds for the letter he gets to keep the lid. I have played this game with all my boys when they were 3 or 4 and they love it. We do chants like "b-b-bat and a ball" or "o-o Ozzie" so that each letter is like a character. Now my little guy gets so excited when he sees letters and he shouts out the sounds. He is even trying to blend the sounds into words and can hardly wait to read!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Carrie in NC

We always have books around! I have quite a collection of everything from board books to Classic literature, how-to fun science books, history, high school and college textbooks (mostly my DH's old books), and much more. We *HAD* to buy a bookcase for the living room to hold all the books we are currently using for history, including the huge load we borrow from the public library each week. The five selves filled up in less than one month!

Also, I use Five in a Row starting with my (then) two-year-old. Now, at age four, he often "reads" the books to me. It's fun discussing the language (rhyming, repetition, etc.), art, geography, and other aspects.

Although we go to the library together as a family, the older boys each have their own library card to check out books that they'd like to read in their free time.

I wait on formal writing until their vocabulary and understanding of structure is more solid, around 4th grade. Before then, they are free to write their own stories or do copy work of their choosing. They come up with some amazing tales! I learned a lot about each child's interests by reading their free writing!

The various summer reading programs are a great time for us to record and see just how many books, pages, hours we each read! And, it reinforces my encouragement to the older boys to read to their youngest brother. One of my favorite pictures is the three youngest crowded around a book on the couch. Precious!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Cbrnwl

Read aloud, often. Model the behavior I want to see. I let my child choose what to write about, daily.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

ReadAloud

It began when our son was a baby. We would read aloud to him for at least 30 minutes before bedtime or nap time. By the age of seven months, he preferred reading to eating and would stop nursing to sit up and look for a book. By three and a half years old, he could read as we learned on vacation when he read aloud the road signs! To foster writing, I would let him dictate stories to me. I would write the story, and he would illustrate, sometimes with rubber stamps, or drawings, or cutting out paper shapes. He's now in 8th grade and has taken the SAT twice and scored very well.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

KT

To encourage reading for the young reluctant reader,I offered 15 minutes of computer time for every 15 minutes of reading. Our son began to read more so that he could spend more time on the computer (however, the limit was 45 minutes/day and this was his only "screen time"). Pretty soon he was reading without any reward just because he loved it.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Twiz

I let them choose their own reading material for Reading class. (within reason) I just bought 'Imagination station' series for my son. I also get them audio books if they aren't into it to help their interest.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

wolfcrazy

we always have books around. We have been going to the public libraries for years and have developed strong friendships with the librarians. My kids love going just to talk to them, not just check-out books. My kids' father and I are always reading whether it is books from the library or our own books. The kids have always seen us do this and do it themselves. We encourage them to use their imaginations, which has in turn encouraged them to write their own books.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Russ "Father of Alex"

Our Son enjoys a free reading time each day. He reads what he wants and chooses and is not corrected (much) when he reads. He has a book placed into his hands often in the car and sees his parents reading everyday. He listens to how books open worlds the author creates for his/her readers and how we can travel and experience anything we can imagine through the authors mind/book. We limit cartoons to a half hour or forty-five minutes in the morning and little if any in the evening. If anything begins to compete for reading time...I cut it!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

chepul

Whenever my daughter expresses an interest in a topic, or poses a "I wonder why or how" question, I try to quickly get to the library with her and pick out a bunch of books on the topic. If she is really fascinated by it, I suggest she create a Power Point presentation. She loves to use this format and writes much more than if I asked her to 'write a paper'. The spell check and grammar check feature,which shows up her errors in red, drives her nuts, so she is very motivated to correct her spelling and grammar in order to make them 'go away'.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Rachel

I have always read to my children before bed since they were born. It is part of our bedtime ritual. Now, my oldest child who is 10, gets to read independently before bed and chose her own time to turn off the lights. She even shares in reading to the younger kids.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

casey00

All 3 of my children love to listen to books. When they were young (2-3), I recorded myself reading their favorite books with them. I had them say "turn the page" when we came to the end of a page. I would play the recordings for them as they fell asleep. They used these mp3 recordings as they got older and started reading books on their own. They love listening to theses recordings now and hearing their "very young" voices.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

melissakipe

This may sound simple but read,read, read, and then read some more!
Be an example of reading yourself. And I think its really imprtant to get good magazines in the mail and to give books as gifts. We often give books for Valentines Day. While none of my children have been early readers, they LOVE books and progress fast when they finally get it

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Violin Mom

We have had family read-aloud time in the evening since our children were infant and three years of age. Over the years, I have read many, many good classic books to our family, and although we don't have as much time to do this as we used to (our children are 10 and 13 now) I still read to them when all four of us are riding in the car, me in the passenger's seat. I make it a practice never to read aloud when I am the driver! I have always focused on books with broad vocabulary and complex sentence structure - books like the entire Chronicles of Narnia series and Lord of the Rings series; also several exciting read aloud books recommended in the Sonlight catalog. I think this has had the single biggest influence on my children's present reading skill level. On my daughter's first birthday, we followed a traditional Korean custom of placing several items on a tray in front of her and whichever item she picked up, would be her vocation in life. So she picked up the pen - a sure sign that she will be a writer. She has lived up to it - she writes at every opportunity! My son is not quite the fan of writing as his sister is, though. For writing, we have focused on journaling, writing out one's opinions on paper, and now, my daughter writes summaries of some of the books she reads, as well as her own opinions about what the story characters do. I find that giving the children opportunities to write out their opinions is a big motivator, especially for our son, who has strong opinions on just about everything.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Mommymax

My house is full of book lovers, so getting them to read has never been a real problem. That being said, to make reading even more fun and rewarding I register my homeschool for every reading incentive program I can find. If its available to public schools, it is almost always available to homeschoolers. Every year we take part in Pizza Huts Book It program, Six Flags Read to Succeed, and local incentives that get us tickets to Hawks, Falcons, and Braves games. We also take parts in programs for individuals that get them free books from Barnes and Noble and Kumon. We also take part in the summer reading program at two local libraries. Every summer we try to beat our previous year's record of books read, and our record is SHOCKINGLY high! Last summer we read right at 350 books!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

homeschooldoc

My kids were either lucky or cursed. Books and magazines are piled high all over the house and when given the option. someone in the house is reading. My younger son actually told us when he was two that he thought he belonged in a different family because he did not read as much as we all did (including his older brother). But we continued to read to him until the time that he was emotionally,physically and educationally ready to dive into his own books.

But guess what? I have read to him at bedtime for 3 nights this week. Just because a child is a tween or a teen and is reading adult lit does not mean he does not like the experience of cuddling, hearing a fantastic story and looking at the pictures. We don't do it every night, we don't force it, and sometimes weeks go by between bedtime reads or daytime readalouds. But when we hang out at the bookstore (frequently) occasionally I will pick up a book that looks as if it has a compelling story and good pictures and ask him "Does this seem like a good readaloud?" so we ALWAYS have a great book to fall back on with reading aloud.

We do not give any rewards for reading and my kids don't like the summer reading program because they said that getting prizes made them feel that reading was something that needed to be bribed (like an unfavorite veggie). We just surround them with the warm feeling of choosing great books, room to discuss those books in the course of the day, and the ability to share them in a loving cuddly way when they are in the mood.

BTW, the book is "A City in Winter" by Chris van Allsburg. The writing and illustrations are worthy of a tween or teen readaloud!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

blessed2b

We love the Rocket Phonics program and Reading Eggs! The library has been such a huge resource for us. My kids beg to go! The summer reading where they earn prizes, picking out their own books, story-time, etc. Our library sometimes offers a time when kids can come in and read a book to a dog. They love that. I think that parents shouldn't get all caught up in kids reading by a certain age or pushing them to becoming bookworms. If it's a family way of life, like a sacred activity, they will want to participate. If you expose them to a wide variety of books they will eventually find a type that draws them in and gets them hooked.

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Lana

I think the key to developing a love forreading in your kids is to start reading to them when they are young.
When they were young, I read short books. Even my highschooler still wants me to read to them,
only now it's bigger books that we just read a chapter of a day.

I think developing a love for reading varies from child to child. It took my youngest a while to love reading, but
once she found the style she liked, she has been reading almost nonstop. My middle child has really enjoyed
reading books related to what he is studying in history.

So, read, read, read to them, and find what interests them!

4 years ago · Like · Comment

Emma s mom

Hell,I am a new member from Sweden.
My daughter gose to an english speaking school.
she is 10 and garde 3.
Is there anyone who would like their child to write to my daughter?
My adress is:
azadeh@mbox301.swipnet.se

5 years ago · Like · Comment
4R: Let me know if you are still seeking we have 5 girls that are from 9 to 12 that whould love to write your daughter e mail or "snail" mail thanks
4 years ago · Like

ValerieLynn

When we take a field trip or other adventure, I have my children write a list of bullets, up to 20 things they want to remember about the field trip. In that moment, they are often tired, but it provides a nice list to refresh their memories. A week or two later, I ask them to pull out their "bullets" and write a narrative essay about their experience. My teens are both boys and neither really cares to write, but this helps the motivation and reinforce the skills.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Gigi

I am a homeschooling grandma. When our grandkids parents (our four girls) were grade school age, we made a big deal of going to the library for free reading in the summer. They loved going and came home with a big stack of books. And they learned so many things that they were interested in. In the fall when they went back to school, they always did better on their diagnostic tests in all areas (often getting 100%) then they did the following spring after being in school for 9 months! So I really believe in free reading time, letting them choose their own books with guidance! And I really believe in home schooling, which I eventually did with our four girls.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Tracey P

I have two girls (12 and 14), homeschooled from the beginning who are avid readers (reading 3-4 books or more per month) and who love to write (spending their free time on "YoungWritersSociety.com"). What did I do? I read aloud to them from the time they were born. I think children who are read to associate pleasure with reading because they hear their parents' voice, cuddle on the couch, and enjoy calm moments together. I have always tried to avoid "twaddle", reading good books to the kids, even if they were a bit beyond their comprehension level. The sound of good literature is pleasing to their ears--so choose books like "Ping" or "Goodnight Moon" instead of "Sponge Bob goes to the Circus". My girls are Jr/Sr High age now, and I still read aloud to them every day (but now I read things like Little Women, while they knit or crochet on the couch). Other ideas are to help them keep a Book Log from the time they begin reading. It encourages them to see how many books they have read (and in our case, how many pages total they have read). At the end of each school year, they add up the total pages read and I give a monetary award (approx.$0.50 per 100 pages) that can be used on some fun summer activity (like going to Six Flags or a water park or buying a new skateboard). Now that they read more than 10,000 pages in a year, I may have to rethink my system a bit--but I love it that they are reading!
For writing, in addition to having the write every day (not just for school but letters to grandma, thank you notes, etc), I highly recommend Home2Teach.com and the great 6 week writing classes they offer. My girls have greatly benefited from these classes and are now strong, competent writers. I hope these ideas help!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Kimberly in Canada

Our whole family participates in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) and Script Frenzy every year - Dad too!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

onlysmallthings

After spending $200 on an expensive online reading program, we suspect the format is not appropriate for our son's learning style. Now, I'm using the internet and printing 100s of free, printable resources (flash cards, games, posters). I use images from colorful workbooks to make games ("Place the short /a/' pictures in the short /a/ circle of the Venn diagram and the short /e/ pictures in the short /e/ circle! If the words has both, place it between the two circles!"). These hands-on "games" are free and can be adapted to fit the needs of my son. We've also adopted a mascot (Sesame Street's Sherlock Hemlock) to adorn posters detailing "reading clues" my son uses to help him remember sounds, blends, etc. -- the posters hang on the refrigerator & schoolroom walls. I also use Lego Comic Maker to print comics and "flash cards" with a Lego-theme...Lego Maker allows me to print any text, so I can create phonics stories or, math cards (I made a Hero Factory 100s Chart). These personalized resources make our lessons 100% more fun than the rote memorization and monotony of the expensive online program we'd used last year.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

lauraw

We are surrounded by books in our home, and every night, our children read, are read to, or listen to an audiobook. We also check out audiobooks to listen to in the car when we travel. The best new thing we have added is Tuesday Tea and Poetry, where we sit for tea at 3 and take turns reading poetry out loud. We started about a month ago and my daughter, who is 8, started writing her own poetry and shares it during tea time. My children look forward to this each week. (Partly for the treats that we share with it!) This idea came from Julie Bogart's Bravewriter.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

scrapbea

One of our extras for writing is a family journal! Our 7 year old writes a message to one of the family members then passes it on to them for them to do the same. It will be a treasure one day!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

scrapbea

We Frequent a thrift store where paperback books and kids books are a quarter! I let the girls choose about 4 each trip that they love!! It is amazing watching them pour over the options to find the perfect treasures for their next reading time!!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Mindy B

We use a literature based curriculum so we always have Many, Many books. We have Spelling 100 goals, where the children learn 100 new words in a set amount of time with a reward at the end of that time. The same is for my up-and-coming reader. Goals! I also purchased the One Year Adventure Novel to encourage my soon to be 9th grader in his writing - story telling gift. I am excited to see what God has planned for my children as they read and learn from the adventures of new characters everyday.

