Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

The Visiting Info shown below, if any, is always subject to change. Please check the facility's website for the latest information before making a trip.

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O V E R V I E W
Facility:Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument
Description:The park offers a glimpses of the homes and lives of Indians who lived there from the late 1270s through the early 1300s. The surroundings probably look today very much like they did when the cliff dwellings were inhabited. Archelogists have identified 46 rooms at the Gila Cliff Dwellings.

Activities in the Monument include bird watching, fishing, hiking, interpretive programs, nature walks, stargazing, and wildlife viewing. The Junior Ranger Program is a good way for kids to get a basic understanding of the history of the area.
A D D R E S S
Address 1:HC 68 Box 100
Address 2:
City:Silver City
State/Province:NM
Zip Code:88061
V I S I T I N G   I N F O
Hours:The cliff dwellings and trailhead Contact Station are open every day of the year, including all holidays. The Gila Visitor Center is open every day except Christmas and New Year's days.

Extended Summer Hours
From Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, the trail to the cliff dwellings is open from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The last visitors for the day are allowed up the trail at 6:00 p.m. and everyone must be off the trail by 7:00 p.m. The visitor center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Regular Hours
The rest of the year (Tuesday after Labor Day through Thursday before Memorial Day Weekend), the trail to the cliff dwellings is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The last visitors for the day are allowed up the trail at 4:00 p.m. and everyone must be off the trail by 5:00 p.m. The visitor center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Admission:$10 per family or $3.00 per adult (16 years and older) - per day. Free entrance for children 15 years and younger.
Telephone:(575) 536-9461
Website:http://www.nps.gov/gicl/
R E V I E W S
Laura Dawson, Co-op Member
What a great place to visit! If you like hiking and visiting dwellings hundreds of years old, this is the place for you. The drive just to get to the dwellings is an adventure in itself. We went March 2010 and drove up the winding roads through snow-covered mountains. It is a beautiful drive!

Once you get there, be sure to stop by the visitor's center first and ask the location of the pictographs along your first mile walk. You walk a mile to the starting point. You used to be able to park closer, but a portion of a bridge has collapsed and isn't accessible to vehicles any longer. Along the way, you will see campgrounds where you can camp out.

You then begin the one-mile loop to explore the cave dwellings. It is a slow, steady climb to the top, but it is filled with beauty and the anticipation that builds as you get closer to the dwellings. For those who may not be as fit, not to worry. There are plenty of benches along the way to rest and catch your breath. Even those who looked fit had to stop and rest a minute, but don't let the climb scare you. It is well worth it when you reach the top.

You get to walk in the caves and look around. It is an amazing experience. In one of the last caves, there is 700-year-old corn still in a basket. Also be on the lookout for two pictographs in that same room with the corn.

The scariest part for me was when we had to leave the caves. You climb down a ladder. I don't like ladders, and the sides were very hot from the sun. But, I made it, and you can, too!

You decline much faster than you went up, and then you have your one mile walk back to your car.

TIPS: Go to the restroom before you begin the one-mile loop to the dwellings. There are rustic restrooms available before you start the climb up. Bring water. Bring your camera. I wore a backpack and had a few bottles of water for my family.
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