Jarrell Plantation Historic Site

The Visiting Info shown below, if any, is always subject to change. Please check the facility's website for the latest information before making a trip.

Write a review of this Field Trip destination
O V E R V I E W
Facility:Jarrell Plantation Historic Site
Description:This cotton plantation was owned by a single family for more than 140 years. It survived Gen. Sherman's "March to the Sea," typhoid fever, Emancipation, Reconstruction, the cotton boll weevil, the advent of steam power and a transition from farming to forestry.

In 1847, John Fitz Jarrell built a simple heart pine house typical of most plantations and made many of the furnishings visitors see today. In 1860, the 600-acre plantation was farmed by 39 slaves. After the Civil War, John increased his land to nearly 1,000 acres farmed by former slaves. As John aged, most workers left and the slave houses deteriorated and disappeared.

After John's death, his son, Dick Jarrell, gave up teaching to return to the farm, and in 1895, he built a small house for his family that grew to 12 children. Dick diversified the farm, adding a sawmill, cotton gin, gristmill, shingle mill, planer, sugar cane press, syrup evaporator, workshop, barn and outbuildings. In 1974, his descendants donated these buildings to establish Jarrell Plantation State Historic Site.
A D D R E S S
Address 1:711 Jarrell Plantation Rd.
Address 2:
City:Juliette
State/Province:GA
Zip Code:31046
V I S I T I N G   I N F O
Hours:Tuesday-Saturday 9AM-5PM; Sunday 2-5:30PM; Last tour begins at 4PM.

Closed Monday (except holidays), Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year's Day.

Closed Tuesday when open Monday.
Admission:$2.50-$4.00
Group rates available with advance notice.
Telephone:(478) 986-5172
Website:http://gastateparks.org/info/jarrell/
R E V I E W S
Jackie Penn, Co-op Member
What a great way to spend a spring afternoon or a sunshiny summer day! Jarrrell Plantation has much to offer for all ages. Plan on spending several hours at the site. It is a good idea to take a picnic lunch. There are places to sit and enjoy your food while taking in the beauty of the farm.

A camera and tennis shoes are a must. There are trails to hike up and down as you walk to and fro to the different buildings. A field guide for books, plants, and bugs might be lots of fun, too.

Each different building or exhibit has well documented signs explaining what you see. If you are lucky, you might attend on a day when they are having demonstrations. They offer sheep shearing, candle making, quilting... on demonstration days. There are many historic buildings on site including a sawmill, a cotton gin, a gristmill, a workshop, a barn, and numerous outbuildings.

The office has a map and trivia type quiz paper for the kids. Be sure to grab one.

They are open from : Mon - Fri 9am to 5pm; Sun 2pm to 5:30pm

There is a very small gift store inside the facility.
Write a review of this Field Trip destination