5 years ago · Like · Comment
scrapbea: Love the spelling goal!
5 years ago · Like
Gigi: Me too!
5 years ago · Like

xerarose

I love reading, and my children are picking up the reading bug, just by watching me. We have stacks and stacks of books around - we're surrounded! In fact, my 8 year old would prefer reading than anything else, and I sometimes have to take away her books to chase her outside to play! But writing is different, because we have dysgraphia here, and often what I'll do is get them to "picture-write"- draw pictures of what they want to say, and then I title it later. It eencourages the writing process (sequencing, one-idea-to-a-sentence, etc) but doesn't allow the disability to discourage learning the skill. Then we do tons of copywork where we don't have to think of the ideas but focus on the formation of letters, words, sentences, and paragraphs - plus they get exposure to quotes, facts, ideas and poetry!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
scrapbea: Love the encouragement without the added stress!
5 years ago · Like
Gigi: Great ideas!
5 years ago · Like

eeejunesgirl

Something I just started with my youngest kids - 3 & 4 is to have them dictate a story to me and then have them do the pictures. When we're done they have a book written by them. It makes them so excited! Plus they can then go back & "read" it again & again!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
Mommymax: Have you ever thought about getting your kids a Illustory kit? I got one last year, and my kids had the best time writing their story and drawing the pictures. They even got to design the cover, write an "about the author" page, and add a photo of themselves. Once it was all done, we mailed it off and, about three weeks later, we got back a hard bound copy of their little book. It was so exciting for them, and it will be an awesome keepsake one day.
shj likes this. · 4 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: I had actually looked into this once. We're just homeschooling on a budget and found it cheaper to use the laminating machine I already have and make the binding out of cardboard that has been covered in wallpaper. While it doesn't have the professional look to it they are pretty neat and fairly easy to do...but thanks for the idea as I am sure lots of other people haven't heard of them.
4 years ago · Like

quinli

We use a traditional textbook for our literature studies, but we don't use it in a traditional way. Instead, we become revered book critics, offering our praise and improvement tips to a wide variety of writers. Not even the greats, such as Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, William Shakespeare, or Jane Austen, can escape our scrutiny. The writers who earn the most praise are honored by having their names added to our "Must Read More by This Author" list. The really boring guys find their names on the "Uh-uh. Never Again" list. It is always interesting to hear my daughter's reasons why she admires or despises a particular writer. Critical thinking and classic literature have never been so much fun!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

inspiredbyjulia

One tradition we've embraced is reading "Wee Little Lambs" (Rod and Staff periodicals) at breakfast time. Reading them has inspired my 8-year old to start writing her own "Rod and Staffs" (as she calls them). We've got dozens of these little gems saved and will enjoy looking back on them in years to come, spelling errors and all! :)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

pressed4time

Funny thing, when I have to go outside, I usually put music on the radio. recently my son asked for the news channel because perhaps he wanted to Hear the voices???

5 years ago · Like · Comment

pressed4time

We love audio books and my son likes listening as he falls asleep. I find a book we can read together as a family at bedtime also. No matter how stressful the day, the excitement of a good book transports all of us to dreamland!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

HSlater351

Every day we have one hour of silent reading for older kids and someone reads to the younger kids.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

olycher

My kids are teens now, but the way I got them reading and writing was to allow them to read about, and write about, the things that interested them. Whenever possible, I have given them choices in what they read--it's ALL learning, no matter what the subject might be. Another thing that accidentally happened, and is rather unorthodox, is that my son really learned to read by playing video games. There are certain games out there where the characters don't talk, per se--what they say is written on the screen. So if the player wants to follow instructions and advance the game, they have to be able to read what the character is "saying". This ties in with letting them read what they are interested in--sometimes video games CAN be educational, even the ones that aren't listed as such.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

tomatosandwich

Teaching my daughters to love reading was easy. Both of them relished in daily reading at home and books on CD in the car. They were both independent readers at an early age, and they love sharing what they have read with the family at the dinner table.

My son has been more of a challenge. Not quite 7 yet, he finds sitting still and listening to books to be torture. He can read simple books, but it's not fun. Desperate, I asked him what he wanted to read--more action! We couldn't find stories about dueling aliens and kids exploring mysterious lands at his level, though.

Then I had the idea: I'll let him dictate the story to me! So now he "writes" his own books! I write what he tells me to write, and then he goes back and fills in the pictures. Because he finds the story exciting, he is willing to read back over the pages to figure out what picture to draw on what page. He gets extra excited when we choose one of his books for family reading in the evening! Now he claims he just might want to be a writer some day! I think this solution finally has him on his way to loving reading and writing!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
Gigi: I am going to do that! Thanks.
5 years ago · Like

blessedmomof3

I have 3 Children ages 12-18 and my oldest didn't start reading until almost 7years of age .
I always read to him since he was a baby ,did the same with the 2 younger ones,I used to pray for God to give him a desire to read,and finally at the age of almost 7 he just took off,it has been 11 years ever since and I feel like I should have a special corner in the area libraries because we are there every other day.

This child that didn't want to have anything to do with writing and reading, now ,that's all he wants to do ,he has writen many short stories,1 published and wants to be a journalist(going to college for it),my other 2 children love to read also ,I always made books available and always read to him and the other 2,my younger daughter started to read at the age of 4 and so did my middle child,but neither one loves to read or write as much as my oldest .

My advice just keep on reading to them and make it fun,specially when they are young ,I use to make all the sound effects ,they still talk about that, they say that mom is the queen of sound effects.

Keep on reading together and answer all their questions as much as possible.
Have Fun.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

lisa

We were told again and again by educators when our DD was2 ish, that as long as she grew up loving to read this would foster all avenues of education. Thus from the beginning we encouraged library trips, get to know your librarian, books all over the home, audio books galore, paired an audio book with the actual book, read to her 30 mins or more every day, her sitter reads to her as well. Now at 7 yo she is a voracious reader and can't wait for her play time in which she pops in an audio while enjoying art, legos, or other toys.

What do we do now?
We still read to her several times a week - typically a series now such as Lord of the Rings.

We encourage bedtime reading of at least 30 mins or more a night - her choice of books.

When she pops questions out now - I write them down and we head to the library once a month to find books that may give her the answers. The questions kids can come up with are all over the map from how do car wheels work to the anatomy of a bug. Thus this takes us naturally to all the crevices of the library.

We participate in NaNoWriMo (a month of writing project that the kids get to publish)- but I let her dictate the story to me, allowing a free flow of thoughts. She simply goes back to edit with our help. Then you get this nifty bound version in the mail. Very cool.

Also we DO NOT focus on having her write all of her own answers, paragraphs, short stories and such. We believe this can be very frustrating and limits the freedom to write creatively when your young hand muscles are having trouble keeping up with the flow of thoughts. So we alternate between having her write out an answer or a paragraph, and dictating to me the same. This frees her up immensely and gives her encouragement.

I've also read and do believe that kids naturally learn grammar, spelling, writing styles by reading varied material. Which brings us back to the beginning, the advice to simply read, read, read, read, read. :)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Vicky S.

I find books with subjects that they are really interested in. For my son, that would be Star Wars or super heroes. For my daughter, that would be animal stories of any kind, but especially dogs.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Love at Homeschool

I start taking them to Reading Time at the library at 4 days old and don't stop till they don't want to go...so far, they still want to go. They each get their own library card as soon as the library will let them have one.

I place my, or their, finger under the words as we sing hymns at church each week.

As they watch, I write grocery lists, chore lists, etc. while saying the word.

I drop everything I'm doing if my youngest wants me to read to her, and I keep reading until she is done.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Christine

My kids love reading to the dog! :-) They sit in his dog bed while he is trying to take a nap and they read to him. It is the funniest thing, but they really enjoy it! They also like to read books related to shows or movies that they like to watch. :-)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

keglinja

I make sure we build in time to read. My oldest LOVES to read and I give him time to. My 2nd child does not naturally enjoy reading, so I try to help her find books that will challenge her just a bit, but that I think will also pique her interest. We have found she really like biographies. My youngest is a newer reader, but really like it and still loves to be read to. I adored reading a as child, so I want my kids to find their own love of reading, however that looks for each of them.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

HeatherB

From a very early age, we encouraged my daughter to read. She always loved being read to, and I would place my finger underneath each word and sound it out as I read to her. She read her first few words at 4, and wrote her first poem at age 6! Each evening, after dinner, we would read poetry from a 100 year old poetry book, she would love to memorize hers and recite it to us! Now she is 15, and has been selected for, and attended, 2 writing residencies, she is a voracious reader and passionate writer...and I am a proud homeschooling mom ;)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Mom O\' Many

Read everyday. At some point in the day (usually multiple times) you will find us piled on the couch, cuddling up to a good story. I have my own stack of books that I read myself (they see me reading), and I read to the children everyday. We visit the library almost weekly and come home with stacks of books, usually maxing out our card limit. I let the children pick out books of interest to them, plus I like to reserve some that I find on booklists or ones that have been recommended on a certain topic and we dig in. For older readers, I will get books that I think they would like (or "should" read) and place them strategically around the house for them to discover. :)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Happy Reader

Read, read, read, read, read with them...from birth (yes, indeed!), and on, and on, and on. Read piles of picture books at each sitting. Read as family. Invite friends over for a good read-together. Have a family reading night instead of a movie night. Read together at meal times. Read on car trips. Give books as gifts, and ask for books as gifts. Read everywhere. Climb a tree, perch on a branch and read. Read in a tree house. Go for a hike, find the biggest tree in the woods, settle yourselves against its trunk and read. Read at the park. Read in a tent. Read when you are waiting. Read in bed. Read under your bed with a flashlight. Read in the attic. Read in a hammock. Read on the porch. Find a hiding spot and read. Read in the rain. Read during a storm. Read under the stars. Read by moonlight. Go to the library just to read. Never stop reading together...ever!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

DonnaJ

My children are really young, so I encourage their love of reading by reading to them as often as I can. They both love books, and even my 19 month old frequently brings books to me, plops in my lap and says "Read!" I encourage their future love of writing through coloring and drawing and also encouraging their storytelling. My oldest loves to tell stories, and as former English teacher, I know that allowing her to tell stories in her own words will encourage her to write as she gets older.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

mayfam4

We use Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading. We also make MANY trips to the library and read, read, read! I read to both children (ages 6 and 8) almost daily, and they read to me (and each other) often as well. We also use/used Five In A Row, which introduced the children to some excellent books, and showed them how much can be found in good book.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Elizabeth

Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, Phonics, reading aloud A LOT to them.
For writing, my children like to make up "newspaper articles" after I provide them a who, what, where, when, why chart (sometimes I have them team up and make up the 5 Ws for each other!).

5 years ago · Like · Comment

swimfinsmom

I noticed that despite my lecturing, my kids tended to "judge a book by its cover." They were missing out on some great books because they were looking for the slick, shiny book with fancy illustrations. I decided to do something like the Brownie "Try It". I'd read the first chapter or two in as dramatic a fashion as possible, and then put it down -- it was up to them if they wanted to continue reading, and they always did! We called it our Book Try It time.

5 years ago · Like · Comment
LouiseinMoz: I loved this idea. We have had the same "don t like the cover" problem in our house .. but my daughter has now (finally) got the idea that horrid covers can conceal wonderful stories, and that bright, happy covers don t necessarily mean a good one. I also buy loads of second hand books on auction - often really ancient ones -which has helped to bring this point home!
5 years ago · Like

K

I have used the book Phonics Pathways: Clear steps to Easy Reading and perfect spelling by Jossey-Bass to teach my 6 year old to read and I am now using it with our 4 year old. It is easy to follow and really teaches them "to read" Because they learn to read they also learn to spell. Our 6 year old is reading and can comprehend chapter books and attempting to write his own books :) I do supplement his learning with language arts programs and activities and we are starting to use a book that teaches punctuation. However as far as reading skills I credit the 15-20 a day we have spent over the past (1 1/2 school years) going through Phonics Pathways.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

chaj

Yes growing up I liked to read then in high school I lost the love of reading then a couple of years ago I picked up the love of reading again and when I gave birth to my first child and heard the importance of reading to them I did so, I began reading to her at first it seamed that she was not paying attention and as she got older she really enjoyed it and now her favorite trips are to the library and at night she asks to be read to her. She just turn 4 years old and loves books and I have since also had a boy who is 2 he is different but he is finally getting the joy of reading. So it is a lifelong project that we are responsible to instill in them the love of learning and reading but the best way is for ourselves to model it also.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

hsmom56514

I have been homeschooling for 17 years and have found the best way to instill a love of reading in a child is to read, read and read more! I started reading to my children when they were just babies. AA Milne and Virginia Lee Burton were some favorite authors, while books like Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel and Pat the Bunny were favorite books. We read them over and over and over. I always tried to stay away from the "popular" books, as I found them to be poorly written. Stick with the classic books and you'll find out why they are still around after all these years!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

wolfcrazy

We go to the public library usually twice a week. One of the trips is and always been storytime during one of the days that we are there. We've done this for many years. The kids have their own cards and have the freedom to pick their own books (with some parental guidance, of course). We are also friends with the librarians who go out of their way to help my kids get the books they want. My husband and I have always and still do, set the example by getting books ourselves and the kids see us read as well.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

gardeningjill

We go to the library as often as we can with our 3-1/2 year old and 21-month-old boys. They love books! I let them choose the books they want, and supplement their selections with other books I think will pique their interest as well as those that might stretch them a little. Reading is a regular activity in our house, and in addition to spontaneous moments of "Mommy, read me this book," we have our routine of books in the morning after breakfast, books before naptime, and books before bedtime, where they each chose one and I or their dad choose one (for a total of 3) at a time.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Shmagu

We have four children and 3 of them love to read or love being read too. The one that did not like to read for the pleasure of reading also did not like writing. So, my husband and I had to come up with a way for him to get motivated about reading & writing. We decided that his older brother and him should start a podcast! They have to read and write their "script" and then record it. It has turned into a wonderful way for him
to see & hear the subject come alive. He is now eager to do the research (reading) as
well as writing the story line. Now we have 4 children who love to read & write!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

rawlingsrg

Reading and writing were not my favorite things when I grew up. So, one of my goals for my kids was to help them enjoy both. We started very young writing and drawing in a journal everyday. First, they would tell me a couple of sentences that I would write and they would copy, then eventually they were writing on their own. They always got to draw a picture then that evening at dinner they would share theirs with Daddy! They still love to write in their journal and have become confident writers as they have gotten older.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

misty

My son hates writing with a pen and paper, but loves telling stories. So he uses a word processor to type his stories and print them out. The spelling and grammar check has taught him a lot. He also writes on his own blog. He and his brother play storytelling games. I think fostering his creativity and imagination is more important than handwriting practice.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Beckie

Every morning we read poetry together. We snuggle on the couch, and I let the kids pick a poem out of a big poetry anthology that we have. They're exposed to colorful language, new vocabulary, rich emotions, poetic forms, history, and they always beg for more! Not only do they enjoy the reading but they also associate it with happy times.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

fudge4u

Have a child who has trouble beginning to write papers? Does he like to act, perform & pretend? When it comes time for him to write, ask him to imagine himself as a character presenting the material. For example, recently I wanted my son to write a persuasive essay on a local issue regarding our Farmer's Market, so I asked him to imagine himself as a character who was presenting an argument to allow non-agricultural items to be sold in a local Farmer's Market. I try to get him to imagine the whole play. I ask him to "see" who might be at the meeting. (supporting characters-helps determine audience) Where this is being presented?(setting-helps determine voice) Who might be in favor of it? (Maybe the hero?) Who might be against it?(Maybe the villain?) I ask him to think about the issue as a storyline in a play. Before he knows it, he is writing the character's lines with passion. Almost any type of writing can be thought about in this way. Even younger kids can do it, because they love to pretend. Just ask them what they would say if they were playing...(store, school, zoo, cafe, whatever) and the situation of the paper they are to write arose. They don't call a play, a play for nothing! What kid doesn't like to "PLAY?"

5 years ago · Like · Comment

squaredancemom

When our children were young and before they could read, my husband would sit down every evening with them and read from one of the classics. Afterwards we would ask them to explain in their own words what was happening and what had happened the night before. As they got older, we asked them to each take a turn reading from the book, this included our science, history, social studies, and geography books. Most of our children can be found in a corner reading any of the books we have available on many subjects. Now, we have a daughter (she's 18) that wants to be a writer. She has read many of the academic papers I had to write for my classes, and I have shared with her my own novella attempt. We talk about her book and ways of making it an enjoyable read for everyone. In the fall she will be entering the University to start her degree in Literature and Journalism.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Debbie

At the beginning of summer, I printed out a reading list from some of our curriculum providers. I pretty much gave them carte blanche to pick whatever they wanted from that list. Once they read a book, and enjoy it, I encouraged other books by the same author. This is how my oldest has read 14 Charles Dickens books! She inspired her sister and now they read them together and discuss them. Many of them are on Masterpiece Theatre so we watch the episodes and compare them to the book. Great discussions and we love our movie nights!
I also let them read in the mornings when they wake up and before they go to bed. We start school "later" in the morning but really, they've put in an hour or so of reading before school starts. We also have an hour of quiet time in the afternoons several times a week and they go in their rooms and read (no electronics allowed -- except for ereaders). Also, the older kids read to the youngest. The kids see their parents reading and enjoying books so that is helpful.
As for writing...that is a whole other issue. Creative writing classes are helpful because they have peer encouragement. Also writing about things they enjoy, journal entries, and making their own books with illustrations. (I like the "stop, drop, and write" suggestion!!) --lots of other good ideas I will now incorporate as well! Thanks!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

sunnydaydaycare

Any time we go somewhere we ask our kids if they know the history of a place, or why something was made, and for what purpose. When they say they don't know. We remind them that they can read books on it to find out. Our sons favorite thing to do when we go out is to read the signs to us. His reading imporved greatly when we asked him to tell us where we are. :-) Reminding them that stories are a way to travel places without leaving the house has helped our daughter to pick up books and read on her own. She loves anything with castles and princesses.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

sheriblanch

My kids sometimes have trouble initiating writing projects. To combat that "writer's block", and make it less stressful, I sometimes do quick drills. I'll call out a "stop,drop and write" drill, and set the timer. They have only 1,2 or (occasionally) a whopping 3 minutes to write a quick story. It can be about an event that happened that day, week or even just a silly made up story. Somehow, even a quick tale of ninja-dinosaur-zombie-warriors is all it takes to get their minds working again.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Bookworm

I love to read and write, so it seems likely that my children will, too. Aside from the usual teaching, reading, and writing that is assigned throughout the day, I have allowed time for my children to experiment with what they enjoy, and voila! . . . my daughter enjoys writing. She has written little books for her brother to help him practice his reading. I encouraged her and gently provided help with spelling as needed. I don't go instantly into critiquing her work. I first point out all of the things that are good about her writings, then I will ask if she wants me to proofread it and point out where there are misspellings or wrong punctuation. I waited until she was ready. When she was, I praised her for her maturity and told her that even professional writers have people proofread their work.
She is now writing chapter books, with illustrations (she loves to draw, too). The more she shares these with others and hears their response, the more she is encouraged to do more.

To encourage my children in reading, I let them select books that interest them at the library and I make sure the content is good and the reading level is not too hard for them. Sometimes, I will choose books that I think will spark their interest, that they might not have thought of or found on their own.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

mindfulmom

I have 2 boys that cannot get enough of books. If they are not reading themselves, they ask to be read to. Books are everywhere in our lives - home, car, and in book bags when on the go. They not only line the walls of our family room, but are also in the kitchen, bathrooms, and bedrooms. Also, trips to the library are a regular activity in our schedule. Simply put, we have made books ubiquitous. Reading is not something the boys "must do," but rather, it is something they enjoy doing for its own pleasure. I make a point of being tuned into what they are reading so that we can discuss the books and develop their level of reading comprehension.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

lynn898

Like most parents I read to her from the get go. My squirt wanted her ownn say after a while and learned very early how to read. Now she can't put the books down. She loves that she can learn or imagine absolutely anything on the planet. We still read together. I think it's important to have that bond with her. We have special stay in the pj's and read and snuggle in bed days. We parallel read or take turns reading to each other.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

jcizasm04

My 3rd grade daughter started to enjoy writing when she had something interesting to write about. For instance, we were reading about Frederick Douglass in social studies and she was so into the book she didnt want to put it down. She was able to fill up her brainstorm pages and write her short essay with ease. Having an interesting topic really helped us out! She now looks forward to her writing assignments because she knows she's going to be reading a true story full of interesting people and facts.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

LauraIowa

A parent who is a reader and life-long learner shares with excitement and true feeling that love of the written word with children by turing off the television, cell phone, or video game, and spending more time in creative activities. My son was honored when I installed a hammock in the treehouse and announced he could "read his language arts books" outside. We have very few homeschooled kids in our community, so he could actually hear the public students at recess while he rocked in the hammock reading! He felt special, trusted, and that feeling has grown to include reading voluntarily books in other subjects. From birth to death, role modeling is imperative: children do what they see us do, not what we say. If you are not a reader/writer, begin. No one has to create a New York Times best seller to provide inspiration to our kids! Write an encourging note and see what gets popped into your mailbox someday!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

eeejunesgirl

My kids never had a chance to be anything other than a lover of the written word! From great-great-great grandparents down to my kids - we have all had a major love of reading (and in most cases writing, as well).Every member of our family has their own bookcase for their books, and we have a "library" area in our school room that contains a TON of books. Not only were my kids forced to listen to classical music while I was pregnant, they also got read to! At the time it was mainly college texts because I was in school during almost everyone of my pregnancies! lol Then as babies & toddlers they have always been around reading, writing & general learning activities. We've always kept fun learning games & crafts around to be done anytime they want. Multiple sets of magnet letters - so once they do know how to read they can actually spell with those same letters that they were throwing around the house not too long before. I just make sure to surround them with possibilities & chances to love reading & writing in the toys they play with (majority is educational), creative fun - like MadLibs, reading time, and an unending supply of books - cloth, plastic, foam, cardboard, paperbacks, hardcovers, etc. Something we really have fun with is doing a family create-a-story where I give the kids the first sentence and the last sentence - and they have to figure out the rest! A lot of time we set it up so each kid says one sentence and they go around the room until the story is done. Sometimes I have each of them write a paragraph after the first one is done they pass the page along to the next - with the younger kids I will write for them. I just make sure the opportunity is there for them to read, write, be creative - and we have daily story time where all the kids get to listen to me read to them. I also set aside at least 30 minutes a day for the kids to read quietly to themselves. I haven't forced them to do it. But I have made sure that they have always been surrounded by things that help encourage a love of the written word. And it must be working because so far each child has taught themselves how to read by the age of 4!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

stephieteufel

We read to our two sons a lot, which has really instilled a deep love of reading.

We keep the TV mostly off when they are awake (except for some special sporting events like the Olympics or Hockey games).

My older son, who just turned 6, loves to write his own stories... at first he would dictate these to me, but now he is able to write short sentences on his own, sounding out phonetically and asking for help as needed.

We also have begun nature journals which include art and descriptive writing and labeling.

One of our most recent finds has been the Dr. Suess apps for the iPhone... when we are stuck somewhere where I can't read to him myself (long car ride, for example), he can have the app read the book to him, or he can read it and ask for help with certain words. We can then read the physical book later. We did this with the Lorax and then also went to see the movie for his birthday... which led to an interesting comparison of the two stories, what was the same, different, better, less good, etc. Our next Lorax activity is making Lorax moustaches and going out to the woods to see if they trees have anything they'd like us to say for them :-)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

leisuretime

I wait for my child to be ready to progress, whether reading or writing (or math!). Reduces frustration on both of our parts and builds the child's confidence.
If the child is struggling (for instance with "100 Easy Lessons" book, when the lesson required longer than 15-20 minutes), I put the book up and we spend our time reviewing what the child has already learned. After a week, we try a new lesson. If the child still has difficulty, the book goes back up. Once we had to wait three months for my daughter's brain to be ready to progress. But then we zoomed through.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

leisuretime

For reading we used "How to Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons". One of the least expensive and most effective books I've used! Short lessons every day, but the child is reading quickly and so fun to watch his/her little eyes light up!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

bladinmama

Audio books have been the key for us! From the time my kids were little, we have listened to audio books during lunch and in the car. There are very few books that you can't get on audio through the local library and through inter library loan. This year, we have listened to "Emma", "Jane Eyre", and Mansfield Park". One of the best parts of my 17 years of home schooling has been all the wonderful audio books I have enjoyed with my kids. These books encompass everything from "Ramona the Pest" and "A Series of Unfortunate Event" to classics like "Jane Eyre". The bonus with audio books is that you get professional actors as the narrators/readers; so the listening is great!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

rlb46341

I don't edit creative writing until late JrHi. Nothing kills creativity quicker than the thought that it's going to be ripped apart!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Sounds like a good idea. When my kids have to write anything I have always let them do an exercise where they have to sit down & write continuous for 15-30 minutes and then give them a chance to go back and rewrite it in a more orderly manner. But I can't NOT go back and work with them to make corrections - like capitalization & punctuation. Then I have them read it out loud so they can decide if they want to make any changes themselves. So I am curious to know more about the not editing process and how you go about transitioning from doing no edits to editing? Also do you involve your kid(s) in the edit process once you begin doing it? Thank YOU!
5 years ago · Like
rlb46341: Once they do begin editing I will start by just letting them write. Then they'll have an assignment to go back and look for spelling/capitalization errors. Then several days later will be checking for subject/verb agreement and just to be sure the sentences make sense and flow. Then other content and so forth. Depending on the type or assignment it could take a few weeks (especially something like a research report.) If it's just a creative writing assignment I may not even make them edit at all. Creative is just that imo, to get their brains flowing. Once they think they're don editing then I will scribble on it and have them reedit for a final finished paper. So, I usually will only look at it once they think they have fully edited it themselves.
5 years ago · Like

faithful8

Reading aloud has always been a favorite family activity of ours. We have read biographies and many classics together. My oldest two kids attended public school for awhile before we started homeschooling . I always hated the way they approached reading as a chore with 30 minutes of "required" reading. At very young ages, my kids were encouraged to find favorite books and authors. Free time was time to read or listen to audiobooks. My kids became lovers of books at very young ages. People would ask how in the world I accomplished this feat since most of their kids thought reading was a boring task. I would always respond to their question with some questions of my own. Do you love reading? What is your favorite book? What types of books are in your home? How long do you read every day? Do you read aloud to your child? How much free time is spent reading vs television watching or video games being played? Quickly I noticed a pattern. Most parents with struggling readers, hated reading themselves. Alot of the books chosen for their kids to read were the types of books that frankly, I would have found boring too. So I would share my secrets. Find some of the great classic books. Look for books that enhance a personal interest of yours whether it is gardening, traveling, sports, etc. Share your interest and enthusiasm with your kids by reading at least portions of the book together and talk about it. Teach your kids that books are their BEST friends! Books open up a whole new adventure that television and video games can never do. I do not want distractions in my home. I believe children will develop an appetite for what they are given. I always encourage my kids to stay away from video games and television because they are killers of the imagination and creativity. If they want to watch a movie and it is based on a book, I encourage them to read the book first. Many times I have heard them lament how the book was SO much better than the movie! I love hearing my kids share their favorite books with me! And if I ever limited my kids to 30 minutes of reading they would think it was cruel and unusual punishment!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: You bring up some REALLY good points - not to make reading a chore & developing an appetite for what they are given! I know when I posted I said that I set aside at least 30 minutes for quiet reading because so many times they WILL read a LOT longer! Lol Creativity & having learning tools available has made it so much easier for my kids to develop a love of reading. It warms my heart to have a room full of toys and when the kids get quiet I always go check on them (you just never know right?) only to find them hiding in corners or laying on the couch reading a book!
faithful8 likes this. · 5 years ago · Like
Lady Rocketeer: Absolutely! You can go to www.enrichmentcircle.com under >The Circle Gazette there is a submission form to fill in and you can also read some issues online. Or you can email the article/artwork to info@enrichmentcircle.com. Or you can snail mail original ART for us to scan and process at: The Circle Gazette, 7551 Normande Ct. Margate FL 33063. ALL ORIGINAL WILL BE RETURNED. Parents will be given a release form to fill out on their child's behalf. Submitting is free and the author will receive 2 free copies as compensation for their work. It is a non-profit 501c3, volunteer hours are earned for their time.
5 years ago · Like
Lady Rocketeer: I apologize, I accidentally replied to the wrong post.
5 years ago · Like

CherylB

My 9yr old boy was the challenge to get to read. I found a huge book series that captured all his interest. Cats, fantasy, warriors. In the beginning I would have him read at bed time. He would do anything not to go to bed so reading was his way to get what he wanted. Pretty soon we were taking the book away just so he would go to sleep. He started to pick up the book on his own throughout the day after that. Now 16 books later, I have moved on to adding a bit more variety in his reading selection with adding books to the kindle ereader. I knew the day he was hooked when he said, "reading is not a punishment anymore."

5 years ago · Like · Comment

faithful8

Reading aloud has always been a favorite family activity of ours. We have read biographies and many classics together. My oldest two kids attended public school for awhile before we started homeschooling . I always hated the way they approached reading as a chore with 30 minutes of "required" reading. At very young ages, my kids were encouraged to find favorite books and authors. Free time was time to read or listen to audiobooks. My kids became lovers of books at very young ages. People would ask how in the world I accomplished this feat since most of their kids thought reading was a boring task. I would always respond to their question with some questions of my own. Do you love reading? What is your favorite book? What types of books are in your home? How long do you read every day? Do you read aloud to your child? How much free time is spent reading vs television watching or video games being played? Quickly I noticed a pattern. Most parents with struggling readers, hated reading themselves. Alot of the books chosen for their kids to read were the types of books that frankly, I would have found boring too. So I would share my secrets. Find some of the great classic books. Look for books that enhance a personal interest of yours whether it is gardening, traveling, sports, etc. Share your interest and enthusiasm with your kids by reading at least portions of the book together and talk about it. Teach your kids that books are their BEST friends! Books open up a whole new adventure that television and video games can never do. I do not want distractions in my home. I believe children will develop an appetite for what they are given. I always encourage my kids to stay away from video games and television because they are killers of the imagination and creativity. If they want to watch a movie and it is based on a book, I encourage them to read the book first. Many times I have heard them lament how the book was SO much better than the movie! I love hearing my kids share their favorite books with me! And if I ever limited my kids to 30 minutes of reading they would think it was cruel and unusual punishment!!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

SimpleMom

To unleash the love of reading in my children, I try to set a good example. I make sure that they see me reading, and I read to them everyday. We also participate in library reading time.

We read all over the house. Sometimes at the kitchen table, in our classroom, on the couch, on the floor, and in the bed.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

sweetpea

First, I am the example for a love of reading. I participate in the summer reading program at the library, too. My children regularly see me read and I've read to them since they were babies. I promote educational TV shows that emphasize phonics and select books as gifts. I found a great spelling website for them to use and stretch their reading skills by using books ahead of their grade levels. Both my son and daughter read well above grade level. We joined the Pizza Hut Book-It Club this year.

5 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Can you share the spelling website you use? I am trying to find some additional ones to Click N Spell for my kids. Each one learns differently and I am trying to find a variety of website that are available for them to each try. Thank you!
5 years ago · Like
eeejunesgirl: Can you share the spelling website you use? I am trying to find some additional ones to Click N Spell for my kids. Each one learns differently and I am trying to find a variety of website that are available for them to each try. Thank you!
5 years ago · Like
sweetpea: Sure. I use www.spellingcity.com for my 5 year old in Pre-K and my 3rd grader. We use the free access games and lists. I googled spelling lists for each age/grade and then plugged them into lists. For my 3rd grader, I have 33 spelling lists for the year. On Mondays, she writes each word twice. On Tuesdays, she uses Teach Me to learn the list and then one game. Wed.-Thurs, she does the the Spelling Test for practice and one game. Also on Thursday, she reviews the printed list and vocabulary definitions and Friday is the written test. My five year old just learns spelling from the lists provided and plays the games. Hope that's helpful.
5 years ago · Like

Ch33kyb3ar

We recently had the good fortune to go on an extended field trip overseas. Before our trip I purchased a Kindle. It arrived 2 days before we were due to leave. Who knew that switching up the format from books to a Kindle would spur a reading frenzy? My daughter read 20 YA books in 8 weeks! I find that the more she reads, the more she enjoys trying to write her own stories.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Christine

My sons like to sit in the dog's bed with him and they read to him like he is really listening! :-) It is cute to watch, and it keeps them motivated to read! :-)

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Randi

My daughter and I take frequent trips to bookstores. She loves to explore new stores and see what they have to offer. Somehow the book she purchases there needs to be devoured NOW.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

catsknit

Being an avid reader myself, I have always wanted my children to love it, too, so I have read to them daily since they were very tiny, even before they understood the words. They also had audiobooks on tape at bedtime and in the car. One of my children is dyslexic and needed more than the usual help learning to read, so I learned all I could about dyslexia and learned to tutor him. He now reads on grade level and most importantly, enjoys reading! One thing I also insist on, is that for any movie we're going to see that came from a book, they read it first. I think it's important for them to picture the story in their own minds before seeing it on screen. And lastly, just the example they see of me reading for myself daily is invaluable.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Lady Rocketeer

I am blessed to be volunteering for a children's newspaper, the Circle Gazette, and through that I read it to my girls (ages 4 and 6) the stories and articles that other children write and we muse about the poetry and artwork. My older daughter has been able to join on PR events, we recently were invited to celebrate Dr. Seuss's 108 birthday/Read Across America Day by reading a Dr. Seuss book to a third grade class. One of our young writers, Sara, age 11, read to the class. Seeing the amazing things kids are writing about has given her a lot of motivation to submit her own artwork and have me transcribe short stories to publish. The newspaper is completely written by children and while most the authors are from our area, it is open to any child in the world, that gives us the opportunity to learn about what 'real' children are doing across the U.S. and in other countries. They just love to see their work in print, in a real newspaper! The printed edition comes out a couple weeks after the deadline, so they usually have forgotten about their submission, it is a treat to see their face light up and this gives them the motivation to start the next story, it is a really cool, self-perpetuating project. I really appreciate the delayed gratification.

5 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: That sounds like fun! Can you give me the info so my kids can look into it? I have a couple of kids in high school that have expressed an interest in writing for a newspaper and this one sounds like it would be a lot of fun for them, especially since it is written by other kids!
5 years ago · Like
Lady Rocketeer: Absolutely! You can go to www.enrichmentcircle.com under >The Circle Gazette there is a submission form to fill in and you can also read some issues online. Or you can email the article/artwork to info@enrichmentcircle.com. Or you can snail mail original ART for us to scan and process at: The Circle Gazette, 7551 Normande Ct. Margate FL 33063. ALL ORIGINAL WILL BE RETURNED. Parents will be given a release form to fill out on their child's behalf. Submitting is free and the author will receive 2 free copies as compensation for their work. It is a non-profit 501c3, volunteer hours are earned for their time.
5 years ago · Like

jbemom

My oldest won an international reading award from the Accelerated Reader program in 4th grade and parents were always asking me how I got such a good reader. What have I done? I have always fostered a love of learning with my children by reading to them since birth, even past the time they knew how to read themselves. I have been willing to spend $$$ on books instead of on "fad" toys. I limit the amount of time and the quality of the tv shows watched. I made sure that my kids had books not only that were classical in nature, but included books that interested them. I believe these steps have helped a great deal to foster the love of reading in my kids!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

flourgirl

Being an avid reader myself, I have worked diligently to make sure that my two children grew up loving books. I read to them starting with my pregnancies. First, if your child is not really "into" reading, search out books that would be of interest to them. Read to them, read to them, read to them. Even now that they are older and can read for themselves, I still read to them both. A great guide for selecting read-alouds (as well as a wealth of other info) is the Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease. As far as writing, my 11-year-old and 8-year-old were both given journals as gifts. At first we had to remind them or encourage them to write down funny, scary, interesting, sad, and wonderful things that happened to them. They would forget they had the journal. Now we don't have to prompt them at all. Each night they have 30 minutes of reading time before lights out. Sometimes I see them writing in their journals instead of reading--I'm okay with that! Also, we encourage them to write down stories they make up, or poetry, or comics. My son dislikes writing poetry (loves to read it, though), but he loves to make up stories or write comic strips. My daughter is a prolific writer. It is all I can do to keep up with reading her stories/poetry.

5 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Journaling is such a wonderful thing to teach kids. I have always kept one myself, and it fell by the wayside when I started going to college. But I picked up the Purpose Driven Life at our Church bookstore and it came with a journal to use while doing the daily Bible lessons. Needless to say I got hooked again. I started to realize that a lot of the Bible lesson books, especially for teens, came with journals. It was sort of a natural thing for me to have the kids journal while doing their daily Bible lesson, and it just flowed into journaling for creative writing and/or just a daily journal to get their thoughts out.
5 years ago · Like

IAMOM05

I have read to my children since they were tiny babies, maybe even before they were born. I read often myself and I think between me reading frequently to them and seeing me read they have picked it up avidly. My non-reader will sit and look at books for long periods of time and now he has a TAG to listen to them and try to read himself. As soon as my oldest learned to read herself (which she did rather quickly) there was no stopping her. I've provided a ridiculous amount to books and read to them often. Apparently a combination of all these things has led them to their own love of books! We're still working on writing...again, I give a journal or something for my only school-aged child to think about and write about almost daily. Seeing many troubles, I just started having her copy. She doesn't have to do the thinking, and can practice her writing, and maybe will pick up some good vocabulary words and writing styles in the process.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

mommyshanti

I think always having access to books is the key. We make weekly trips to the library,have family read-alouds nightly as well as leisurely reading during the day.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

cdrumm4448

I read aloud to my kids about two hours a day. They read to themselves a minimum of 30 minutes a day. I LOVE to read, so that's something I want to instill in my kids. You will be a lifelong learner in you only read!

5 years ago · Like · Comment

GigiWendy

My son, who is almost 11, is also a reluctant reader. We do a lot of reading on his kindle together, each reading every other page. I let him choose books that interest him yet challenge him. We also read books that have been turned into movies (Harry Potter, A Little Princess, The Secret Garden, Hunger Games, etc....) and when we are finished the book, we watch the movie together and compare the book with the movie.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

msomom

Before leaving the public school to teach my children at home, an expert reading teacher gave me the following advice, "Always read to your children at least 2 grade levels above where they can read themselves. Expose them to the great literature. Be sure what they read and what you read to them is well-written and has value, not just what is popular." I have followed this advice and all three of my children are avid book-lovers.

5 years ago · Like · Comment

Anna P.

My 3rd grader is a reluctant reader, so I tried something i call the Umbrella Reading Project. She had to read 6 books each one in a different genre (Folk Tale, Non-Fiction, Sports, Animals, Biography, and Fiction). I got the umbrella from the Scholastic March Monthly Idea. She then had to write a short report on each book. She loves it because get gets to experiment with different types of books. My eldest an 8th grade wants to do one this summer.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Dotty

Our 2 oldest were reluctant readers until we paid them $1for every book they read for several months.Now they are both reading all the time,it was well worth the money.

6 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Creative way to get them going!
5 years ago · Like

Jessica

My 4th grade son loves reading but did not know what to write. Now He image s a picture story first and it helps a lot.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Finding assignments that are exciting and encourage our three girls, grades 6, 5 and 2 to write can be a challenging process. We have resorted to bribery but that is not the answer! We have found two amazing ideas that work well for all three of them. First we have found that our children love to share their stories. We have encouraged them to make power point projects with animation and sound. They love to help each other and find new websites to visit. This was an awesome way to get them involved and excited about presenting as well! Our second suggestion is a wonderful company called .studentreasures.com. They supply everything a student needs to make their own book! They can illustrate, write, make a poetry collection the choices are endless! When the book is complete just send it back and they will bind it. If you want to extra copies they do charge a nominal fee. This is a wonderful way to compile their writings and a fantastic keepsake!

6 years ago · Like · Comment
eeejunesgirl: Thank you for the studentreasures.com website! My oldest kids made books back when they went to public school & I have wanted to make books with them that contain more than construction paper & cardboard! Thank YOU very much!
5 years ago · Like

momof7c

My 6th grade son HATED to write - a 15 minute writing assignment used to take him 2+ hours to finish. But he has a great imagination and is a wonderful storyteller. Last fall, I signed him up for the Young Writers Program through NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writers Month). It is a month-long writing challenge where participants are encouraged to set a writing goal for the month (adults have to do 50,000 words - there are suggested word amounts for students of all ages) and then write, write, write. The program is FREE and if you actually reach your goal as a student you get a FREE printed version of your book. My son had a goal of 3,000 words. He surpassed that, with 3,032 words. After letting the book "rest" for a few months (and concentrating on other assignments), we are back to a major edit. He currently has over 9,600 words and will have a finished novel by the end of May. Do you know what he said to me last week? "Writing is now my 2nd favorite subject!" (Science is his first love.) He willingly wrote a website for his History Day project (at one point he had nearly 3,000 words and cried when he had to pare that down to 1,200) and no longer fights me when he has to write for other assignments.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

lsnyder

Our family has been most fortunate in that everyone loves to read. My children have not always been fond of writing. I have tried journaling, letters, story prompts, etc... and none of them sparked that interest in writing. Finally I turned to the examples of some of their favorite authors and had them "rewrite the stories" and put an alternate ending on others' stories. We might take an approach of it the main character had made this decision instead, how would the outcome have changed? Then we started pretending that we were a certain character in history and wrote the history lesson from that character's perspective. Our son this year has taken an imaginary immigrant family and traced their story through letters back home to their European relatives. Their story has spanned from the Pilgrims up to 1900 so far. This has followed right along with our American History class and he uses actual events from history from that character's perspective. It has been a great way to get into writing and to cement in events from history.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

KendraH

My daughter loves to read, so we encourage her to read to us as we do different activities around the house. She will follow us around the house reading. We also love the Magic Tree House series, so we often will have a day that we decorate a room, and eat something from that era or place and read the book as we eat and relax.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

birthjoy

I think that the "love of reading" is something that children have to fall into themselves. Just as education is "not the filling of a bucket but the lighting of a fire" so it is with reading. Our family's approach has been to simply show our children how much we enjoy reading AND how it is linked to absolutely everything that we want to do with our lives. Further, we have made reading a shared experience from which we can all draw what we want and need. Experiencing amazing novels together as a family has made reading something special and desired.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

prairiemom

The best way we have found to instill a love of reading in our children has been to read to them, read to them, read to them. We started reading to our children when they were big enough to sit on our laps. We have pictures of our middle son, sitting on the couch with his little book (he was about two) while Daddy sat on the couch with his magazine. I have 3 boys so the fact that all of our boys enjoy reading speaks well of our method! I still read to them, during meals. I also change my voice depending on the characters and ethnicity (like a British accent) so it brings books to life.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

lisa_c

We have a small literature group for high school students. We call it "Pleasure Reading is not an Oxymoron!" We choose our books from the AP or College Board recommended reading lists for college bound students. The students (and parents who wish to) read the book and then we meet for lunch at a local cafe. We discuss the book, including literary concepts and devices, author bio, etc. Sometimes we'll compare and contrast it with another book we've read or watch the movie on which the book was based so we can compare and contrast the two. One time, we read and listened to "The Gift of the Magi" and then did a literary analysis of the short story. We have a bit of pre-reading for the next book at the close of each session.We focus on cultural literacy and references as well as biblical allusions (most members of our group are not biblically literate but enjoy obtaining a more complete understanding of the book). In advance of our meetings, I usually send the students email, asking them to make note of certain literary elements or sending them study guides or bringing literary terms to their attention. Learning to share insights on a book and to enjoy books with friends is a wonderful experience for my teen and his friends (and our meetings are always enjoyable for me, too). We've read Twain, Steinbeck, and Fitzgerald, among others. Currently, we are reading "Brave New World." I try to make this group as stress-free and enjoyable as possible, while incorporating the concepts traditionally covered in a high school literature class.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

HayleyM

I'm certain that my children would hate reading if they had stayed in public school. My oldest (7th grade, 12 years old) is dysgraphic, and associated reading with writing (which he hated since it was so difficult for him) until we started homeschooling. Since he did not want to read at first, I allowed him to listen to books on cd. Then I started having him read along while listening. Finally we dropped the cd's completely. I generally let him read whatever strikes his fancy as long as I approve of it. This keeps the joy in it for him. (I have tried to assign things that I think are worthwhile, but this tends to backfire on me.)

A couple of years ago he read The Lightning Thief and loved it. He read the entire series that year and got really into Greek history and mythology which was fun. Reading really brought the ancients to life for him.

My daughter (middle child - 3rd grade, 8 years old) is profoundly dyslexic. We do weekly reading therapy with a reading therapist, as well as daily home therapy. Since she is not a strong reader yet, we bought Five in a Row from Rainbow Resources. She and my youngest absolutely LOVE this program. She would most certainly have hated reading if she were still in public school, but if you ask her if she likes to read she will tell you yes! Five in a Row is definitely a big part of that.

My little guy (Kindergarten, 6 years old) is definitely a more standard learner. Things come naturally to him, so I began teaching him to read at the beginning of this year with "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons". We are now around 65 lessons into the book, and he is doing great! The lessons are quick and simple and for a typical learner very effective!

Overall I try not to pile on too much. I try to keep it light and enjoyable. Reading is one of those things that kids can get easily turned off to if you force it.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

sclampy

My children have always loved books. This is probably because they have been surrounded by books since birth. As soon as they hit six months old, my husband and I would read bedtime stories to them every night. So it really is no surprise that they were anxious to read all those great adventures for themselves. To help them achieve this goal, I set up a chart with 100 spaces and gave them some beginner phonics readers. Together we would snuggle on the couch and sound out words one by one as the story unfolded. Each time we made it through a book, the child would add a sticker to the chart and I would write the title of the book.
By the time we made it to 50 my child was able to read these easy phonic books mostly alone. So we would move on to a little more challenging readers. But before we did there would be a small celebration. The child and I would look over the chart together and take notice of their progress. I would show them the first book they struggled with; which seemed easy to them now. And I would present them with a small wrapped gift. The pride on the face was evident.
The next challenge was to reach 100. With renewed interest and determination, my child would tackle each book, learning phonics, sight words, grammar and spelling as a bonus. Everyday we would snuggle on the couch celebrating each new victory. By the time my child approached the 80s they would be reading simple chapter books such as "Little Bear". I thought they would balk at the idea of reading such a long book in order to get credit for their chart, but I was wrong. Instead they took on the challenge head on. When my child finally reached 100 books he had become an independent reader! It was time for the ceremony. I had ordered a special medal from an online trophy company and had it engraved. It stated the child's name, year and "I read 100 books!" As a family we celebrated this child's accomplishment with a party, certificate and of course the presentation of the medal. I chose a medal instead of a trophy so that they could wear it proudly. And they did. Everywhere we went, someone would comment on the medal and reinforce the pride my child felt in his accomplishment.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

GoldenAcademy

My daughter's passion for reading that started around eighteen months old. My family and I would read stories to her daily even reading signs and labels to her, pointing out the letters and their sounds.
As a toddler she would often lay in her bed with a book reading to her stuffed animals, the words didn't matter just the act of reading help develop her love for books.
At age three her Grandmother began reading a book a day with her working their way up to whole book series. Now at age eight they have completed the Little House on the Prairie series in just a couple of months.

When she was twenty months old she picked up a crayon and held it just like a pencil and began trying to write so I would hold her hand and guide her as she wrote her name and drew shapes. At age six I began having her watch fun news pieces like the Presidential Turkey Pardon, she would draw a picture of what she saw and then write the story behind it. Having her write a story about things that she is interested in has allowed her literature skills to blossom.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Earthami

We are struggling with what looks like dyslexia in our 8 year old son and trying to find a way to make reading enjoyable. What I'm doing is reading books that he is interested in out loud to him. These are at a much high reading level than he is able to read to himself. We recent purchased the Reading Assistant program through the co-op and he is really enjoying reading to himself and hearing his voice played back on the computer.

6 years ago · Like · Comment
HayleyM: My 8 year old daughter is dyslexic. Look up a few posts to see my comments. We have enrolled her in a private therapy program which has helped tremendously (very expensive, but for her severity it was necessary). But she really enjoys Five in a Row which incorporates picture books into a unit study approach. The lessons are short and fun and very educational.

I highly recommend getting a private evaluation from a reading therapist to diagnose the type and severity of the dyslexia. Good luck!
6 years ago · Like

faithmyeyes

Grammar is simply learning how to use words to communicate, so we always end our grammar studies with real-life-everyday-we'll-actually-use-this-one-day-grammar. One of my all time favorite things to do is pull out an old book and read it aloud to my kids. We'll pick what we're listening for each time. Sometimes, we'll 'listen' for commas and each time we hear one, we'll outline that comma with a highlighter. Other times, we'll 'listen' for capital letters and highlight them. Sometimes, we 'listen' for direct objects or exclamation points or adjectives. It can be anything. The point is to take what they're learning and show them how it's used in everyday life. My kids absolutely LOVE this activity (9 y/o -15 y/o) and every time we do it, their writing (the true test of Grammar) improves!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

homeiscool

When my child was a baby and growing up, books were part of his toys. I have waterproof books for bathing and board books in my diaper bag to take along. He loved flipping the pages and enjoyed the pictures. Then when it was time for toilet training, books were his companion. Then I ordered from a Book Order Club a 100-piece for a $100 box of books from Scholastics. It was my ready stock of surprises to bring home whenever I went out. BUT one day I was surprised to see him devouring on the box of books I kept. He found them and was "reading" endlessly. He couldn't read yet, but he was so engaged with each of the books that it was his pacifier. Now, he just turned eight and he reads his brother's 11th grade books, one of which is History of the Catholic Church. I bring him to bookstores and he just loves every trip we make.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

homeiscool

When my child was a baby and growing up, books were part of his toys. I have waterproof books for bathing and board books in my diaper bag to take along. He loved flipping the pages and enjoyed the pictures. Then when it was time for toilet training, books were his companion. Then I ordered from a Book Order Club a 100-piece for a $100 box of books from Scholastics. It was my ready stock of surprises to bring home whenever I went out. BUT one day I was surprised to see him devouring on the box of books I kept. He found them and was "reading" endlessly. He couldn't read yet, but he was so engaged with each of the books that it was his pacifier. Now, he just turned eight and he reads his brother's 11th grade books, one of which is History of the Catholic Church. I bring him to bookstores and he just loves every trip we make.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

homeiscool

When my child was a baby and growing up, books were part of his toys. I have waterproof books for bathing and board books in my diaper bag to take along. He loved flipping the pages and enjoyed the pictures. Then when it was time for toilet training, books were his companion. Then I ordered from a Book Order Club a 100-piece for a $100 box of books from Scholastics. It was my ready stock of surprises to bring home whenever I went out. BUT one day I was surprised to see him devouring on the box of books I kept. He found them and was "reading" endlessly. He couldn't read yet, but he was so engaged with each of the books that it was his pacifier. Now, he just turned eight and he reads his brother's 11th grade books, one of which is History of the Catholic Church. I bring him to bookstores and he just loves every trip we make.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

homeiscool

When my child was a baby and growing up, books were part of his toys. I have waterproof books for bathing and board books in my diaper bag to take along. He loved flipping the pages and enjoyed the pictures. Then when it was time for toilet training, books were his companion. Then I ordered from a Book Order Club a 100-piece for a $100 box of books from Scholastics. It was my ready stock of surprises to bring home whenever I went out. BUT one day I was surprised to see him devouring on the box of books I kept. He found them and was "reading" endlessly. He couldn't read yet, but he was so engaged with each of the books that it was his pacifier. Now, he just turned eight and he reads his brother's 11th grade books, one of which is History of the Catholic Church. I bring him to bookstores and he just loves every trip we make.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

pawood17

Read to them, be patient and let them read when they are ready, then get out of their way.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

lildread

I have a 10,3,1 year old and my 10year old already reads at a 11th &12th grade level. what i do is let her read books that we get from the public library or she would read anything she gets her hands on. She have already wrote 13books, and about 3 recipe books i let her do lots of quizzes online as -well challenge her in some advanced reading and language arts materials @ this site http://www.englishforeveryone.org/Topics/Reading%20Comprehension.htm and my 3 yr old already knows how to read certain thing as well as write her abc and her name all i did was make her some flash cards and maybe pick up some from the dollar store which is only a dollar and i will make videos of different things as far as animal, places, etc.... and they love it my 10 yr old also play school with them. She would like to put 1 of her books up for download so your kids can enjoy it as well if so post it and let me know if thats a good idea. I would be surely they would enjoy it.......

6 years ago · Like · Comment

junebug

I have enjoyed reading all the new ideas. I can only say after home schooling over ten years now and one finally in college. Please do not give up. They will get it!! Yes, it is true they can actually read, write their name and spell upon graduation. lol Seriously though some of the most precious memories of my kids are the reading times we spent together, my main tip in the early years, they would read a page then I would read a page and I always read the book back to them once we get through it.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

kelleydq

Tips for helping children love reading and writing:
-Read to them a lot of fun books when they are young.
-Make reading a part of your day - let them see you reading for pleasure - show them that you are excited about reading.
-Read aloud to them - even the older children. It is a fun family activity and that way you all can discuss and laugh together. It also helps the younger child who is just learning to read to enjoy books. Sometimes beginning readers get discouraged because it takes them so long to get through a book and they really can't enjoy while sounding words out constantly, so I think that reading aloud helps give them a break and just enjoy books.
-When you want to test reading comprehension, do it in a fun way to avoid having your children think it is just more work. Some things that we do are make book posters together while discussing the book casually, make newspapers about events that happened in the book, make a video news show where the children report on what happened in the book or a book review of a book they really enjoyed, do something that one of the characters in the book did (such as an activity like cooking or art or a walk, etc) - while you do it, discuss more about the book. The key to enjoyment is to do it in a fun, informal way.
-Helping children love writing is sometimes difficult because it is a lot of work for them. I like to focus on 1 area at a time. For example, if I want them to focus on perfect handwriting, we just do some copywork or a section in our Reason for Handwriting book. If I want them to have fun with creative writing, I will many times write for them and let them just be creative with the story. You can let them tell you about the story they want to write and then just write an outline or story web for them. An older child (maybe 3rd or 4th) can then take those points that they brainstormed and turn them into a short story. It also helps to make the writing assignments fun. Some examples are to make a newspaper about yourself or something you are studying, write reviews of a favorite book or toy or food, write a recipe book, etc. Kids love making magazines too - have your older child create a magazine article in Microsoft OneNote for each book they read during the year, then, at the end of the year, you can put them all together into a magazine, and they can design a cool cover.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

I got my 2 sons interested in reading when they were young. When my husband worked 2 full time jobs, by mid evening, I was ready for a break. Of course I felt like the most awful mom for wanting a break and of course putting the kids to bed so early was not an option. Instead, we all took a break in our bed's to read on our own. It gradually grew into something that all of us enjoyed and looked forward to every day. We stay up later together these days but we always end the day with quiet reading before going to sleep for the night.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

growingingrace

We give our children a small notebook (spiral bound, hardcover, approx 6" x 7") and tell them they can write stories about ANYTHING. They write a title on the first page. The next page lists each of the chapter numbers. As the story unfolds they add titles to each chapter. Then they add illustrations as they would like throughout the story. We do not concentrate on correct spelling or grammar at this time. We just let them enjoy writing. It is amazing to hear the wonderful stories they come up with. They come and say, "Mom, want to hear my story."

This is an on-going project that they add to throughout the school year. Each age ends up with a different level of writing but it is fun for all!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Mommieakin

My daughter, 6, was a very reluctant reader. She didn't even want to try. So I purchased a pair of reading glasses that have rhinestones all the way around the frames, and I punched out the lenses. They are very fancy! I made these her "reading glasses". She could only wear them when she was reading. Needless to say, she is now a happy reader.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Jul

My son learned to read the readers of a popular curricula and continued to read whatever was put in front of him. Naturally, that's what I tried with my daughter. She HATED to read, though she was a good reader. I finally asked her what would make her enjoy reading, and her reply was, "real books". So... off to the library we went for her to pick out some real books. We came home with many Dr. Seuss books, which she VERY HAPPILY read. She then moved onto the Magic Treehouse series and had read every one in no time. Both my kids are now voracious readers, and I'm glad I listened to my daughter rather than forcing what worked for my son.

6 years ago · Like · Comment
kelleydq: I agree with you - when my oldest boy didn't want to read, I did the same thing. We went to the library and I let him choose whatever books he wanted to do for reading. All of a sudden, it was super fun for him. :)
Lady Rocketeer likes this. · 6 years ago · Like

My kids enjoy the "Now I'm Reading!" sets of books by Nora Gaydos. We have a lot of their sets at different levels. My older son also seemed to ramp up on learning to read by figuring out road signs or asking us what every single sign said.

We go to the library on a weekly basis and pick out giant piles of books. Both kids will sit on the sofa and "read" or my older one will actually read their way through them, sitting there for at least an hour enjoying them.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

juditupp

The most important thing we've done to help our kids love reading is to keep out video games and severely limit TV. The love of writing is tougher but allowing them to have lots of paper and praising them when they make attempts.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

kyboersarah

We had a really hard time getting started on learning how to read..Only because he fought me for a while..He has a love of nature and animals so I started buying books with a lot of pictures of only things he really loved. Then after a while he wanted to know more about the animals our outdoors...I told him all the information was right there in the book...He finally started to really try to read the information and it has just taken off from there...

No matter how many times I read to him or sat with him he just refused to really listen or want to hear it..but after this he has slowly started to continue to venture on out to learn more about what he is reading.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Cheri

To unleash my kids' love of reading and writing, we go to the zoo! We have a special table in the "forest" zone by the Lions where we sit. The sounds of the animals opens our imaginations. We read together, in turn. Then we outline an essay, and WRITE, WRITE, WRITE!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Livrae

Yet one more thing to add. When my daughter was younger I wrote out a bunch of words for her to cut out. Then we cut up a sheet of magnet into little piece and glued the words on to them. This projects took us half the day , but was well worth it. We put them on the side of the fridge and we would make up silly sentences for one another through out the day. She REALLY loved this game.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Livrae

I read to my daughter several hours a day from the start. When she was 4 she started reading on her own, so to go along with her new found love I decided to teach parts of speech. I wrote down a bunch of nouns, verbs and adjectives. She cut them out into rectangles w/ safety scissors, an activity she loved, and then on another piece of paper, divided into the 3 sections, she would tape them in the right category. Tape another favorite! She is 8 now but I still read out loud to her at least once a day. She also enjoys recommending books to her father and myself for us to read and talk about with her.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Livrae

My 8 yr old daughter loves the Ellie Mcdoodle series of books. It inspired her to make us hand made journals to write and doodle in through out the wk and then we exchange them at the end of the wk to see what the other one was up to . This is not only great for learning and creativity ,but for bonding as well.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Livrae

My husband and I are both big readers ,so it is no surprise that our daughter is as well. She is now 8 and just wrote a collections of poems which she is drawing the pictures for with a computer program. We are entering her poems into word doc to make this collection into a hard back book via Tikatok.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

TXGator

At night, my daughter (4 1/2) reads to us before bed. If she reads 1 story, we read 1 short story to her. If she reads us 2 stories, we read a long story to her. This is in addition to whatever we read that day during school. For writing, my daughter LOVES making up stories. She'll tell me a story and I'll type it up for her. Then she'll write the story out herself, using what I typed as a reference. She'll write on one page and then illustrate the story on the facing page. After we're done, we'll paste the pages onto construction paper and then bind it together so she has a book that she wrote all by herself! She'll take that book everywhere - reading her story to anyone who is willing to sit down and listen! ;-)

6 years ago · Like · Comment

TXGator

At night, my daughter (4 1/2) reads to us before bed. If she reads 1 story, we read 1 short story to her. If she reads us 2 stories, we read a long story to her. This is in addition to whatever we read that day during school. For writing, my daughter LOVES making up stories. She'll tell me a story and I'll type it up for her. Then she'll write the story out herself, using what I typed as a reference. She'll write on one page and then illustrate the story on the facing page. After we're done, we'll paste the pages onto construction paper and then bind it together so she has a book that she wrote all by herself! She'll take that book everywhere - reading her story to anyone who is willing to sit down and listen! ;-)

6 years ago · Like · Comment

GloryB2God

I start early. I have read to my girls when they were very young and now they love to read. I am thinking this is why I have early readers. But even more so, now that my oldest (6yrs) has been reading independantly for a year or so now, I still read to her and the rest of my girls together as a family. I heard that is a big mistake to make... that once our children start to read on their own, that we stop reading to them as a family. I will continue to read to them for a very long time. I love the closeness this gives our family.
The love of writting has not come yet as they are still very young, but I encourage art and expression through art and some writting and hopefully this will carry over into the love of writting.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Momof3

We make reading a family time! We cuddle up on the couch and choose a good read aloud. Then I allow each child to pick his/her favorite book to read. Reading is a bonding time for us!! When working on writing, I like to buy those blank hardback books. I let my children write and illustrate their own stories! They really enjoy this!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

MonaAnn

Being a grandma who is raising 2 of her grandsons, I have also been reading to them since they were babies. We have taken trips all over the country and get brochures and travel information about the places we have visited. These souvenirs are a big part of saved things and when the boys re-read them, they visit those places all over again. We also have family living in Oklahoma, North Dakota and Nevada so sending cards and letters to great-grandmas and cousins has been a learning experience for both Brandon and Tommy. When mail comes addressed to them, they are so excited to read what is going on in the lives of their relatives. It has been a very good way for them to learn the basics of letter writing and to sound out words. I find it has been a very positive experience for them to learn and they have also got friends to start writing letters.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Echo

I like most people have been reading to my kids since they were babies. I also taught them to rhyme at about age 2 or 3. Then I taught them that each letter makes a sound just like animals, & we pretend to be that letter & make the sound. Once they know how to read I buy them a set of "special" books that I will not read to them. For my first daughter it was the little chapter books for beginner readers. She soon out grew those & had read the entire Little House on the Praire series by age 6. She LOVES to read! I think having special books that they don't know what is going to happen & feel "big" to them helps encourage them to do it themselves. As for writing, one of my girls loves to sing, so I encourage her to write her songs down & her dads special time with her is teaching her to write poetry. He has also started with the 4 year old on poetry. I think a key thing is not to think they are too young for something, just let them try it & give them bigger expectations & they might just suprise you!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Gayle

I have a son who is 14 and a daugher who is 12. We had a 4 year period of time (2nd to 6rh grade for my son) and (K to 4th grade) for my daughter, when they had to be in public school. Dad got laid off and I had to go back to work.

We struggled to get back to the homeschool routine afterwards and one thing that I think really helped, was, although they could read (they both learned at by age 4 with just 20 minutes a day with a phonics program), I still read to them out loud.

I always read something that is above their reading level and often books that are from an earlier century. In addition to literature, they are living books that deal with history and sometimes economics and science. Their favorites have been "Swiss Family Robinson" which has a lot about science and technology and Jack Londdon's "Call of the Wild" which deals with science, history and economics. (Be aware that Jack London's books are a little bit gorry and may upset younger children).

I also read recent books on politics and economics and then we study these also in light of history.

Both my son and daughter are asigned to read a chapter from a non-fiction book every schoolday and a chapter from a fiction book every schoolday. (This is in addition of whatever else we are studying). They get to choose their non-fiction and fiction books with some guidance.

There is lively discussion that occurs during our reading and all of our homeschool work. I think that this emersion in books will help them to become lifelong readers.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

indiamom

My 8 year old daughter Meredith has always loved to read. She started reading at the very young age of three. She loves it when we cuddle up on the couch or lay outside under a tree and read together. We take turns reading her favorite books. This allows her to hear my articulation and pronunciation of words. We love to read like we are the characters in the book giving them a voice. She loves it so much, she's always begging me for just one more chapter. She has become a very good reader and we enjoy reading larger chapter books together that are appropriate of course for her.

We also write together. We like to write a lot from pictures I find in the magazines. I try to find interesting pictures that have a lot going on.We both will write at the same time. She loves to surprise me with her stories and won't let me look until she's all finished. "Don't look until I'm all done," she'll say. Then, we read each others and see what each other has come up with for the same picture. I think this is good modeling for her and it's a lot of fun to see what she writes. Often she put in things that have happened in our everyday life that make me laugh.

I think doing things together has made fun for her and also has given her a little competition...lol

6 years ago · Like · Comment

imamomof4

I chuckled when I read the term "unleashed" in this challenge because it's so appropriate for this little trick I'm going to share. Lots of families have pets and one of the joys of homeschooling is the bond our kids form with their furry friends while spending so much time with them each day. But these sweet creatures can also be a source of inspiration and motivation for writing! Here's what you can try: Ask your child to write from their pet's perspective. Curriculum call for a descriptive paragraph? Have your child describe a room in your house from the cat's point of view. Let him grab his writing notebook and lie down on his belly and look at the room. He must keep in mind he's no longer a boy, but a small animal that doesn't know the names of items such as " table" or "lamp" or what a TV is for. So, he must use adjectives to describe these items in creative cat-like ways! This is especially good for fidgety kids who hate sitting at a desk to write. It's also fun when teaching the mechanics of dialogue writing. Ask your child to observe your pet or pets throughout the day and then write out the animal's thought's in dialogue using correct punctuation and indentation. If you have both cats and dogs, as we do, this may evolve into an entire story wherein the secret thoughts of both pets towards each other (and you!) are revealed through the imagination of your child. No leash required!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Tami6410

We have read to our son since before he was born! His first bay toy was a soft covered book with taggies on it as well. I grew up being termed as a dumb kid, I did graduate from HS, not sure how I did it, I never read a book during HS. I found out when I was watching Oprah when I was in my early 30's that I was dyslexic. When I saw that show and realized that I had a learning disability, I bawled.

Because of this, I am determined that my son will not fall behind like I did. I watch for any dyslexia traits, and so far he has none, yayyy. He has surpassed my expectations and reads all the time. It warms my heart to see my 6 yr old reading and giggling at the stories.

He currently has a passion to write a book, so he and I are writing a children's book together. Our plan is to have it bound and ready for Christmas presents next year. He has decided to have 17 chapters in a book about team work that children from 3 yrs up can read. We worked together on the outline and have done a rough draft of 4 chapters so far. It is amazing to see his passion for writing this book. He wakes up some mornings with new thoughts to put into the outline for up coming chapters.

I love love love that my husband and I have been able to foster a love of learning in our boy! I encourage young mothers as much as I can to read to their baby's. It amazes me the looks I get from them, and their comments about the baby not understanding, and they think it is a waist of time. Then I tell them of my son starting to read at 3 yrs and about other mothers I have talked to who have read to their baby's and their baby's reading at young ages as well. I just hope and pray that those young mothers did as I suggested and started reading to their baby's like I did.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

mommasita

I started reading to my (2) boys since they were born, more importantly I gave them books as soon as they were grasping for things; soft fabric books at first, and plastic books in the bath tub. We keep books in every room; this was great when potty training; I'd keep two or three plastic Peter Rabbit or Winnie the Pooh books in a drawer in the bathroom; the training was quick and accident free.
They were both reading independently at age 5 (now 8 and 6).
We used the McGuffey's Eclectic Readers and continue to do so; this progressive set also develops their writing skills. My 6 year old just wrote his first paragraph independently yesterday.
When the boys were little we would play a game I called "And Then"; one of us would start a story with one sentence, say "and then..." and the next person would continue the story, then the next. We kept going trying to see how long or interesting we could make the story. We sat in a "camp fire" circle at home or also did this in the car. My older son can now well distinguish a run on sentence from one that is more concise.
Now that they have outgrown nap time, we've established quiet reading time which is about one hour daily; everyone grabs their favourite blanket and we all cuddle and read.
After dinner the whole family will have family reading time where my husband or I will read aloud.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

mommasita

I started reading to my (2) boys since they were born, more importantly I gave them books as soon as they were grasping for things; soft fabric books at first, and plastic books in the bath tub. We keep books in every room; this was great when potty training; I'd keep two or three plastic Peter Rabbit or Winnie the Pooh books in a drawer in the bathroom; the training was quick and accident free.
They were both reading independently at age 5 (now 8 and 6).
We used the McGuffey's Eclectic Readers and continue to do so; this progressive set also develops their writing skills. My 6 year old just wrote his first paragraph independently yesterday.
When the boys were little we would play a game I called "And Then"; one of us would start a story with one sentence, say "and then..." and the next person would continue the story, then the next. We kept going trying to see how long or interesting we could make the story. We sat in a "camp fire" circle at home or also did this in the car. My older son can now well distinguish a run on sentence from one that is more concise.
Now that they have outgrown nap time, we've established quiet reading time which is about one hour daily; everyone grabs their favourite blanket and we all cuddle and read.
After dinner the whole family will have family reading time where my husband or I will read aloud.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

3swimboysmom

As far as writing is concerned, every Friday my boys have "Story Starters". All 3 of my boys receive the same sentence or two to start a story and then they have to go to separate area to continue the story. We've had some starters that end up being 5 page stories, complete with illustrations! Once everyone is finished we all head to the living room where they read their stories out loud to the whole family. We have had some really good laughs this way, and it is amazing to notice the similariteis and differences in the stories!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

Melaniemomof2

Read, read, and then read some more! I am a firm believer in reading out loud to your children! I read out loud a lot to my kids when they are younger and as much as I can no matter how old they are. We also use mostly "living books" in our homeschool as recommended by Charlotte Mason. My daughter's favorite way to spend time with me is to read together-she's 9 years. old. We also have lots of books readily available so that there is always another book to read. We make weekly trips to the library. I think the best way to encourage kids to read is to have a literature-rich environment. :-)

6 years ago · Like · Comment

salli007

I read to my children (3 boys) even before they were born and continue to do so. The 2 oldest (9 & 7) love to read now. This is in part because we make it fun in many different ways. We have a collection of over 600 children's books, resource books, and magazines, so their is a variety of subjects they can choose from. Here are some of the activities we have done. They read a story in their comfy spot , sometimes I read it, we act out the story, we create art pieces about the story, we may even tell the story in a different way (alternate endings), we read outside, and so on. Creativity is the key for us. We like to make the stories come alive.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

dmrhubarb

I started reading to my children when they were babies. Each night we would sit and read books together. I still read at bedtime and my oldest is now 12. One of our favorite activities is to go to the library. They could check out as many books as they wished so we would end up with stacks and stacks of books. We also like to listen to audiobooks while driving. I would pick age appropriate series books like Magic Tree House, Magic School Bus, Boxcar Children, A to Z Mysteries, etc and once the kids identified with the characters, they had to hear or read every book in the series. I have also created a home library from second hand books where the kids can select any book they are interested in. Get them to bring books to the doctor or dentist. Reading a good story is much more fun than being bored waiting. My kids love to read and my youngest at 7 years old has virtually taught himself by following along with me.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

LaCourre

Before my son could even write, I would encourage him to make up his own stories. As he would come up with the words, I would act as secretary/typist and type as he spoke. I would read it back to him, we would print it out, and he would illustrate! We would simply staple it together in little books. I started this at age 3. It really helped it build reading skills quickly, as he would want to read his books. At age 8, he is not fast at writing, so I still let him dictate his stories... then he can optionally rewrite them as copywork.

6 years ago · Like · Comment

3000melanies

My daughter used to hate reading. Even though she had a good vocabulary and could "read the words" it just wasn't enjoyable. I quit trying to assign books that were in our curriculum because I felt a love of reading was more important than a particular topic. I went to the library and picked out a selection of books that were the first in a series. (At that time, I couldn't even get her to pick out a book at the library.) She found one she loved and she hasn't stopped looking forward to reading since!

6 years ago · Like · Comment

"Grammar Active has been a great addition to our home schooling bundles. With 6 children all in different grades (1st through 9th) keeping up with each of them and their different learning styles is sometimes a challenge. With the CD's I can let them each pick out what they want to focus on that week and then allow them free time with the game CD. Thank-you for another great product! I am positive we will be using this product for many years to come. We are now on the mission to let as many people know about this product and the co-op."
Michelle A., Co-op Member

"These study guides are fabulous. My daughter was deeply engaged in each book she read. Each guide helped her make connections with the text and caused her to strengthen her relationship with the Lord.



I couldn't be happier with Progeny-Press. They are an excellent resource for our Language Arts program!"
Alicia Rivet, Co-op Member

"Recently I purchased a bundle of study guides through Homeschool Buyers Co-op at a very substantial discount. They were downloadable files which made the purchase very attractive, and the service in the whole transaction was exceptional.



We are a long term homeschool family having done this for near 18 years now. We have graduated two children and are in our second year of schooling our four youngest. Years ago we stumbled upon the "gem" of Progeny-Press and our older children benefited immensely from the content and challenge these literature study guides included. When I saw them on HSBC-op I was delighted.



I have not used any of the guides yet, but I have downloaded all five, printed several, and remain thrilled about them for the same reasons mentioned previously. My younger children will be delighted as best they can at their ages, me more so, because these guides offer me all that I need to engage them in each story and bring them to the truths being presented.



This purchase was by far one of my best for this school year. I am delighted to have as much in e-format that I can. I can be in control of the amount of items on my shelves then, as well as the cost is much less than as if I had ordered hard copies to begin with.



Kudos for the offer of Progeny-Press Study Guides at a phenomenal rate. They have my vote."
Mrs. Loretta Smith, Co-op Member

"PLATO Learning is a great resource for homeschoolers! The quality of instruction is high. We will continue to use it for high school science, literature and math courses."
ND, Co-op Member

"Challenging, direct science provided from a standards based educational platform. Plato science provides evolutionary based science, in an easy to digest multi-media self-directed platform.



Lessons typically consist of a reading or video.



An offline worksheet, which often consists of a theoretical lab the student responds to, and a short quiz.



Grading by HBC, is done in part by Plato, and in part by the parent/learning coach.



My daughter is 11 and taking Life Science A, the course is rigourus enough that at times we need to work together and while I have found a few errors in the answer keys (provide through your educator link) over all I am satisfied with the product.



While there are videos embedded in the course itself, there are times, as was the case with mendelian genetics, where I knew my daughter would need some extra support, so I simply email a link to a youtube, natgeo, or other similar platform. It absolutely could be a "plug and play" course option for a slightly older teen. I think it depends on how much reading your child is used to doing.



Overall I like the product, I have a great affinity for Intellego Unit studies (also available here), so I am on the fence about next January semester. We will likely do about half and half , completing a good portion of Life Science this semester and adding Human Body & Disease (6-8), or perhaps Cells & Genetics (6-8). To round out and finish off the year.



I would personally rate the following for the course for self-pacing:



Reading - Moderate to Rigorous

Vocabulary - 8th or higher



Content - Good, Evolutionary, a reasonable amount of media (not as much as I expected), but overall I know my student is learning some important skills such as following directions, interpretation/comprehension, etc...



Math - Need experience graphing w/ solid interpretation prior to beginning. Pre-Algebra would most certainly be helpful.



Focus - Moderate to High attention span, I think students doing this program need to have the ability to self-direct.



At home needs:

Printer - unless doing off-line work orally, or a PDF conversion program.



Dictionary - for vocabulary words



Access to videos or expansion books for support on some subjects.



Access to parent or sibling to answer questions occasionally, or a notebook to write down questions for self-investigation, or end of school day round table where instructor can do some sleuth work and provide a couple of links the following day on more difficult topics...its science, no matter what program at our house, there will always be another question! :)



Everything else (so far) has been included in the course materials posted through instructor support (the link at the bottom of your subscription info)



Good Luck! :)"
Kerry Frank, Co-op Member

"Word Voyage has been a wonderful teaching tool. It has help my son develop better writing skills including grammar and punctuation. It has also helped with his spelling and vocabulary. The really great part is, he doesn't mind doing it!"
Emily S., Co-op Member

"As a teacher I truly enjoy using Word Voyage with my 9 year old daughter Sarah. The program is a rigorous and demands a good deal of attention to detail. She says "I like Word Voyage a lot; it helps me understand the meanings of the words by through better understanding the prefixes and suffixes.""It also helps with spelling."



Overall as a parent I would recommend this program to the serious student, it is not a game based interface and requires attention to detail. My daughter loves it, but she tends to be very cerebral, a quiet observe and can sit for long periods without issues. An average lesson 45 minutes to an hour for us.



User Interface Student (students view):

Well set-up, the creators were able to set it up in a way that introduces the words first without providing too much detail, until after the concepts are clear.



Parent Interface (parent view): A little bit of a learning curve on submitting assignments and grading, but once learned is fairly simple.



Things that could be improved(students view): If you get the answer wrong a number of times, then the program should take you through how to find the answer without providing the answer.



Things that could be improved (parent view): Automated sentences and grading; though there could be inherent problems with this automation ie; partial credit, etc..."
Kerry Frank, Co-op Member

"Thank you for offering this periodical at a discount. For my children, it is a wonderful source for learning about current events from a Christian world view. The articles are rather concise but are well written. A nice bonus is that Gods World News now offers free access to a web sites that corresponds to the magazine you subscribe to. The web site contains additional information and is full of fun and educational material. Buyers should be aware, though, that for each subscription you have, only one child/student is allowed to be signed up for access to the web site."
Carol R., Co-op Member

"We are so grateful for a current events source that is based on truth and in a format that our children (ages 3-15) LOVE and look forward to. The new online content is a fun addition. We plan to continue to use GWN for all of our children and are very grateful for the opportunity to purchase the subscriptions here at the Co-op for such an incredible price. A big THANK YOU to God's World News and the Homeschool Buyers Co-op!"
Janelle, Co-op Member

"This product is a great way to enhance speech therapy and promote confidence in learning phonics. We use it to supplement our speech and phonics curricula. Our kids like the autonomy and the fun characters which encourages them even more. We have told others about this product and how much our kids really enjoy it! Thanks for having ClickNKIDS!!"
Tess S., Co-op Member

"I am a new, just starting out HSer with a 5 yo and I wasn't sure how to proceed and he was resisting anything that felt like "school" and not making much progress with learning to read....then I bought Click-N-Read phonics through the Co-op, at a fabulous price, and he's doing fantastic with it ! He is way ahead of where I was in kindergarten and to him it's all fun ! The program gave us our start in making some progress with our home school and I couldn't be happier!"
Linda B., Co-op Member

"I purchased this program for my 12 year old son and 16 year old daughter. Some of the information my kids had never even learned before. Most of the lessons my kids had been taught at one time or another, but not to mastery. That's the thing that this program does best. You can't guess your way out of it. You must master the information to move on and it can be challenging, but so worth it. I think this is a very helpful program for anyone from middle through high school, even for those who are out of school for a good review."
Mary S., Co-op Member

"We love EGUMPP. Grammar is my son's and my least favorite subject and this program explains things so that they are clear and concise and you feel accomplished when completing a lesson. My son's comment is that he has learned more this year (10th grade) than all the other years combined using this program. I highly recommend it to anyone."
Regina Bishop, Co-op Member

"My granddaughter has a learning disability She was able to select from many different approaches Raz Kids had audio and with that the words were highlighted as she looked on She was able to choose the level of reading what she was comfortable with Raz Kids selection of stories kept her captivated Her reading level jumped by leaps and bounds and her self esteem increased Thanks Raz Kids We will be ordering A Z Science next"
Gail Norris Hayes, Co-op Member

"I wanted to buy this product from the company and they said that I couldn't. When I found out that you had it, I bought it on the spot. It is so helpful for both my students. My kids love it. I have been using the books for years, but this makes it so much better for my students. The now have the correct pronunciation on the spot and when they make a mistake they know right away. It's just an awesome program that I will purchase again and again."
V Phelps, Co-op Member

"I use this program for my second grader and he loves it. He likes doing lessons on the computer as it makes him feel like a bigger kid. I really like the functionality of the program especially the speaker function. If my son has problems with the passage or a question, the speaker button reads the section to him. This is a real plus for the lower grades. The voice they use is fabulous, not one of those computer drones. There are just enough vocabulary words for each lesson. My son is actually using some of the words in his everyday conversations so I know it is working. I will definitely continue to use this product."
Dena Angeles, Co-op Member

"We really like Fixit Grammar. It has been a great asset to our homeschool routine."
Amanda W., Co-op Member

"Fixit Grammar has been a huge help to our family. My daughter was getting bogged down with other grammar programs that were too long and didn't hold her interest. We gave Fixit Grammar a try for 5th grade and live it! She actually enjoys it and looks forward to the lessons. It's quick and interesting but doesn't skimp on content. She has already learned more in 10 weeks than I ever thought possible. Love this program and wouldn't think of using anything else!"
Traci C., Co-op Member

"My 5 and 6-year-old boys BEG to play the Looney Tunes Phonics program every day they love it so much. It is fun, entertaining, but best of all they are learning. Great product!"
Carmen D., Co-op Member

"Through Homeschool Buyers Co-op I purchased the Looney Tunes Phonics program for my 6 year old son. Watching the Looney Tunes cartoon characters in the short films makes his phonics learning super fun!!"
J. Christianson, Co-op Member

"I am using the online product from ETC this year with my twins. I paid $60.00 per student for a year's access. Anything less than $60/student would be great, but to be completely honest, it is worth more to me than what I paid. GREAT GREAT PRODUCT.



I do not usually critique products, but this one I really believe in. The features for educators/parents are great too. I am really excited that this product will be available for less, so maybe more people will have the opportunity to experience it."
Julieann B., Co-op Member

"Getting my boys to enjoy anything language related has been a struggle, so I was thrilled to see ETC Online. The program is exciting for them to use and THEY ask ME if they can work on language now! I especially like that you can set the "Fun Button" to appear only after certain criteria are met. It's a great addition to our curriculum and I'm so thankful to HBC for offering it!"
Brandi J., Co-op Member

"I have NOT received it yet?"
Barbara Procter, Co-op Member

"My son enjoys the activities and I am seeing an appreciable improvement in his writing skills. Money well spent."
Darlene Silver, Co-op Member

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